What to do for allergies when nothing works

Much of the confusion regarding the loss of a drug effect stems from the misuse of the terms "immunity" and "resistance."

Immunity is the body's defense against a harmful substance.

What to do for allergies when nothing works

Resistance describes the process wherein a bacteria, virus, or other disease-causing agent changes (mutates) and is capable to overcome the effects of the drug. Neither of these processes applies to changes in how certain allergy medications work.

With an allergy, the immune system overreacts to an otherwise harmless substance and floods the body with a chemical known as histamine. The main function of histamine is to trigger inflammation, the body's natural response to injury. It does so by dilating blood vessels so that immune cells can get closer to the site of an injury or infection.

In the absence of injury or infection, histamine can trigger an array of adverse symptoms, including itching, rash, sneezing, runny nose, stomach ache, nausea, and vomiting.

Allergy medications are used to counter these effects because they are capable to block (inhibit) the inflammatory process.

  1. Beta-agonists commonly used in asthma inhalers mimic the action of epinephrine (adrenaline) and relax constricted airways in the lungs.
  2. Corticosteroids work by tempering the immune response and reducing inflammation, either locally with topical ointments or sprays, or systemically with oral or injected medications.
  3. Antihistamines work by preventing histamine from attaching to cells of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and respiratory tract.
  4. Anticholinergics, also used in inhalers, work by blocking a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, thereby reducing bronchial spasms and constriction.

In none of these instances does a substance mutate or the immune system alters its natural response.

What happens instead is that the body develops a tolerance to the drug, particularly if overused.


A pharmacist can assist with hay fever

Speak to your pharmacist if you own hay fever.

They can give advice and propose the best treatments, love antihistamine drops, tablets or nasal sprays to assist with:

  1. itchy and watery eyes and sneezing
  2. a blocked nose

Find a pharmacy

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  1. your symptoms are getting worse
  2. your symptoms do not improve after taking medicines from the pharmacy


Understanding Drug Tolerance

In pharmacology, when certain drugs are overused, they can stop working as the body becomes progressively desensitized to their effects.

This is referred to as drug tolerance. While increasing the dosage may restore the drug action, the benefits tend to be short-lived.

There are two major reasons why this might occur:

  1. Dynamic tolerance describes the process where a cell becomes less responsive to a drug the longer it is exposed to it. In some ways, it is no diverse from the way that the taste receptors on our tongues adapt to extra-spicy foods if exposed to them repeatedly.
  2. Kinetic tolerance occurs when the body responds to the ongoing presence of a drug and begins to break it below and excrete it more actively, lowering the drug concentration.

With certain drugs, particularly psychoactive drugs, drug tolerance may be associated with drug dependence or addiction.

This is not so much the case with allergy medications since the developing tolerance reduces the efficacy of a drug rather than our need for it.


Treatments for hay fever from a GP

Your GP might prescribe steroids.

If steroids and other hay fever treatments do not work, your GP may refer you for immunotherapy.

This means you’ll be given little amounts of pollen as an injection or tablet to slowly build up your immunity to pollen.

This helpful of treatment generally starts in the winter about 3 months before the hay fever season begins.


What causes hay fever

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen, typically when it comes into contact with your mouth, nose, eyes and throat.

Pollen is a fine powder from plants.

Check the pollen forecast

Media final reviewed: 21 April 2017
Media review due: 21 April 2020

Sheet final reviewed: 21 December 2017
Next review due: 21 December 2020

Ah, glorious springtime. It brings flowers, warmer temperatures—and for numerous, incessant sneezes and sniffles. Everybody curses allergies as annoying at best, and some allergic reactions—such as anaphylaxis, which rapidly lowers blood pressure and closes the airways—can be fatal.

But a handful of researchers now propose that allergies may actually own evolved to protect us. Runny noses, coughs and itchy rashes hold toxic chemicals out of our bodies, they argue, and persuade us to steer clear of dangerous environments.

Most immunologists consider allergies to be misdirected immune reactions to innocuous substances such as pollen or peanuts. Viral and bacterial infections invoke what are called "type 1" immune responses, whereas allergies involve "type 2" responses, which are thought to own evolved to protect against large parasites.

Type 1 responses directly kill the pathogens and the human cells they infect; type 2 works by strengthening the body's protective barriers and promoting pest expulsion. The thought is that smaller pathogens can be offensively attacked and killed, but it's smarter to fight larger ones defensively.

But Ruslan Medzhitov, an immunobiologist at Yale University, has never accepted the thought of allergies as rogue soldiers from the body's parasite-fighting army.

Parasites and the substances that trigger allergies, called allergens, "share nothing in common," he says—first, there are an almost unlimited number of allergens. Second, allergic responses can be extremely fast—on the scale of seconds—and "a response to parasites doesn't own to be that fast," he says.

In a paper published April 26 in Nature, Medzhitov and his colleagues argue that allergies are triggered by potentially dangerous substances in the environment or food to protect us.

(Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group) As evidence, they cite research including a 2006 study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation reporting that key cells involved in allergic responses degrade and detoxify snake and bee venom. A 2010 study published in the same journal suggests that allergic responses to tick saliva prevent the pests from attaching and feeding. This mechanism, he argues, is distinct from the classic type 2 response the body uses to defend itself against internal parasites.

More generally, hated allergic symptoms hold unhealthy environmental irritants out of the body, Medzhitov posits.

"How do you defend against something you inhale that you don't want? You make mucus. You make a runny nose, you sneeze, you cough, and so forth. Or if it's on your skin, by inducing itching, you avoid it or you attempt to remove it by scratching it," he explains. Likewise, if you've ingested something allergenic, your body might react with vomiting. Finally, if a specific put or circumstance ramps up your allergies, you're likely to avoid it in the future.

"The thing about allergies is that as soon as you stop exposure to an allergen, every the symptoms are gone," he says.

Importantly, Medzhitov notes that although allergies are intended to be helpful, they are sometimes excessive and detrimental—the body can go too far. And allergies don't always make sense. "I would tell that food is still mostly innocuous," says Dale Umetsu, an immunologist at Children's Hospital Boston, yet "food allergies affect one in 12 kids." How is that protective? According to Medzhitov, foods may own proteins in them that are harmful or they might mimic potentially harmful substances. (With food, he says, there's often little consensus about what, exactly, the offending allergen is.) And one has to ponder of the evolutionary past, he adds: for our ancestors hundreds of thousands of years ago, numerous plants that looked love food were toxic, so allergies may own evolved to protect us from them.

Finally, he says that some allergies may develop through a "guilt by association" mechanism: An individual might develop an egg allergy after eating eggs in a polluted environment, for instance. "This is a type of detection by proxy—you use some cue, love smell, or a visual cue or taste, to indicate if a food is associated with something that's noxious. Next time you're exposed to it, you avoid it."

This still doesn't explain why some people are more allergy-prone than others. "Allergens are everywhere," says Erika von Mutius, an allergy specialist at Munich University Children's Hospital in Germany.

"So if this is a defense, why isn't everybody allergic?" According to Medzhitov, allergies may be more common in people with defects in other defensive tactics. For instance, 42 percent of people who own a mutation in a structural skin protein called filaggrin commonly experience allergic skin reactions. "If you don't own optimal physical barriers, you rely on a greater degree on allergic defenses," he says.

And what about the growing body of research suggesting that childhood environment shapes allergy risk? A 2011 study published in TheNew England Journal of Medicine reported that children who grow up on farms, where they are exposed to numerous microorganisms, are less likely than other kids to develop asthma and allergies.

This thought, known as the hygiene hypothesis, suggests that individuals who encounter a multitude of bacteria and viruses early in life invest more immune resources into type 1 responses at the cost of type 2 reactions, including allergies. Medzhitov maintains that this theory can co-exist with his own. "It's a diverse aspect of disease susceptibility that has to do with early programming," he says.

Ultimately, Medzhitov's theory raises more questions than it answers, but numerous consent that the basic tenets are plausible. "It stimulates us as scientists to draw up some new hypotheses," says Kari Nadeau, an immunologist at the Stanford School of Medicine.

"The hypotheses need to be tested and might not necessarily be confirmed, but at least this paper drives us to understand allergies better."

WHY ME?

We really don’t understand why one gets this disorder. Since the disorder occurs more frequently in adults, it has also been postulated that hormonal changes may be a factor. Others feel that global warming, increases in pollution, and the increasing number of chemicals in our daily life may lead to the growing quantity of VMR. There is no firm proof that any one of these is definitely the cause of vasomotor rhinitis.

The significant thing is that the disorder is not inherited, does not seem to run in families, and has nothing at every to do with allergies. Because of this, there is no cure for this disease and management is primarily avoidance and treatment with medications. Your doctor may use similar medications as those used for allergic rhinitis but they may not work as well. Furthermore, higher doses may be needed.

IF IT’S NOT AN ALLERGY, THEN WHAT IS IT?

Vasomotor rhinitis produces numerous symptoms which are extremely similar to the symptoms of nasal allergy.

The difference is that this disorder is not caused by the allergic antibody and allergy skin tests are generally negative. Occasionally positive skin tests may be observed and patients may own a mixture of allergic and non-allergic rhinitis. If a nasal smear is performed, there are generally no allergy cells or «eosinophils» in the nasal secretions in patients with vasomotor rhinitis.

The cause of the symptoms of vasomotor rhinitis is not totally understood. Nevertheless, it causes a grand deal of chronic nasal problems. Currently, it is felt that the disorder is due to changes in the blood vessels of the nose, producing swelling of the mucosa or lining of the nose which in turn produces chronic nasal obstruction and nasal discharge.

This is why the disorder is referred to as vasomotor rhinitis; the «vaso» refers to «vascular» or «blood vessels» and «motor» refers to the nerves supplying these blood vessels controlling whether they swell up (dilate) or shrink below (constrict). The nose is richly supplied with blood vessels which enhance its function as a sensory organ and as a filtration system for the air we breathe. These blood vessels are supplied by opposing sets of nerves which automatically control their dilation and con­striction.

In most people, there is an even balance and no problems are encountered with the nose.

What to do for allergies when nothing works

For some reason, people with vasomotor rhinitis own an imbalance of the nerve supply to the nose with the finish result being that the blood vessels tend to swell up (dilate) to a wide variety of non-specific things which we own already mentioned.

In other words, VMR is due to extremely sensitive nerve endings, that when irritated lead to the congestion and stuffy nose frequently observed in allergic rhinitis or hay fever. However, the process has nothing to do with the allergic antibody IgE.

What causes hay fever

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen, typically when it comes into contact with your mouth, nose, eyes and throat.

Pollen is a fine powder from plants.

Check the pollen forecast

Media final reviewed: 21 April 2017
Media review due: 21 April 2020

Sheet final reviewed: 21 December 2017
Next review due: 21 December 2020

Ah, glorious springtime. It brings flowers, warmer temperatures—and for numerous, incessant sneezes and sniffles. Everybody curses allergies as annoying at best, and some allergic reactions—such as anaphylaxis, which rapidly lowers blood pressure and closes the airways—can be fatal. But a handful of researchers now propose that allergies may actually own evolved to protect us.

What to do for allergies when nothing works

Runny noses, coughs and itchy rashes hold toxic chemicals out of our bodies, they argue, and persuade us to steer clear of dangerous environments.

Most immunologists consider allergies to be misdirected immune reactions to innocuous substances such as pollen or peanuts. Viral and bacterial infections invoke what are called "type 1" immune responses, whereas allergies involve "type 2" responses, which are thought to own evolved to protect against large parasites.

Type 1 responses directly kill the pathogens and the human cells they infect; type 2 works by strengthening the body's protective barriers and promoting pest expulsion. The thought is that smaller pathogens can be offensively attacked and killed, but it's smarter to fight larger ones defensively.

But Ruslan Medzhitov, an immunobiologist at Yale University, has never accepted the thought of allergies as rogue soldiers from the body's parasite-fighting army.

Parasites and the substances that trigger allergies, called allergens, "share nothing in common," he says—first, there are an almost unlimited number of allergens. Second, allergic responses can be extremely fast—on the scale of seconds—and "a response to parasites doesn't own to be that fast," he says.

In a paper published April 26 in Nature, Medzhitov and his colleagues argue that allergies are triggered by potentially dangerous substances in the environment or food to protect us. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group) As evidence, they cite research including a 2006 study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation reporting that key cells involved in allergic responses degrade and detoxify snake and bee venom.

A 2010 study published in the same journal suggests that allergic responses to tick saliva prevent the pests from attaching and feeding. This mechanism, he argues, is distinct from the classic type 2 response the body uses to defend itself against internal parasites.

More generally, hated allergic symptoms hold unhealthy environmental irritants out of the body, Medzhitov posits. "How do you defend against something you inhale that you don't want? You make mucus. You make a runny nose, you sneeze, you cough, and so forth.

Or if it's on your skin, by inducing itching, you avoid it or you attempt to remove it by scratching it," he explains. Likewise, if you've ingested something allergenic, your body might react with vomiting. Finally, if a specific put or circumstance ramps up your allergies, you're likely to avoid it in the future. "The thing about allergies is that as soon as you stop exposure to an allergen, every the symptoms are gone," he says.

Importantly, Medzhitov notes that although allergies are intended to be helpful, they are sometimes excessive and detrimental—the body can go too far.

And allergies don't always make sense. "I would tell that food is still mostly innocuous," says Dale Umetsu, an immunologist at Children's Hospital Boston, yet "food allergies affect one in 12 kids." How is that protective? According to Medzhitov, foods may own proteins in them that are harmful or they might mimic potentially harmful substances. (With food, he says, there's often little consensus about what, exactly, the offending allergen is.) And one has to ponder of the evolutionary past, he adds: for our ancestors hundreds of thousands of years ago, numerous plants that looked love food were toxic, so allergies may own evolved to protect us from them.

Finally, he says that some allergies may develop through a "guilt by association" mechanism: An individual might develop an egg allergy after eating eggs in a polluted environment, for instance. "This is a type of detection by proxy—you use some cue, love smell, or a visual cue or taste, to indicate if a food is associated with something that's noxious. Next time you're exposed to it, you avoid it."

This still doesn't explain why some people are more allergy-prone than others. "Allergens are everywhere," says Erika von Mutius, an allergy specialist at Munich University Children's Hospital in Germany.

"So if this is a defense, why isn't everybody allergic?" According to Medzhitov, allergies may be more common in people with defects in other defensive tactics. For instance, 42 percent of people who own a mutation in a structural skin protein called filaggrin commonly experience allergic skin reactions. "If you don't own optimal physical barriers, you rely on a greater degree on allergic defenses," he says.

And what about the growing body of research suggesting that childhood environment shapes allergy risk? A 2011 study published in TheNew England Journal of Medicine reported that children who grow up on farms, where they are exposed to numerous microorganisms, are less likely than other kids to develop asthma and allergies.

This thought, known as the hygiene hypothesis, suggests that individuals who encounter a multitude of bacteria and viruses early in life invest more immune resources into type 1 responses at the cost of type 2 reactions, including allergies. Medzhitov maintains that this theory can co-exist with his own. "It's a diverse aspect of disease susceptibility that has to do with early programming," he says.

Ultimately, Medzhitov's theory raises more questions than it answers, but numerous consent that the basic tenets are plausible. "It stimulates us as scientists to draw up some new hypotheses," says Kari Nadeau, an immunologist at the Stanford School of Medicine.

"The hypotheses need to be tested and might not necessarily be confirmed, but at least this paper drives us to understand allergies better."

IS IT AN ALLERGY?

You may ponder you own allergies because you own nasal congestion, runny nose, and maybe even sneezing. However, when you doctor performs allergy tests you are told that there is no evidence of allergy. What could this possibly be?

Vasomotor rhinitis is a disorder which is frequently seen in allergy practice but has nothing at every to do with true allergic disease. See the sections on allergic disease to understand how the allergic antibody, or IgE, works and how this leads to allergy symptoms.

What to do for allergies when nothing works

Vasomotor rhinitis is a poorly understood disorder which mimics numerous of the symptoms of nasal allergy, but has a completely diverse basis. Failure to recognize these differences has led to a grand deal of misunderstanding about this disorder.

To understand vasomotor rhinitis (VMR) otherwise known as non-allergic rhinitis it is worthwhile to first discuss allergic rhinitis. Nasal allergies, or allergic rhinitis, own two distinct clinical forms. One form is referred to as «hayfever» or seasonal allergic rhinitis, which occurs at a specific time or season of the year due to exposure to «pollens» or «allergens» such as grass and ragweed.

Another form is associated with nasal symptoms throughout the year without definite seasonal variation, and more commonly is due to the allergens such as home dust, mold, mildew, and animal dander. This year circular form is called perennial allergic rhinitis. Patients may frequently own both.

Nasal allergies tend to happen in families with a predisposition to «react» to exposure to «allergens» by producing antibodies against these «allergens».

In other words, there is a genetic component to allergies, so if someone in your family has allergies you may be at increased risk. These «antibodies», called IgE (Immunoglobulin E) are produced in the blood stream, but also happen in the skin, which makes it possible to protest these «antibodies» by allergy skin tests. A positive test produces a large red area and possibly even a «hive» at the site of the skin test. The reactions seen in the skin mirror the reactions which happen in other organs such as the eyes and nose.

The basis of the nasal symptoms in allergic individuals is due to the interaction of the «allergens», or the things that you are allergic to such as grass pollen, with the antibodies produced against them.

Once this interaction takes put there is recruitment of other allergy cells into the site of the allergic reaction. These cells are a type of white blood cells called «eosinophils». In the case of nasal allergies they can be found in the nasal cavity and secretions by looking at a nasal smear. This is done with a q-tip placed into the nose and a little sample or smear is taken to be looked at under the microscope. Nasal smears are rarely done during the evaluation of nasal allergies exterior of research.

The symptoms of nasal allergy generally include runny nose and nasal congestion, and are generally associated with frequent sneezing episodes and itching of the nose, eyes, ears, and roof of the mouth on exposure to an «allergen».

Other evidence of allergy frequently is present in the same individuals, such as asthma or eczema. Treatment of these allergic disorders involves avoidance of the allergens when possible, nasal sprays, antihistamines, and sometimes «allergy shots» or «immunotherapy» to reduce sensitivity to those allergens which cannot be avoided completely.

Patients with VMR may own extremely similar symptoms and goes years treating themselves for presumed allergies. In fact, VMR is frequently missed or misdiagnosed as allergies by patients and primary care providers same.

What to do for allergies when nothing works

It is significant to make the correct diagnosis, both for education about avoidance as well as for treatment options.

TRIGGERS AND IRRITANTS WHICH AGGRAVATE VASOMOTOR RHINITIS

The main trigger for VMR is changes in the weather, and changes in the barometric pressure. You may notice that you get significant nasal congestion or stuff nose when there is a front moving in, with a rain storm or on days with changes in the humidity. This is essentially due to sensitive nerve endings in the nasal passages leading to over reaction that results in swelling of blood vessels.

This leads to the congestion, runny nose, and post nasal drip found in VMR.

In addition to changes in the weather, there are several chemicals and smells that serve as irritants and may worsen the symptoms of VMR. In specific, this non-specific reactivity maybe aggravated by some of the following:

1. Highly scented cosmetics such as cologne and perfumes.

2. Cigarette or other types of tobacco smoke.

3.

What to do for allergies when nothing works

Smoke from fireplaces and environmental smoke such as a forest fire or brush fire.

4. Strongly scented soaps, and shampoos.

5. Room deodorants, paints and varnishes, insecticides, and bug sprays.

6.

What to do for allergies when nothing works

Plants with a strong perfume such as roses, violets, lilacs, goldenrods, and crysanthemums.

7. Kerosene, lighter fluid, fuel oil, and gas fumes.

8. Dust particles.

9. Pollution.

If there is expected unavoidable intense exposure to any of the above, as well as any strong fumes, smoke, paint odors, household odors, industrial exposure, or dust, the use of a mask over the nose and mouth during this exposure is recommended. These masks can be obtained from the hardware store. However, there are times when triggers or irritants simply can not be avoided, such as changes in the weather.

These irritants are not capable of acting as «allergens» or causing «antibodies» love we see with true allergies.

The symptoms of vasomotor rhinitis are thus due to a completely diverse trigger and mechanism than nasal allergies.

WHAT CAN BE DONE?

Unfortunately, the disorder of vasomotor rhinitis cannot be cured at the present time but represents a disease with a protracted course of chronic nasal symptoms. Management is focused on managing the symptoms of nasal congestion, runny nose, and post nasal drip. There is no use for allergy injections in the setting of VMR as patients do not own an allergy.

There are some general measures which may reduce your symptoms of vasomotor rhinitis, and are as significant as specific medications in the overall management of this problem.

Obviously, avoidance of things which are known to precipitate symptoms should be encouraged.

What to do for allergies when nothing works

One can not avoid changes in the weather but avoidance of strong odors and especially smoke may be helpful. Almost every patients require some form of medication to improve symptoms.

Other non-specific irritants should also be avoided. This is particularly true of home dust which is a strong irritant in numerous patients with vasomotor rhinitis. Instructions for avoidance of home dust will be given separately. Ingestion of alcoholic beverages, particularly beer and wine, often aggravate the symptoms of vasomotor rhinitis and should be recognized as possible factors to be avoided. Occasionally, drugs you may be taking for other reasons, such as aspirin and drugs for high blood pressure such as Reserpine and Propranalol, may make these symptoms worse.

If you are taking other medications you should discuss each with your doctor to see if they are a factor.

The most common medications include nose drops and decongestant tablets. The over the counter nose drops that are vasoconstrictors (shrink the blood vessel in the nose) such as Afrin, Neosynephrine, and others may produce a dramatic improvement in symptoms. Unfortunately, frequent use of these sprays irritates the nose and eventually does more harm than excellent. When used more than 3 to 5 days patients develop a rebound of symptoms and an increased dependence on the sprays.

In general, the over the counter nose sprays should be avoided as controller medications for VMR, given the risk of rebound and «nasal addiction».

Specific treatment of vasomotor rhinitis involves the istration of «decongestants». These work by shrinking below the blood vessels in the nose. These medications can be in the form or a prescription nasal spray or a tablet taken by mouth. Of the currently approved prescription nasal sprays only a nasal antihistamine spray (Astelin) has been proven in studies for the FDA to treat the symptoms of VMR. However, your doctor may start with a nasal steroid since it may also decrease the inflammation in the nasal passage found in VMR.

Decongestant tablets (like pseudofed) and combination antihistamine-decongestant tablets work better than pure antihistamines. In fact, over the counter antihistamines love benadryl, zyrtec and claritin own not been shown to work well for VMR as these products tend to treat allergy. Chronic daily, therapy seems to work better than intermittent therapy. However, the decongestant tablets can lead to potential problems such as high blood pressure, other heart problems. Therefore, treatment with nasal sprays is encouraged and patients may use oral decongestants as periodic save therapy for times of severe symptoms. Furthermore, you will not develop rebound or «nasal addiction» to the prescription nasal sprays and these are generally considered some of the safest medications that you may take.

Treatment of complicating diseases such as nasal polyps, chronic sinusitis, and nasal septal deviation often require cooperation between the allergist and the ear­nose-and-throat physicians.

In addition, if you do own allergies, avoidance of treatment of the allergic responses will assist with your over every symptoms.

DON’T GET DISCOURAGED! Although we can’t cure the disorder, it can generally be controlled with medications. You may own to attempt a few diverse types of sprays before you discover the one the works for you. Your best efforts should be to discover a excellent allergist who can assist and guide you through this process.

One of the most common complaints heard from allergy sufferers is that certain allergy drugs will stop working for them over time.

This may happen after months or years of use and is most common among people who own chronic allergy symptoms.

Some people will insist that they've developed an "immunity" to the medications or own become "drug-resistant" in the same that they can become resistant to antibiotics.

What actually happens is that the body no longer reacts to the drug in the same way. A worsening of your condition could also be to blame.


How to treat hay fever yourself

There’s currently no cure for hay fever and you cannot prevent it.

But you can do things to ease your symptoms when the pollen count is high.

Do

  1. vacuum regularly and dust with a damp cloth
  2. stay indoors whenever possible
  3. wear wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen getting into your eyes
  4. hold windows and doors shut as much as possible
  5. shower and change your clothes after you own been exterior to wash pollen off
  6. put Vaseline around your nostrils to trap pollen
  7. purchase a pollen filter for the air vents in your car and a vacuum cleaner with a special HEPA filter

Don't

  1. do not dry clothes exterior – they can catch pollen
  2. do not smoke or be around smoke – it makes your symptoms worse
  3. do not spend too much time exterior
  4. do not hold unused flowers in the home
  5. do not cut grass or stroll on grass
  6. do not let pets into the home if possible – they can carry pollen indoors

Allergy UK has more tips on managing hay fever.


Check if you own hay fever

Symptoms of hay fever include:

  1. earache
  2. pain around your temples and forehead
  3. itchy, red or watery eyes
  4. loss of smell
  5. headache
  6. sneezing and coughing
  7. itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears
  8. a runny or blocked nose
  9. feeling tired

If you own asthma, you might also:

  1. be short of breath
  2. have a tight feeling in your chest
  3. wheeze and cough

Hay fever will final for weeks or months, unlike a freezing, which generally goes away after 1 to 2 weeks.


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