What symptoms do allergies cause

Since allergic cough is caused by totally diverse factors, it requires a completely diverse treatment, which typically involves the following:

  1. Taking antihistamines, which inhibits the release of histamines and thus, relieves the symptoms such as stuffy nose, runny nose, and swollen nasal passages.
  2. Taking nasal steroids, which also ease the inflammation and irritation along the nasal passageway, keeping the patient comfortable.

  3. Taking decongestants, which relieves stuffy and runny nose.
  4. Avoiding allergens or irritants your body is sensitive to; the most common allergens are pollen, mould, animal dander, and dust mites.
  5. Undergoing immunotherapy, which means getting allergy shots or little doses of the substance you are allergic to, so that as the dosage increases, the body develops a tolerance to the said substance.

Allergic cough is rarely a serious condition, although its symptoms can be extremely inconvenient and uncomfortable, especially if the patient does not seek medical assistance.

If the allergy is not managed properly, there is a risk of developing asthma. So even if allergy symptoms are extremely mild, it is still best to see a doctor to seek relief from symptoms as well as long-term protection from complications.

What symptoms do allergies cause

References:

  1. Wheatley L., Togias A. (). “Allergic Rhinitis.” The New England Journal of Medicine.
  2. Sylvester D., Karkos P., Vaughan C., Johnston J., et al. (). “Chronic cough, reflux, postnasal drip syndrome, and the otolaryngologist.” International Journal of Otolaryngology.
  3. Tarlo S., Lemiere C. (). “Occupational Asthma.” The New England Journal of Medicine.
  4. Micallef RE. (). “Effect of terbutaline sulphate in chronic allergic cough.” British Medical Journal.
  5. Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonary Medicine Journals

What Are the Symptoms of an Allergy?

An allergy occurs when the body’s immune system sees a substance as harmful and overreacts to it.

The symptoms that result are an allergic reaction. The substances that cause allergic reactions are allergens. Allergens can get into your body numerous ways to cause an allergic reaction.

  1. You can ingest allergens by mouth. This includes food and medicines you eat or swallow.
  2. Your body can own allergens injected into it. This includes medicine given by needle and venom from insect stings and bites.

  3. You can inhale allergens into your nose and your lungs. Many are little enough to float through the air. Examples are pollen, home dust, mold spores, cat and dog dander and latex dust.
  4. Your skin can absorb allergens. Plants such as poison ivy, sumac and oak can cause reactions when touched.

    What symptoms do allergies cause

    Latex, metals, and ingredients in beauty care and household products are other examples.


Main allergy symptoms

Common symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  1. wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  2. swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  3. tummy pain, feeling ill, vomiting or diarrhoea
  4. a raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  5. itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  6. sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  7. dry, red and cracked skin

The symptoms vary depending on what you’re allergic to and how you come into contact with it.

For example, you may have a runny nose if exposed to pollen, develop a rash if you own a skin allergy, or feel sick if you eat something you’re allergic to.

See your GP if you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something.

They can assist determine whether the symptoms are caused by an allergy or another condition.

Read more about diagnosing allergies.


Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November
Next review due: 22 November

en españolAlergia a la leche en bebés

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Milk Allergy?

In children who show symptoms shortly after they own milk, an allergic reaction can cause:

  1. throat tightness
  2. diarrhea
  3. swelling
  4. hives
  5. itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  6. coughing
  7. hoarseness
  8. trouble breathing
  9. wheezing
  10. vomiting
  11. stomach upset
  12. a drop in blood pressure causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness

The severity of allergic reactions to milk can vary.

The same kid can react differently with each exposure. This means that even though one reaction was mild, the next could be more severe and even life-threatening.

Children also can have:

  1. an intolerance to milk in which symptoms — such as loose stools, blood in the stool, refusal to eat, or irritability or colic — appear hours to days later
  2. lactose intolerance, which is when the body has trouble digesting milk

If you’re not certain if your kid has an intolerance versus an allergy, talk to your doctor.

How Is a Milk Allergy Diagnosed?

If you ponder your baby is allergic to milk, call your baby’s doctor.

What symptoms do allergies cause

He or she will enquire you questions and talk to you about what’s going on. After the doctor examines your baby, some stool tests and blood tests might be ordered. The doctor may refer you to an allergist (a doctor who specializes in treating allergies).

The allergist might do skin testing. In skin testing, the doctor or nurse will put a tiny bit of milk protein on the skin, then make a little scratch on the skin. If your kid reacts to the allergen, the skin will swell a little in that area love an insect bite.

If the allergist finds that your baby is at risk for a serious allergic reaction, epinephrine auto-injectors will be prescribed.

If Your Kid Has an Allergic Reaction

If your kid has symptoms of an allergic reaction, follow the food allergy action plan your doctor gave you.

If your kid has symptoms of a serious reaction (like swelling of the mouth or throat or difficulty breathing, or symptoms involving two diverse parts of the body, love hives with vomiting):

  1. Give the epinephrine auto-injector correct away.

    Every second counts in an allergic reaction.

  2. Then,call or take your kid to the emergency room. Your kid needs to be under medical supervision because, even if the worst seems to own passed, a second wave of serious symptoms can happen.

What Is a Milk Allergy?

When a baby is allergic to milk, it means that his or herimmune system, which normally fights infections, overreacts to proteins in cow’s milk.

Every time the kid has milk, the body thinks these proteins are harmful invaders and works hard to fight them. This causes an allergic reaction in which the body releases chemicals love .

Cow’s milk is in most baby formulas. Babies with a milk allergy often show their first symptoms days to weeks after they first get cow milk-based formula. Breastfed infants own a lower risk of having a milk allergy than formula-fed babies.

People of any age can own a milk allergy, but it’s more common in young children.

Numerous kids outgrow it, but some don’t.

If your baby has a milk allergy, hold two epinephrine auto-injectors on hand in case of a severe reaction (called anaphylaxis). An epinephrine auto-injector is an easy-to-use prescription medicine that comes in a container about the size of a large pen. Your doctor will show you how to use it.

Avoiding a Milk Allergy Reaction

If You’re Breastfeeding

If your breastfed baby has a milk allergy, talk to the allergist before changing your diet.

If You’re Formula Feeding

If you’re formula feeding, your doctor may advise you to switch to an extensively hydrolyzed formulaor an amino acid-based formula in which the proteins are broken below into particles so that the formula is less likely to trigger an allergic reaction.

You also might see "partially hydrolyzed" formulas, but these aren’t truly hypoallergenic and can lead to a significant allergic reaction.

If you’re concerned about a milk allergy, it’s always best to talk with your child’s doctor and work together to select a formula that’s safe for your baby.

Do not attempt to make your own formula.

Commercial formulas are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug istration (FDA) and created through a extremely specialized process that cannot be duplicated at home. Other types of milk that might be safe for an older kid with a milk allergyare not safe for infants.

If you own any questions or concerns, talk with your child’s doctor.

What is a Food Allergy? There Are Diverse Types of Allergic Reactions to Foods


Key Symptoms

There are key differences in the symptoms of a cough associated with the common freezing and allergic cough.

A cough caused by an allergy tends to:

  1. Lasts for days to months, as endless as the allergens are present
  2. May happen any time of the year, unlike common freezing, which happen most often in colder seasons
  3. Cause sudden symptoms that start as soon as the patient becomes exposed to the allergen

While allergic cough can also be accompanied by a runny nose, itchy and watery eyes, and sore throat, it is never accompanied by fever and body aches.

If you own a cough and you are running a fever, it is likely that the cough is caused by the common freezing. The common freezing also extremely rarely lasts longer than 14 days, so if a cough does not seem to go away after two weeks and does not seem to be responding to freezing treatments and remedies, then it is time to glance into the possibility of having allergies.

Allergic cough can also be accompanied by sinus and middle ear infections. These are not considered as symptoms, but as indirect effects of the allergic reaction. Due to the swelling in the nasal passageways, the sinuses become highly sensitive, thus raising the risk of sinus infection, also known as sinusitis.

The symptoms of sinus infections include pain around the sinuses (which affects the forehead, upper part and either sides of the nose, upper jaw and upper teeth, cheekbones, and between the eyes), sinus discharge, headache, sore throat, and severe congestion.

However, allergic cough, as well as other symptoms of allergies, can also be outgrown. Most people discover that when they enter middle age, their symptoms become less common even when they become exposed to allergens. This is mainly due to the weakening of the immune system and its inability to react as strongly as it used to.

However, this does not mean that the allergy itself is gone. Allergies to certain types of food, bee stings, and latex are the ones that are hardest to outgrow.


If your kid has symptoms after eating certain foods, he or she may own a food allergy.

A food allergy occurs when the body’s immune system sees a certain food as harmful and reacts by causing symptoms.

This is an allergic reaction. Foods that cause allergic reactions are allergens.

Two Categories of Food Allergies

  • Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  • Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  • Skin rash, itching, hives
  • Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Non-IgE mediated. Other parts of the body’s immune system react to a certain food. This reaction causes symptoms, but does not involve an IgE antibody. Someone can own both IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated food allergies.
  • Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated. Symptoms result from the body’s immune system making antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies.

    These IgE antibodies react with a certain food.

  • Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat. The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain. Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  2. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  3. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  4. Skin rash, itching, hives
  5. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild.

Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously. Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis). This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine. This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis. The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods.

For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish. Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk. The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods. For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods.

Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables. So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas. That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue. Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting. Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food.

In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract. Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed.

What symptoms do allergies cause

In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction. Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy.

Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus. The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat.

The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy. It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours. Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height.

What symptoms do allergies cause

Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk.

This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools. Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December

Definition & Overview

Allergic cough is a term used to distinguish cough caused by allergies from cough caused by the common freezing. Cough is generally accompanied by a runny nose and nasal congestion, and these symptoms happen simultaneously when a person is suffering from a common freezing or allergic reaction.

It is sometimes hard to diagnose and treat a cough because patients are uncertain as to what exactly causes it. As a result, they may take incorrect medications and fail to seek proper medical attention.

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat. The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain. Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  2. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  3. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  4. Skin rash, itching, hives
  5. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild.

Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously. Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis). This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine. This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis.

The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods. For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish. Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk.

The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods. For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods.

Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables. So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas. That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue. Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting. Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food. In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract.

Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed. In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction. Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy.

They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy. Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus.

The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat.

What symptoms do allergies cause

The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy. It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours.

What symptoms do allergies cause

Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height. Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk.

This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools. Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December

Definition & Overview

Allergic cough is a term used to distinguish cough caused by allergies from cough caused by the common freezing. Cough is generally accompanied by a runny nose and nasal congestion, and these symptoms happen simultaneously when a person is suffering from a common freezing or allergic reaction.

It is sometimes hard to diagnose and treat a cough because patients are uncertain as to what exactly causes it. As a result, they may take incorrect medications and fail to seek proper medical attention.


Cause of Condition

Allergic cough is primarily caused by an overactive immune system responding excessively to certain substances that the body becomes exposed to. This occurs when the body mistakes harmless substances for harmful ones, and thus initiates a defense system to ward them off.

This causes the release of the chemical called histamine, which the body releases when a patient is suffering from a freezing. Histamine is responsible for runny noses, coughing, sneezing, and swelling of the nasal passages, so the patient starts experiencing cold-like symptoms even in the absence of the common freezing. This is when allergic cough comes in.

There is no one cause behind every allergic reactions, but some people seem more prone to them than others.

What symptoms do allergies cause

It generally runs in families, so people with a family history of allergies own a greater chance of developing allergic cough. Studies show that children with one allergic parent own a 33% chance of developing allergies; this number increases to 70% if both parents are allergic.

Allergic cough is also heavily influenced by external factors. It may take an extreme pollen season or moving into a new moldy environment to cause flare-ups to become even worse than normal.

The body also reacts to diverse allergens; it may be capable to flag below some allergens and defend itself, but it may also drop prey to other allergens.

The body generally reacts to the allergens by activating mast cells; it is at this point that the symptoms such as allergic cough start. Once the mast cells burst, the body will be overflowing with histamine. The exposure to the allergen will affect how endless the symptoms will be present, and the quantity of exposure will also affect the types and severity of symptoms. This is why some people are capable to tolerate consuming something or getting exposed to something they are allergic from, but the body reacts when the exposure is continuous, extended, or in excess of what it can handle. This means that there is a specific threshold for triggering allergic cough.


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