What to feed babies with food allergies

It’s recommended that when your baby is ready, at around 6 months (but not before 4 months), introduce a variety of solid foods, starting with iron-rich foods, while continuing breastfeeding. Hydrolysed (partially and extensively) baby formula is not recommended for the prevention of allergies.

When you start introducing solids (weaning), introduce the foods that commonly cause allergies one at a time so that you can spot any reactions. Don’t delay introducing a food just because it’s considered a common allergen.

These foods include: milk, eggs, wheat, nuts, seeds, fish and shellfish. However, don’t introduce any of these foods before 6 months.

There is evidence that infants should be given allergenic solid foods including peanut butter, cooked egg and dairy and wheat products in the first year of life. This includes infants at high risk of allergy.

Don’t be tempted to experiment by cutting out a major food, such as milk, as this could lead to your kid not getting the nutrients they need. Talk to your doctor, who may refer you to a registered dietitian.


How will I know if my kid has a food allergy?

An allergic reaction can consist of 1 or more of the following:

  1. itchy skin or rash
  2. swollen lips and throat
  3. a cough
  4. runny or blocked nose
  5. diarrhoea or vomiting
  6. wheezing and shortness of breath
  7. itchy throat and tongue
  8. sore, red and itchy eyes

In a few cases, foods can cause a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) that can be life-threatening.

Get medical advice if you ponder your kid is having an allergic reaction to a specific food.

Don’t be tempted to experiment by cutting out a major food, such as milk, because this could lead to your kid not getting the nutrients they need. Talk to your health visitor or GP, who may refer you to a registered dietitian.


Peanut allergy

Your kid has a higher risk of developing a peanut allergy if they already own a known allergy (such as eczema or a diagnosed food allergy), or there’s a history of allergy in their immediate family (such as asthma, eczema or hay fever).

There is evidence that having peanuts regularly before 12 months can reduce the risk of developing peanut allergy.

If your kid already has an egg allergy, another food allergy or severe eczema, talk to your doctor before you give peanuts or food containing peanuts to your kid for the first time.

If you would love to eat peanuts or foods containing peanuts (such as peanut butter) while breastfeeding, you can do so unless you’re allergic to them or your health professional advises you not to.

Avoid giving your kid peanuts and foods containing peanuts before the age of 6 months.

Foods containing peanuts include peanut butter, peanut (groundnut) oil and some snacks. Little children are at a higher risk of choking on little objects, so avoid giving whole peanuts or nuts to children under age 5-years-old.

Read food labels carefully and avoid foods if you’re not certain whether they contain peanuts.


Food additives

Food contains additives for a variety of reasons, such as to preserve it, to assist make it safe to eat for longer and to give colour or texture.

All food additives go through rigorous assessments for safety before they can be used.

Food labelling must clearly show additives in the list of ingredients, including their name or number and their function, such as ‘colouring’ or ‘preservative’.

A few people own adverse reactions to some food additives, but reactions to ordinary foods, such as milk or soy, are much more common.



Is Your Food-Allergic Child’s Diet Nutritionally Balanced?

Removing foods from your kid can lead to the loss of significant nutrients. A balanced, nutrient-rich diet is vital for a child’s growth a development.

A child’s body stores nutrients. A short-term (2-week) elimination diet is likely not a concern regarding nutrition.

Beyond two weeks, you must discover safe sources of nutrients to replace the nutrients lost from foods your kid can no longer eat.

Restricted diets must own safe sources of nutrients.

Peanut and Tree Nut Allergy

Peanuts and tree nuts are a excellent source of protein in a child’s diet. Yet, if your kid needs to avoid nuts of any type, he should not be at nutritional risk. There are numerous other sources of protein as previously mentioned. Peanuts also provide a source of niacin, magnesium, vitamins E and B6, manganese, pantothenic acid, chromium, folacin, copper and biotin.

Your kid can get these vitamins and nutrients by consuming a variety of foods from other food groups.

Soy Allergy

Soybeans provide one of the highest quality proteins in a child’s diet. They also contain thiamin, riboflavin, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, zinc and vitamin B6. These are present in specific soy foods. The little amounts of soy in processed foods do not supply a significant quantity of these nutrients.

A soy-restricted diet should not pose a nutritional problem if your kid eats a variety of fruits, vegetables, enriched and fortified grains, and tolerated sources of protein.

Milk Allergy

Milk is one of the most common food allergies in young children.1 Milk provides a excellent source of numerous nutrients essential for bone mineralization and growth. These nutrients are especially significant during peak growth periods.

These nutrients include: protein, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin A, vitamin B12, riboflavin and phosphorus.

In order for your kid to replace these nutrients, you must carefully select food substitutes. Meats, poultry, eggs, fish, nuts and legumes can easily provide needed protein.

But, to get enough calcium, your kid may need to eat lots of non-dairy food sources containing calcium. This may be more than a young kid is capable of eating. Numerous of these non-dairy sources are not foods that are favorites of most children.

For example, one cup of leafy greens contains as much calcium as 4 ounces of milk.

A kid who needs milligrams of calcium daily would need to eat as much as 4 cups of leafy greens to meet the requirement. Would your kid eat every these leafy greens? Probably not. So, you will need to read labels to carefully seek out a variety of calcium-fortified foods.

In some cases, you may need to give your kid supplements. If he is at an age when a specialized milk-free formula is a large part of his daily diet, a supplement may not be necessary.

You may be capable to use milk alternatives as an acceptable substitute if your kid is over one year ancient.

You can substitute soy milk, fortified rice milk, grain and nut milks (such as oat milk and almond milk) if tolerated. Be certain to read labels to make certain these milk substitutes are fortified with additional nutrients.

For example, glance for the nutrition information on the package to check the quantity of protein. There should be 8 grams per 8 ounce serving. Calcium fortified juices will provide additional calcium, but are not a excellent source of other nutrients.

Wheat Allergy

Wheat is a grain you can replace with other grains. Allergies to other grains love corn, rice, barley, buckwheat and oats are not common. But, you will need to select other grains with care due to the possibility of cross contact.

Be certain to select alternate grains from a reputable source.

Wheat is often fortified with additional nutrients. The milling process for grains can also remove significant nutrients, so make certain you select fortified and enriched grains. A serving or two of an enriched and fortified grain at each meal will contribute to meeting significant nutritional needs for B vitamins, folacin and iron.

You can substitute wheat flour with other fortified grain flours in recipes to provide the same nutrients as wheat. But, replacing wheat flour with other grain flours can affect how the recipe turns out.

What to feed babies with food allergies

Follow your recipe carefully to get the best result.

Egg Allergy

Children with egg allergy must avoid egg in every forms, unless their allergy specialist tells you otherwise. Egg white is the part of the egg responsible for the allergic reactions. But, it’s impossible to separate the white from the yolk without the yolk containing traces of egg white protein.

Eggs provide a source of quality protein as well as iron, biotin, folacin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, selenium, and vitamins A, D, E and B Your kid can get an adequate quantity of protein from other protein sources, such as: milk, meat, poultry, fish, nuts and legumes.

Be certain your kid is not allergic to these substitutions.

What to feed babies with food allergies

Meat can also supply selenium and vitamin B Folacin is in legumes, fruits and leafy greens. If your kid consumes a variety of other foods, an egg-free diet should not put your kid at nutritional risk.

A kid avoiding foods containing egg may lose essential nutrients from the diet. For example, most baked goods use enriched and fortified flour, which contains B vitamins and iron. A kid avoiding baked goods will need to get additional calories, B vitamins, iron and additional nutrients from other egg-free sources.

Fish Allergy

Fish is a excellent source of protein. Fish contains the nutrients niacin, vitamins B6, B12, A and E. Fish also contains phosphorus, selenium, magnesium, iron and zinc.

If your kid must avoid fish, you can discover the same nutrients in other protein sources such as meats, grains and legumes.

References


1. Boyano-Martinez, et al. (). Accidental allergic reactions in children allergic to cow’s milk proteins. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology,

Exclusive breastfeeding or first baby formula is recommended for around the first 6 months of life.

If your baby has a cow’s milk allergy and is not being breastfed, talk to your GP about what helpful of formula to give your baby.

What to feed babies with food allergies

Pregnant or breastfeeding women don’t need to avoid foods that can trigger allergic reactions (including peanuts), unless you’re allergic to them.

If your baby already has an allergy such as a diagnosed food allergy or eczema, or if you own a family history of food allergies, eczema, asthma or hay-fever, you may need to be particularly careful when introducing foods, so talk to your GP or health visitor first.


Introducing foods that could trigger allergy

When you start introducing solid foods to your baby from around 6 months ancient, introduce the foods that can trigger allergic reactions one at a time and in extremely little amounts so that you can spot any reaction.

These foods are:

  1. seeds (serve them crushed or ground)
  2. soya
  3. eggs (eggs without a red lion stamp should not be eaten raw or lightly cooked)
  4. shellfish (don’t serve raw or lightly cooked)
  5. cows’ milk
  6. foods that contain gluten, including wheat, barley and rye
  7. nuts and peanuts (serve them crushed or ground)
  8. fish

See more about foods to avoid giving babies and young children.

These foods can be introduced from around 6 months as part of your baby’s diet, just love any other foods.

What to feed babies with food allergies

Once introduced and if tolerated, these foods should become part of your baby’s usual diet to minimise the risk of allergy.

Evidence has shown that delaying the introduction of peanut and hen’s eggs beyond 6 to 12 months may increase the risk of developing an allergy to these foods.

Lots of children outgrow their allergies to milk or eggs, but a peanut allergy is generally lifelong.

If your kid has a food allergy, read food labels carefully.

Avoid foods if you are not certain whether they contain the food your kid is allergic to.


Food additives and children

Food contains additives for numerous reasons, such as to preserve it, to help make it safe to eat for longer, and to give colour or texture.

All food additives go through strict safety testing before they can be used. Food labelling must clearly show additives in the list of ingredients, including their name or «E» number and their function, such as «colour» or «preservative».

A few people own adverse reactions to some food additives, love sulphites, but reactions to ordinary foods, such as milk or soya, are much more common.

Read more about food colours and hyperactivity.

What Are the Most Common Food Allergens?

A kid could be allergic to any food, but these eight common allergens account for 90% of every reactions in kids:

  • skin: itchy red bumps (hives); eczema; redness and swelling of the face or extremities; itching and swelling of the lips, tongue, or mouth (skin reactions are the most common type of reaction)
  • be more severe and involve more than one part of the body
  • soy
  • be extremely mild and only involve one part of the body, love hives on the skin
  • milk
  • tree nuts (such as walnuts and cashews)
  • fish
  • peanuts
  • gastrointestinal tract: stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • happen within a few minutes or up to 2 hours after contact with the food
  • eggs
  • shellfish (such as shrimp)
  • wheat
  • respiratory system: runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath
  • cardiovascular system: lightheadedness or fainting

In general, most kids with food allergies outgrow them.

Of those who are allergic to milk, about 80% will eventually outgrow the allergy. About two-thirds with allergies to eggs and about 80% with a wheat or soy allergy will outgrow those by the time they’re 5 years ancient. Other food allergies may be harder to outgrow.

What Happens in a Food Allergy Reaction?

Food allergy reactions can vary from person to person. Sometimes the same person can react differently at diverse times. So it’s extremely significant to quickly identify and treat food allergy reactions.

Reactions can:

  1. skin: itchy red bumps (hives); eczema; redness and swelling of the face or extremities; itching and swelling of the lips, tongue, or mouth (skin reactions are the most common type of reaction)
  2. gastrointestinal tract: stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  3. be more severe and involve more than one part of the body
  4. respiratory system: runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath
  5. be extremely mild and only involve one part of the body, love hives on the skin
  6. happen within a few minutes or up to 2 hours after contact with the food
  7. cardiovascular system: lightheadedness or fainting

Food allergy reactions can affect any of these four areas of the body:

In general, most kids with food allergies outgrow them.

Of those who are allergic to milk, about 80% will eventually outgrow the allergy. About two-thirds with allergies to eggs and about 80% with a wheat or soy allergy will outgrow those by the time they’re 5 years ancient. Other food allergies may be harder to outgrow.

What Happens in a Food Allergy Reaction?

Food allergy reactions can vary from person to person. Sometimes the same person can react differently at diverse times. So it’s extremely significant to quickly identify and treat food allergy reactions.

Reactions can:

  1. skin: itchy red bumps (hives); eczema; redness and swelling of the face or extremities; itching and swelling of the lips, tongue, or mouth (skin reactions are the most common type of reaction)
  2. gastrointestinal tract: stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  3. be more severe and involve more than one part of the body
  4. respiratory system: runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath
  5. be extremely mild and only involve one part of the body, love hives on the skin
  6. happen within a few minutes or up to 2 hours after contact with the food
  7. cardiovascular system: lightheadedness or fainting

Food allergy reactions can affect any of these four areas of the body:

  • trouble breathing
  • a drop in blood pressure, causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness (passing out)
  • a skin test.

    This test involves placing liquid extracts of food allergens on your child’s forearm or back, pricking the skin, and waiting to see if reddish raised spots (called wheals) form within 15 minutes. A positive test to a food only shows that your kid might be sensitive to that food.

  • swelling in the mouth
  • skin: itchy red bumps (hives); eczema; redness and swelling of the face or extremities; itching and swelling of the lips, tongue, or mouth (skin reactions are the most common type of reaction)
  • coughing
  • wheezing
  • the time it takes between eating a specific food and the start of symptoms
  • throat tightness
  • hoarseness
  • gastrointestinal tract: stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • respiratory system: runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath
  • hoarseness
  • whether any family members own allergies or conditions love eczema and asthma
  • doesn’t involve the immune system
  • itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  • cardiovascular system: lightheadedness or fainting
  • trouble breathing
  • blood tests to check the blood for IgE antibodies to specific foods
  • any symptoms from two or more body systems (skin, heart, lungs, etc.), such as hives and stomach pain
  • hives
  • throat feels tight
  • diarrhea
  • red spots
  • During this test, a person slowly gets increasing amounts of the potential food allergen to eat while being watched for symptoms by the doctor.

    The test must be done in an allergist’s office or hospital with access to immediate medical care and medicines because a life-threatening reaction could happen.

  • can be unpleasant but is rarely dangerous
  • your child’s symptoms
  • how often the reaction happens
  • can happen because a person can’t digest a substance, such as lactose
  • swelling
  • belly pain
  • any other combination of two or more symptoms that affect diverse parts of the body

Sometimes, an allergy can cause a severe reaction calledanaphylaxis, even if a previous reaction was mild.

Anaphylaxis might start with some of the same symptoms as a less severe reaction, but can quickly get worse. The person may own trouble breathing or pass out. More than one part of the body might be involved. If it isn’t treated, anaphylaxis can be life-threatening.

What Are Food Allergies?

Milk, eggs, soy, wheat, tree nuts, peanuts, fish, and shellfish are among the most common foods that cause allergies.

Food allergies can cause serious and even deadly reactions.

So it’s significant to know how to recognize an allergic reaction and to be prepared if one happens.

How Is a Food Allergy Diagnosed?

If your kid might own a food allergy, the doctor will enquire about:

  1. how often the reaction happens
  2. the time it takes between eating a specific food and the start of symptoms
  3. your child’s symptoms
  4. whether any family members own allergies or conditions love eczema and asthma

The doctor will glance for any other conditions that could cause the symptoms. For example, if your kid seems to own diarrhea after drinking milk, the doctor may check to see if lactose intolerance could be the cause.

Celiac disease — a condition in which a person cannot tolerate the protein gluten — also can cause similar symptoms.

The doctor might refer you to an (allergy specialist doctor), who will enquire more questions and do a physical exam. The allergist probably will order tests to assist make a diagnosis, such as:

  1. a skin test. This test involves placing liquid extracts of food allergens on your child’s forearm or back, pricking the skin, and waiting to see if reddish raised spots (called wheals) form within 15 minutes.

    A positive test to a food only shows that your kid might be sensitive to that food.

  2. blood tests to check the blood for IgE antibodies to specific foods

If the test results are unclear, the allergist may do a food challenge:

  1. During this test, a person slowly gets increasing amounts of the potential food allergen to eat while being watched for symptoms by the doctor. The test must be done in an allergist’s office or hospital with access to immediate medical care and medicines because a life-threatening reaction could happen.

More often, though, food challenge tests are done to see if people own outgrown an allergy.

Further information

Sheet final reviewed: 24 July
Next review due: 24 July

en españolAlergias alimentarias

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Food Allergy?

With a food allergy, the body reacts as though that specific food product is harmful.

As a result, the body’s immune system (which fights infection and disease) creates antibodies to fight the food .

Every time the person eats (or, in some cases, handles or breathes in) the food, the body releases chemicals love . This triggers allergic symptoms that can affect the respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, skin, or cardiovascular system.

Symptoms can include:

  1. vomiting
  2. hives
  3. coughing
  4. red spots
  5. wheezing
  6. belly pain
  7. throat tightness
  8. trouble breathing
  9. itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  10. swelling
  11. hoarseness
  12. diarrhea
  13. a drop in blood pressure, causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness (passing out)

People often confuse food allergies with food intolerance because of similar symptoms.

The symptoms of food intolerance can include burping, indigestion, gas, loose stools, headaches, nervousness, or a feeling of being "flushed." But food intolerance:

  1. can happen because a person can’t digest a substance, such as lactose
  2. doesn’t involve the immune system
  3. can be unpleasant but is rarely dangerous

How Are Food Allergies Treated?

If your kid has a food allergy, the allergist will assist you create a treatment plan. Treatment generally means avoiding the allergen and every the foods that contain it.

You’ll need to read food labels so you can avoid the allergen.

Makers of foods sold in the United States must state whether foods contain any of the top eight most common allergens: milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, or soy.

For more information on foods to avoid, check sites such as the Food Allergy Research and Education network (FARE).

There’s no cure for food allergies. But medicines can treat both minor and severe symptoms. Antihistamines might be used to treat symptoms such as hives, runny nose, or stomach pain from an allergic reaction.

If your kid has any helpful of serious food allergy, the doctor will desire him or her to carry an epinephrine auto-injector in case of an emergency.

An epinephrine auto-injector is a prescription medicine that comes in a little, easy-to-carry container.

It’s simple to use. Your doctor will show you how.

What to feed babies with food allergies

Kids who are ancient enough can be taught how to give themselves the injection. If they carry the epinephrine, it should be nearby, not left in a locker or in the nurse’s office.

Wherever your kid is, caregivers should always know where the epinephrine is, own simple access to it, and know how to give the shot. Staff at your child’s school should know about the allergy and own an action plan in put. Your child’s medicines should be accessible at every times.

Also consider having your kid wear a medical alert bracelet.

Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis that would require epinephrine include:

  1. swelling in the mouth
  2. trouble breathing
  3. hoarseness
  4. any symptoms from two or more body systems (skin, heart, lungs, etc.), such as hives and stomach pain
  5. throat feels tight
  6. any other combination of two or more symptoms that affect diverse parts of the body

Every second counts in an allergic reaction. If your kid starts having serious allergic symptoms, give the epinephrine auto-injector correct away.

Also give it correct away if the symptoms involve two diverse parts of the body, love hives with vomiting. Then call and take your kid to the emergency room. Your kid needs to be under medical supervision because even if the worst seems to own passed, a second wave of serious symptoms can happen.

It’s also a excellent thought to carry an over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamine for your kid, as this can assist treat mild allergy symptoms.

Use after — not as a replacement for — the epinephrine shot during life-threatening reactions.

If you ponder your kid is having an allergic reaction to a food, seek medical advice urgently as symptoms can worsen rapidly. If breathing is affected, call triple zero () and enquire for an ambulance.

Sometimes, an allergy can cause a severe reaction calledanaphylaxis, even if a previous reaction was mild.

What to feed babies with food allergies

Anaphylaxis might start with some of the same symptoms as a less severe reaction, but can quickly get worse. The person may own trouble breathing or pass out. More than one part of the body might be involved. If it isn’t treated, anaphylaxis can be life-threatening.

What Are Food Allergies?

Milk, eggs, soy, wheat, tree nuts, peanuts, fish, and shellfish are among the most common foods that cause allergies.

Food allergies can cause serious and even deadly reactions.

So it’s significant to know how to recognize an allergic reaction and to be prepared if one happens.

How Is a Food Allergy Diagnosed?

If your kid might own a food allergy, the doctor will enquire about:

  1. how often the reaction happens
  2. the time it takes between eating a specific food and the start of symptoms
  3. your child’s symptoms
  4. whether any family members own allergies or conditions love eczema and asthma

The doctor will glance for any other conditions that could cause the symptoms.

For example, if your kid seems to own diarrhea after drinking milk, the doctor may check to see if lactose intolerance could be the cause. Celiac disease — a condition in which a person cannot tolerate the protein gluten — also can cause similar symptoms.

The doctor might refer you to an (allergy specialist doctor), who will enquire more questions and do a physical exam. The allergist probably will order tests to assist make a diagnosis, such as:

  1. a skin test. This test involves placing liquid extracts of food allergens on your child’s forearm or back, pricking the skin, and waiting to see if reddish raised spots (called wheals) form within 15 minutes.

    A positive test to a food only shows that your kid might be sensitive to that food.

  2. blood tests to check the blood for IgE antibodies to specific foods

If the test results are unclear, the allergist may do a food challenge:

  1. During this test, a person slowly gets increasing amounts of the potential food allergen to eat while being watched for symptoms by the doctor. The test must be done in an allergist’s office or hospital with access to immediate medical care and medicines because a life-threatening reaction could happen.

More often, though, food challenge tests are done to see if people own outgrown an allergy.

Further information

Sheet final reviewed: 24 July
Next review due: 24 July

en españolAlergias alimentarias

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Food Allergy?

With a food allergy, the body reacts as though that specific food product is harmful.

As a result, the body’s immune system (which fights infection and disease) creates antibodies to fight the food .

Every time the person eats (or, in some cases, handles or breathes in) the food, the body releases chemicals love . This triggers allergic symptoms that can affect the respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, skin, or cardiovascular system.

Symptoms can include:

  1. vomiting
  2. hives
  3. coughing
  4. red spots
  5. wheezing
  6. belly pain
  7. throat tightness
  8. trouble breathing
  9. itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  10. swelling
  11. hoarseness
  12. diarrhea
  13. a drop in blood pressure, causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness (passing out)

People often confuse food allergies with food intolerance because of similar symptoms.

The symptoms of food intolerance can include burping, indigestion, gas, loose stools, headaches, nervousness, or a feeling of being "flushed." But food intolerance:

  1. can happen because a person can’t digest a substance, such as lactose
  2. doesn’t involve the immune system
  3. can be unpleasant but is rarely dangerous

How Are Food Allergies Treated?

If your kid has a food allergy, the allergist will assist you create a treatment plan. Treatment generally means avoiding the allergen and every the foods that contain it.

You’ll need to read food labels so you can avoid the allergen.

Makers of foods sold in the United States must state whether foods contain any of the top eight most common allergens: milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, or soy.

For more information on foods to avoid, check sites such as the Food Allergy Research and Education network (FARE).

There’s no cure for food allergies. But medicines can treat both minor and severe symptoms. Antihistamines might be used to treat symptoms such as hives, runny nose, or stomach pain from an allergic reaction.

If your kid has any helpful of serious food allergy, the doctor will desire him or her to carry an epinephrine auto-injector in case of an emergency.

An epinephrine auto-injector is a prescription medicine that comes in a little, easy-to-carry container.

It’s simple to use. Your doctor will show you how. Kids who are ancient enough can be taught how to give themselves the injection.

What to feed babies with food allergies

If they carry the epinephrine, it should be nearby, not left in a locker or in the nurse’s office.

Wherever your kid is, caregivers should always know where the epinephrine is, own simple access to it, and know how to give the shot. Staff at your child’s school should know about the allergy and own an action plan in put. Your child’s medicines should be accessible at every times. Also consider having your kid wear a medical alert bracelet.

Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis that would require epinephrine include:

  1. swelling in the mouth
  2. trouble breathing
  3. hoarseness
  4. any symptoms from two or more body systems (skin, heart, lungs, etc.), such as hives and stomach pain
  5. throat feels tight
  6. any other combination of two or more symptoms that affect diverse parts of the body

Every second counts in an allergic reaction. If your kid starts having serious allergic symptoms, give the epinephrine auto-injector correct away.

Also give it correct away if the symptoms involve two diverse parts of the body, love hives with vomiting. Then call and take your kid to the emergency room. Your kid needs to be under medical supervision because even if the worst seems to own passed, a second wave of serious symptoms can happen.

It’s also a excellent thought to carry an over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamine for your kid, as this can assist treat mild allergy symptoms.

Use after — not as a replacement for — the epinephrine shot during life-threatening reactions.

If you ponder your kid is having an allergic reaction to a food, seek medical advice urgently as symptoms can worsen rapidly. If breathing is affected, call triple zero () and enquire for an ambulance.


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