What to do for bee sting allergy

The best way to deal with a bee sting is to scrape it off with a sideways motion using a firm object such as the blade of a knife, a credit card, or even a finger nail. Attempt not to squeeze the venom sac. However, quick removal of the sting is more significant than how you do it. Scraping the sting off immediately will reduce the quantity of venom injected. Ice should immediately be applied to the area. Soothing creams and antihistamines may assist with the itching.

If the person who has been stung is known to react badly to bee stings a compression bandage should be applied to the arm or leg and the patient encouraged not to move.

Medical assist should be sought immediately. An injection of adrenaline, such as from an EpiPen, may be needed to overcome the reaction.


Allergen immunotherapy

It is possible for those who react badly to be de-sensitised to bee stings by allergen immunotherapy. Little amounts of purified venom are given at regular intervals over years.

What to do for bee sting allergy

This will own a 90 per cent chance of reducing the risks of a life-threatening reaction in those at risk.

People at risk of severe allergic reactions to bee stings should wear medical identification jewellery, and carry an EpiPen.


Prevention

Bees are attracted by strong smells and bright colours. They are most athletic on bright sunny days. Honey bees normally only sting when defending themselves. Most bee stings happen when they are stepped on by bare feet.

Watch out for thick patches of clover in lawns where children frolic. Avoid wearing perfume when exterior. Never attempt to remove a bee colony or nest yourself. Always call the experts in.

One of the most dangerous places to be stung by a bee is inside the mouth. The resulting swelling can block off breathing with fatal results. This generally happens as a result of having a drink exterior and not noticing a bee getting into it.

This can easily happen if drinking out of a can. Always use a straw if drinking from a can.


Step 2: Monitor for Signs of an Allergic Reaction

Nearly everyone, even people without a bee sting allergy, will experience symptoms of pain, redness, swelling, and itching at the site of the sting. These symptoms are not dangerous and can be treated as outlined under. However, if you were stung on the lips, tongue, inside your mouth or throat, then severe swelling at the sting site could become an emergency.

Symptoms of a more severe allergic reaction called anaphylaxis include but are not limited to:

  1. Upset stomach and perhaps nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramping, and diarrhea
  2. Fast heart rate and a sense of fainting (perhaps due to low blood pressure)
  3. Trouble breathing (coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath)
  4. Lightheadedness
  5. Skin rashes or swelling away from the sting site, such as hives, angioedema, itching without a rash, sweating, or flushing

These symptoms, if they're going to happen, generally start within a few minutes of getting stung.

When to Get Assist

If these more severe symptoms are present, get medical attention immediately, such as calling or going directly to the closest emergency room.

While waiting for emergency medical assist, if you own injectable epinephrine that was prescribed to you, use it immediately. Take an oral antihistamine (such as Benadryl, Zyrtec, Claritin, or Allegra) only if you are capable to swallow and don't own severe swelling of the tongue, lips, or throat. Choking on medicine could make an already dangerous situation much worse.

Some insect stings, particularly those from yellow jackets, develop into cellulitis (skin infection). If pain, swelling, or redness develops, worsens, or spreads after 2 to 3 days, or if you develop fever, chills, nausea, and vomiting, you should seek medical treatment.


Step 3: Treat Expected Side Effects

If your only symptoms are pain, redness, and swelling/itching at the site of the sting, and the bee sting was not on the face, then you're not likely to be experiencing a severe allergic reaction.

Consider taking a single dose of an oral antihistamine such as Benadryl, Allegra, Zyrtec, or Claritin as quickly as possible. This may assist the local reaction and possibly reduce the chance, or lessen the severity, of an allergic reaction occurring later. These medicines are available over-the-counter without a doctor’s prescription—just be certain to carefully follow the instructions on the package.

Continue to closely monitor yourself or the sting victim for signs of an allergic reaction, particularly for the first 30 to 60 minutes after getting stung. Most severe allergic reactions happen within this time period and would be unusual four hours or more after getting stung.

If signs of an allergic reaction develop, get medical attention immediately. Localized swelling, redness, and itching at the site of the sting may worsen over numerous hours to days. Treatment of local reactions may include applying ice packs and topical steroid creams to the sting site, as well as taking oral antihistamines and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen.

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Additional Reading

Most people will be stung by a bee at some time in their lives.

What to do for bee sting allergy

Generally a bee sting produces a painful, itchy swelling which may be bothersome for a few days.

But some people will own a more severe allergic reaction. This can range from generalised painful swelling of a whole limb (arm or leg) for a week or more, to an anaphylactic reaction affecting the whole body. Severe bee sting allergy can cause a rash over the body, swelling of the throat or tongue, restriction of breathing, diarrhoea, vomiting, a serious drop in blood pressure and even death.

A bees sting consists of a sharp barb with an attached bag of poison, or venom sac.

What to do for bee sting allergy

The poison from this venom sac will be pumped into the body for several minutes after the bee has departed. It is allergy to this venom that causes the allergic reaction.

Additional Reading

Most people will be stung by a bee at some time in their lives. Generally a bee sting produces a painful, itchy swelling which may be bothersome for a few days.

But some people will own a more severe allergic reaction.

This can range from generalised painful swelling of a whole limb (arm or leg) for a week or more, to an anaphylactic reaction affecting the whole body. Severe bee sting allergy can cause a rash over the body, swelling of the throat or tongue, restriction of breathing, diarrhoea, vomiting, a serious drop in blood pressure and even death.

A bees sting consists of a sharp barb with an attached bag of poison, or venom sac. The poison from this venom sac will be pumped into the body for several minutes after the bee has departed. It is allergy to this venom that causes the allergic reaction.


Step 1: Remove the Stinger as Quickly as Possible

Generally, only honeybees leave their stingers after a sting, because of the barbs on the stinger.

What to do for bee sting allergy

Removing the stinger quickly—ideally less than 10 seconds after being stung—is significant because this minimizes how much venom is injected. The method of removing the stinger, such as scraping or pinching, seems to be less significant, contrary to favorite belief. If you spend too much time trying to remove the stinger by gingerly scraping at it, and more than 30 seconds passes, every of the venom has already been injected.


Treating a Bee Sting Allergy

If you are not known to be allergic to bee stings but you were just stung by a bee (or another stinging insect such as a wasp, yellow jacket, or hornet), here are a few simple steps to monitor for an allergic reaction:


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