What is the symptoms of skin allergy

What does serious skin breakdown glance like?


Main allergy symptoms

Common symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  1. itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  2. tummy pain, feeling ill, vomiting or diarrhoea
  3. wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  4. sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  5. a raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  6. swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  7. dry, red and cracked skin

The symptoms vary depending on what you’re allergic to and how you come into contact with it.

For example, you may have a runny nose if exposed to pollen, develop a rash if you own a skin allergy, or feel sick if you eat something you’re allergic to.

See your GP if you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something. They can assist determine whether the symptoms are caused by an allergy or another condition.

Read more about diagnosing allergies.


Identifying and treating minor skin breakdown

Treating redness or minor skin breakdown

If the skin is open, contact your health care provider for wound care instructions. These instructions will generally include cleaning the area with soap and water or a saline solution, keeping the area dry, and eliminating the cause of the problem.

Do not use hydrogen peroxide or iodine as these products damage new skin cells in the wound. They may prescribe special dressing that will optimize healing. If not, cover the area with a non-stick dressing, such as a Telfa pad to protect it from clothing. Change the dressing one to two times per day or if it gets soiled. Check your skin frequently to be certain the area is not getting worse. Minor burns can also cause blistering and can be treated in the same manner.

If the burn covers a large surface area, you should seek care in the emergency room. Once a treatment plan has been established, you must identify and attempt to remove the source of the irritation to the affected area as much as possible.

Is the area of damage under a brace?

If redness persists greater than 20 minutes after removing the brace, do not wear the brace. Own your therapist or orthotist assess the brace to see if it can be adjusted or whether it will need to be remade.

Children may need adjustments or replacement of braces as often as every four to six months during growth spurts. Braces will often require adjustment, if you own lost or gained weight, own increased spasticity, decreased range of motion or worsening scoliosis.

Is the damage being caused by pressure during sitting?

Pressure areas caused by sitting often happen on your ischeal tuberocities (sitting bones), lower back, shoulder blades or the back of the heels.

What is the symptoms of skin allergy

If the skin sore is being caused by sitting, check your wheelchair cushion. Do you own a pressure relieving cushion prescribed by your health care provider? Is it inflated correctly? Some cushions require frequent monitoring of inflation and can leak. Could the cushion be placed backward in the chair? Is it in excellent repair? Some cushions own gel in them that can get hard or squished out of put. If you own a therapeutic cushion and are still having difficulty with pressure on your sitting bones, see if you can attempt diverse cushions with pressure mapping. Pressure mapping equipment allows clinicians to visually identify your specific pressure areas when sitting on diverse cushions.

Then the cushion that works best for you can be ordered. Pressure mapping can also be helpful, if you own a condition that can make seating hard. Conditions, such as scoliosis or a dislocated hip can make the pressure on you sitting bones unequal. Depending on how bad the skin breakdown is you may need to stay out of your wheelchair for a period of time to permit the area to heal.

What does minor skin breakdown glance like?

Skin breakdown starts out as a red or purple spot on fair skin or a shiny, purple, blue or darker spot on dark skin, which does not fade or go away within 20 minutes.

When you press on the spot with your finger, it does not become lighter (blanch). It may feel warmer or cooler than the skin around it. The spot may feel hard or squishy under your fingers and may glance swollen. If you own sensation, it may be itchy or painful. At first, it may not glance love much, especially if the skin is not broken or open, but it can get a lot worse. If your skin becomes blistered, scabbed or has a little open area on the surface, this is more serious, as it indicates that the tissue underneath has begun to die. At this stage, the progression of skin break below is reversible: the skin will return to normal as soon as the cause of the irritation is found and eliminated and the skin is properly cared for.

If these steps are not taken, the damage can rapidly progress to a dangerous level where infection can attack the underlying tissue and bone, posing a serious risk to your health.

Is the damage being caused by pressure from lying on the area?

The areas most vulnerable when lying are the back of the head (in young children), ankles, knees, hips or shoulder blades. If so, avoid positioning on the affected area.

If you own difficulty with red areas despite frequent turning, there are various pressure relieving mattresses that can be prescribed by your health care provider to distribute pressure better than a regular mattress. Unfortunately, if you own never had any skin breakdown, it is hard to get insurance coverage for this type of specialty mattress. If you own had skin breakdown, coverage is often available.

Does the area of damage glance more love a scrape or a tear?

If the area looks more love a scrape or tear, it may be caused by friction or sheer from sliding below in bed or wheelchair or from dragging your bottom with transfers.

If you own had a change in your physical status, consider returning to physical therapy for a “tune up” focusing on increasing your strength, flexibility, and transfer technique. If you are dependent on others for part or every of your transfers, there is equipment that can be helpful to prevent sheer injury. This includes transfer boards, starting with simple slippery wood boards to a b-easy board with a sliding disk, a mechanical lifting device or overhead track lift systems.

Your physical therapist and occupational therapist can assist you identify equipment that will be most helpful for you and teach you and your care givers how to safely use this equipment.

What is the symptoms of skin allergy

A hospital bed that raises and lowers and has an elevating head and foot relax can be helpful, especially if you require assistance from others for bathing, positioning and transfers. The ability to lift and lower the bed will protect your caregiver’s back and often allows for level or “downhill” transfers, avoiding sheer injuries. Manual (hand crank) hospital beds or semi-electric hospital beds (hand crank to lift and lower the bed and electric to elevate the head and foot) are often covered by insurance with a excellent letter of medical necessity from your health care provider.

Enquire your health care provider to order a fully electric hospital bed, if you are unable to operate a hand crank independently. Your health care provider should indicate that you require assistance with transfers and bed mobility and require frequent repositioning to prevent costly skin breakdown. If you prefer not to own a hospital bed, you can permanently lift the height of your entire bed so that it is even with your wheelchair using blocks of wood, bricks or bed leg adjusters that can be purchased.

Is the redness or breakdown in the diaper (perineal) area?

Skin breakdown in the perineal area is generally caused by too much moisture often from sweating or irritation from urine and stool.

Skin problems in this area start out as redness and swelling (rash) and can progress to vesicles or pimples with oozing, crusting or scaling. Once the skin is open, there is increased risk for infection. Perineal skin care should be done as soon as possible after a bowel and/or bladder accident. Gently wash the area with soap that is indicated for the perineal area. Regular bar soap or antibacterial soap used for routine skin care can dry out this skin. The skin in this area will need moisturization with products such as glycerin, lanolin or mineral oil to replace natural moisture that is lost with frequent cleaning.

A skin barrier ointment or creams should be used to protect the skin from moisture or irritation.

If the redness or rash final longer than three days, has areas of multiple red bumps or pimples, or if you own oozing pimples that develop into a honey-colored crusted area, you should be seen by a heath professional as you may need treatment for a yeast infection or an antibiotic. Under-pads or absorbent briefs can be used as endless as they wick moisture away, rather than trapping the moisture against the skin.

Lastly, attempt to identify the cause of the skin irritation, especially if from frequent bowel or bladder accidents.


How can I hold my skin healthy?

Teach children to take responsibility for their own skin care

Parents of children at risk for skin breakdown need to be certain to check their children’s skin every day. This can become more hard as children enter their teen years, develop more modesty and are interested (or insistent) on being more independent in their own care. This may be an area that parents need to insist on participation as skin breakdown can progress from minor to serious literally overnight in a kid (or in an adult  for that matter).

If you own made daily skin inspection a part of your child’s routine since the onset of paralysis, this should be less of an issue. Be certain that they own the equipment, such as a mirror on a flexible wand, to examine their own skin with your oversight, if at every possible.

Use therapeutic surfaces 

Therapeutic surfaces, such as a pressure relieving wheelchair cushion or a pressure relieving mattress will reduce or relieve pressure, promote blood flow to tissues and enable proper positioning. Make certain that you use equipment the way it is recommended and that it fits correctly. When seated in a wheelchair, make certain the cushion is properly positioned and inflated and that you are sitting every the way back in the wheelchair.

Keep skin clean and dry

Bathe frequently using mild soap.

Avoid extremely boiling water as it dries skin. Dry your skin by patting rather than rubbing. Change undergarments or pads as soon as possible after a bowel or bladder accident.

Prevent mechanical Injury

Prevent mechanical injury to the skin from friction and shearing forces during repositioning and transfers. Lift, don’t slide. Lowering the head of the bed will assist minimize sheer and friction from sliding below in bed. Lift the entire bed up to the proper height to facilitate level surface transfers to and from a wheelchair. If necessary, use assistive devices, such as transfer boards or mechanical lifts to assist with transfers.

Your physical or occupational therapist can assist you with training and obtaining the correct equipment. Ensure that clothing fits comfortably and does not own pressure points, such as snaps, thick seams or pockets. Be certain that clothing is smoothed below under the bottom and back so you don’t get pressure points from bunched fabric. Hold bed sheets as wrinkle free as possible.

Take responsibility for you own skin care

The first line of defense in keeping your skin healthy is to take responsibility for your own skin care. If you are at risk for skin breakdown, you will need to develop a daily routine for monitoring and caring for your skin. You should do a finish inspection of your skin every day.

If you are unable to assess your own skin, you should be knowledgeable about the areas of your body where you are most vulnerable to skin breakdown and be certain that your care givers are checking these areas for you and reporting the status of your skin.

The most common areas for skin breakdown (pressure points) in adults are the sacrum/coccyx (tailbone), heels, elbows, lateral maleollus (outside of the ankle), greater trocater (hip bone) or the bottom of the femur (outside and inside of the knee) and the ischial tuberosities (the bones we sit on).

Pressure points for children are diverse and based on age and development (7). For infants and children less than three years of age, the head makes up a greater portion of the entire body weight and surface areas. When they are placed on their backs, the occipital region (back of the head) becomes the primary pressure point. When placed on their side, the ears are also extremely susceptible. For older children, the sacrum (lower spine) and calcaneous (the heel of the foot) are most at risk (9).

Develop a excellent home rehabilitation program

A regular daily therapy program will contribute to your overall health and well being, as well as reduce the risk of skin breakdown.

A excellent program should include therapy to increase muscle mass and strength, improve your flexibility, improve your cardiovascular endurance, and increase your circulation. An activity based program that includes components of weight bearing and/or gait training, functional electrical stimulation biking, as well as strengthening and stretching activities are beneficial to assist prevent skin breakdown. Use of the Wii gaming system in creative ways for “Wiihab” can assist with improving strength, balance and endurance. Aquatic therapy and horseback riding therapy are also beneficial, in addition to being fun.

Avoid prolonged pressure on any one spot

Reposition frequently.

When seated in a wheelchair, do weight shifts every 15 minutes. When lying in bed, reposition every 2 4 hours. Use pillows or wedges behind your back and between bony areas, such as knees and ankles. “Float” your heels and ankles off of the bed by supporting your lower leg with a pillow. Hold the head of the bed up less than 30 degrees to prevent shearing of skin from sliding below or the need to be pulled back up. If you use a wheelchair most of the day, avoid lying on your back at night.

Instead, turn side to side to give your backside a break. Better yet, sleep on your stomach, if this position is comfortable and you are capable to breathe safely. When positioned on your stomach, you own fewer pressure points, and can generally turn less frequently. Being on your stomach gives your backside a break, and allows you to stretch your hip flexor muscles and hamstring muscles, every for the price of one!

Eat a healthy diet

Eat a healthy diet and drink lots of fluids, especially water. Hold your body weight in a healthy range. People that are overweight or underweight tend to own more problems with skin breakdown. Excellent nutrition will assist make your skin more resistant to breakdown and you will be more likely to heal and fight off infection should it happen.

Eat the correct kinds of foods. This means a balanced diet with servings from every food groups. For healthy skin it is especially significant to get enough of the following nutrients in your diet:

  1. Vitamin A (Vegetables that are dark green or dark orange in color)
  2. Zinc (seafood, meat and eggs)
  3. Vitamin C (citrus fruits, strawberries, broccoli)
  4. Omega 3 fatty acids (salmon, mackerel, flaxseed)
  5. Protein (meat, eggs, cheese, and soy products)

Extra calories, especially from protein, are significant for repairing damaged tissues if you do own skin breakdown.

If you are concerned that you do not get enough of these foods in your diet, you can speak with a nutritionist or your health care provider about supplementation.

Keep muscle spasms under control 

Some muscle spasms can be beneficial as they assist you change position, if you can’t move yourself. Too much muscle spasticity can cause rubbing and friction, especially when you are in bed at night. Talk with your care provider about how to best manage spasticity. Exercise and range of motion are two excellent ways to reduce spasticity. Make certain orthotics (braces) are fitting properly, that they are worn correctly, and that the straps are fastened properly to prevent friction or pressure.

Be certain that your bladder and bowel programs are working well as increased spasticity can be caused by a urinary tract infection or constipation. Spasticity can also increase when you own a burn or skin breakdown.


Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November
Next review due: 22 November

Colonization with the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium was significantly and independently associated with food allergy in young children with eczema enrolled in a pivotal peanut allergy prevention study.

is a marker for severe eczema, and early eczema is a widely recognized risk factor for developing food allergies in young children.

But the findings from the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study cohort show that even after controlling for eczema severity, skin S.

aureus positivity was associated with an increased risk for developing allergies to peanuts, eggs, and cow’s milk.

S. aureus colonization was also associated with persistent egg allergy until at least age 5 or 6 years in the LEAP cohort analysis in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The lead researcher, Olympia Tsilochristou, MD, of Kings College London, said in a press statement that the findings could assist explain why young children with eczema own a extremely high risk for developing food allergies. While the exact mechanisms linking the two are not known, «our results propose that the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus could be an significant factor contributing to this outcome,» she said.

The findings also propose that S.

aureus colonization may inhibit peanut tolerance among at-risk infants when peanuts are introduced extremely early in life.

Among the nine participants in the peanut-consumption arm of the study (i.e., no peanut allergy at baseline) who had confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, every but one were colonized with S. aureus at one or more LEAP study visits.

«The fact that S. aureus was associated with greater risk of peanut allergy among peanut consumers but not peanut avoiders further suggests that peanut consumption was less effective in the prevention of peanut allergy among participants with S.

What is the symptoms of skin allergy

aureus compared with those with no S. aureus,» the researchers wrote.

The LEAP study enrolled infants ages months with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both. The babies were randomized to therapeutic peanut consumption or peanut avoidance, and every had eczema clinical evaluation and culture of skin and nasal swabs at baseline.

The follow-up LEAP-On study assessed the children at age 72 months, after 12 months of peanut avoidance in both groups.

Skin and nasal swabs were obtained at baseline and at age 12, 30, and 60 months.

A entire of % of the participants had some form of S. aureus colonization (% skin and % nasal) on at least one LEAP study visit, with most having just one positive test result. The greatest rates of colonization were recorded at months of age.

S. aureus colonization was significantly associated with eczema severity, along with hen’s egg white and peanut specific immunoglobulin (sIg)E production at any LEAP visit. But even after controlling for eczema severity, hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE levels at each LEAP and LEAP-On visit were significantly associated with skin S.

aureus positivity, the team noted.

«This relationship was even stronger when we looked into high-level hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE production,» the researchers wrote. «Similar findings were noted for cow’s milk, where high-level sIgE production to milk at 30, 60, and 72 months of age was related to any skin S. aureus colonization. Together, these data propose that S. aureus is associated with hen’s egg, peanut, and cow’s milk allergy.»

In the LEAP study, extremely early peanut consumption was found to reduce the risk of peanut allergy at 60 months in infants at high risk for developing the allergy, but infants in the consumption arm of the study with S.

aureus colonization were approximately seven and four times more likely to own confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, the team said.

Study strengths, Tsilochristou and co-authors noted, included the rigorous design; a limitation was the reliance on bacteriological culture to identify S. aureus colonization rather than using DNA-based testing.

«S. aureus has been implicated in the development and severity of atopic diseases, namely eczema, allergic rhinitis, and asthma; our findings extend these observations to the development of food allergy independent of eczema severity,» the investigators concluded.

«The role of S.

What is the symptoms of skin allergy

aureus as a potential environmental factor should be considered in future interventions aimed at inducing and maintaining tolerance to food allergens in eczematous infants. Further prospective longitudinal studies measuring S. aureus with more advanced techniques and interventional studies eradicating S. aureus in early infancy will assist elucidate its role in the development of eczema or food allergy,» the team wrote.

Sarcoptic Mange: Save Your Dog’s Skin from Scabies

It sounds troubling, love something out of a gritty movie about the bad part of town: a dog walks by with mange, looking ragged, uncared-for and mad.

Well, you’d be mad and ragged too if tiny mites caused you to lose your hair and itch severely. Thankfully, mange is not as scary as you may own heard, and it’s easily treatable.

What is mange on dogs?

The illness we call “mange” on dogs is actually sarcoptic mange, also known as canine scabies. It’s not an illness but rather an infestation of microscopic mites – the parasite known as Sarcoptes scaeibi.

While cats, foxes and even humans can get mange, these parasites particularly prefer dogs. Once on a host dog, the mites cause several skin problems, most notably hair loss and severe itching.

What are the symptoms of sarcoptic mange?

The most obvious symptoms of sarcoptic mange is severe itching and hair loss. The mites prefer to live in areas with less hair, so itching is often concentrated on the dog’s elbows, ears, chest, armpits and stomach.

As the infestation worsens, the itching and hair loss spreads.

What is the symptoms of skin allergy

The bites can also cause red pustules with yellow crusts.

If left untreated, the dog’s skin will start showing signs of severe irritation, such as redness and sores due to bacterial infections. In fact, some doctors believe the irritation dogs feel is actually an allergic reaction to the mites’ bites.

How is sarcoptic mange diagnosed on dogs?

It can be challenging for you or your veterinarian to diagnose sarcoptic mange. When mange is suspected, your vet will scrape the dog’s skin to glance for the scabies under a microscope.

Unfortunately, the mites only show up in about 20 percent of skin scrapings – so while a positive identification surely means the mites are present, a negative scraping does not really prove anything. Therefore, the most common way to diagnose a dog for mange is to discuss the dog’s history, note if allergy treatments own been effective or failed, and to start treatment for scabies. If the dog improves with treatment, then a diagnosis of scabies may be confirmed.

How do you treat canine scabies?

There are a few approaches to treating sarcoptic mange in dogs.

  • Heartworm and flea prevention: Some vets will prescribe flea-prevention and heartworm-prevention medications love Revolution or Frontline to treat mange, but at the Animal Clinic of Woodruff, we own not seen these treatments to be effective in treating scabies.

    However, one medicine we’ve had success with at the Clinic is Bravecto. It’s a flea and tick prevention that is also effective at killing the scabies mite. We typically combine this medication with our bath protocol, but in mild cases, it may be used alone.

  • Medicinal baths: Our preferred and the most effective treatment is to bath the dog regularly in chemical shampoos. The dog will generally own his hair clipped short, then is dipped once/week for weeks.

    Unfortunately, the dip has a extremely foul smell and can be toxic to humans and vulnerable dogs, so grand care is needed in dipping dogs (and in treating their facial areas). When done correctly, the dips are extremely effectively.

  • Liquid ivermectin: This is a stronger version of the heartworm prevention medicine found in Heartguard. We will occasionally use this treatment, but it’s rarely a first choice. It should not be used for Collies, Shetland sheep dogs, or other herding breeds.

Along with treating the dog, the dog’s bedding and other areas can be treated with an insecticide.

And since scabies is spread among dogs, other dogs in the home should be treated.

Finally, due to the trauma on the dog’s skin, your vet will likely also need to prescribe medications to treat bacterial skin infections and/or yeast infections, and will also propose products to relieve itchy, sore skin.

Can humans get mange?

There are human versions of scabies, but that is a diverse animal than Sarcoptes scaeibi, which lives on dogs.

That said, humans can contract scabies from pets, and might experience itching or rashes, especially on the wrists or hands. If you see a rash or are itchy while your dog has scabies, see your doctor immediately.

How can I prevent mange and scabies in dogs?

There’s no way to fully protect your dog, as scabies is spread by contact with other dogs. Take care when your dog is surrounded by lots of other dogs. You should hold your dog away from foxes and places where foxes go, as they can carry scabies that will carry to dogs.

If you suspect your dog may own mange, contact Animal Clinic of Woodruff today to make an appointment with our veterinarians in Woodruff.

Posted in Pet Health Issues

Resources We Love

Favorite Organizations for Essential Psoriasis Information

American Academy of Dermatology (AAD)

The AAD represents the vast majority of practicing dermatologists in the United States.

Its website includes a tool that allows you to search its database to discover dermatologists in your area.

American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

This global organization of physicians, health professionals, and scientists has provided a comprehensive website that offers a wealth of patient and caregiver resources, including educational videos, information on available medication and therapies, and a search tool to discover a local rheumatologist.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

Dedicated to supporting research to treat diseases affecting muscles, bones, joints, and skin, NIAMS offers a website that provides an exhaustive guide to skin conditions and related topics, as well as news on the most recent clinical trials.

National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF)

As the leading patient advocacy group for people living with psoriatic disease, the NPF provides an huge online support community for people dealing with psoriasis.

It provides a wealth of patient resources, including personalized guidance on how to deal with the disease.

Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Alliance (PAPAA)

Founded in , this alliance of two previous psoriasis-based foundations operates a website offering information, advice, and support for those living with psoriasis, including a special section for children coping with the disease.

Psoriasis Cure Now

This patient advocacy group specializes in raising awareness about the seriousness of psoriasis and the need for additional medical research.

It also provides resources and information to urge patients to advocate for themselves when seeking medical care.

Favorite Retreats

Soap Lake Natural Resort and Spa

Soap Lake in Washington state has endless been a favorite destination for those dealing with skin conditions, thanks to the lake’s high natural mineral count and alkaline levels. In addition to specialized treatments, the Soap Lake Natural Resort and Spa also provides healthy dining options and a number of outdoor activities. Its accommodations also include in-room Jacuzzis that use water pumped from the lake, allowing you to experience the lake’s waters from the privacy of your room at any time during the year.

Blue Lagoon

Set in a volcanic Icelandic landscape, the Blue Lagoon resort provides luxury accommodations and fine dining, finish with a private lagoon at the Silica Hotel.

Its best feature, however, may be the clinic, which is widely favorite in treating psoriasis. Guests can bathe in the mineral-rich seawater of the lagoon, while other treatments include UV light therapy and a host of internally developed skin-care products.

Favorite Sites for Financial Assistance and Advocacy

National Psoriasis Foundation — Advocacy

NPF Advocacy helps organize volunteers to share information and advocate with legislators for change in public policy regarding psoriasis.

NeedyMeds

This online nonprofit information resource helps users to discover programs that assist patients who can’t afford medication and healthcare costs.

Partnership for Prescription Assistance (PPA)

The free PPA website helps users locate public and private assistance programs that can assist cover expensive prescription medication costs.

Favorite Blogs

The Itch to Beat Psoriasis

Everyday Health contributor Howard Chang provides a firsthand perspective on psoriasis with an additional dose of encouragement, education, and empathy.

Chang’s posts deal with the everyday details of living with psoriasis, including topics such as navigating the condition as a parent and how best to use the frequent time you spend in doctors’ waiting rooms.

Just a Girl With Spots

Having been diagnosed with psoriasis at 15, blogger Joni Kazantzis writes about not only her personal battles with the condition but also the mental and physical challenges that each person with psoriasis must battle daily.

Overcoming Psoriasis

Todd Bello was diagnosed with psoriasis at age Through his blog, Bello shares regular posts about living with psoriasis as well as his patient advocacy efforts as a extremely athletic volunteer for the NPF.

His passionate efforts on behalf of others with psoriasis own helped build a community of support for those dealing with the condition.

The National Psoriasis Foundation blog

With the motto “the P is silent but we are not!” this blog is a frequently updated resource that covers a wide spectrum of psoriasis-related topics, including health, advocacy, and inspirational personal stories.

Favorite Apps

Flaym

Created by the LEO Innovation Lab, this user-friendly app is a social media platform for people living with psoriasis.

In addition to providing an easier way to join with others dealing with the condition, it provides groups based on topic (parenting, diet, exercise, travel) and offers tools to assist host meetups.

Imagine

This app allows you to document and track how your psoriasis develops over time by using your phone’s camera. The split-screen feature enables you to compare your condition over time and relate it to the effectiveness of your treatment with your dermatologist.

Skin is the largest organ covering the entire exterior of the body. It receives one third of the body’s blood circulation.

Your skin is tough and pliable, forming the body’s protective shield against heat, light, chemical and physical action. It plays an athletic role with the immune system, protecting us from infection. Your skin maintains a stable internal environment and is significant in maintaining a proper temperature for the body to function well.

What is the symptoms of skin allergy

In addition to providing protection and internal regulation, your skin gathers sensory information from the environment, allowing you to feel painful and pleasant stimulation. Your skin also stores water, fat, and vitamin D.

The skin consists of three layers:  Epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue. The outermost layer, the epidermis, is composed mostly of dead skin cells that are constantly being shed and replaced. The dermis or second layer has sweat glands, oil glands, nerve endings, and little blood vessels called capillaries, which are every woven together by a protein called collagen.

Collagen provides nourishment and support for skin cells. The nerves ending in this layer transmit sensations of pain, itch, touch and pleasure. The hair follicles also originate in this layer. Destruction of either the epidermis or dermis can leave the body open and susceptible to infection. The subcutaneous adipose tissue is the deepest layer of skin and is a layer of fat and collagen that houses larger blood vessels and nerves. This layer is significant in controlling the temperature of the skin itself and the body and protects the body from injury by acting as a shock absorber. The thickness of this layer varies throughout the body and from person to person. Underneath the subcutaneous tissue lays muscle and bone.

For the most part, the skin is tough, pliable and resistant to injury.

If the skin becomes injured or broken, it is generally extremely resilient and has an amazing ability to self-repair and heal. Despite this resiliency, the skin is susceptible to breakdown, if subjected to prolonged abuses, such as excessive pressure, shear force, friction or moisture. This is a major concern for persons with transverse myelitis or other neuroimmunologic conditions that cause paralysis and/or decreased sensation.

For people with paralysis, the skin is at increased risk for breakdown for several reasons. Paralysis itself affects the skin and underlying tissue.

There is loss of collagen which weakens the skin and makes it less elastic. The lack of muscle function around boney areas of the body leads to muscle atrophy, resulting in less padding, which in turn, adds to the risk of skin breakdown. People with paralysis often own difficulty shifting their weight, repositioning themselves, or transferring without assistance.

Impaired sensation is often present, limiting the ability to sense when to make a weight shift or position adjustment. People with impaired sensation are also vulnerable to injury from numerous other hazards, such as, heat, freezing, sun and trauma.

Loss of sensation put an individual at risk for burns from extremely ordinary activities, such as using a lap top computer sitting directly on your lap or sitting too shut to a fireplace. Injury can be caused from things that are too freezing such as, ice packs or freezing exposure causing frostbite. Ingrown toenails can become infected and sunburn can become severe without feeling it.

When limited mobility is coupled with decreased sensation, a person is more likely to develop a specific type of skin breakdown called a pressure ulcer. According to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, a pressure ulcer is defined as a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue generally over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear and/or friction (1).

Pressure ulcers are one of the leading causes of complication across the life span of persons with paralysis (2). Up to 95 % of adults with spinal cord injury will develop at least one serious pressure ulcer at some time during their life (3).

Skin breakdown can range from minor scrapes, cuts, tears, blisters or burns to the most serious pressure ulcers with the destruction of tissue below to and even including the bone. A pressure ulcer, especially one that requires surgery, such as a muscle flap or skin graft, can cost thousands of dollars to treat, require lengthy hospitalization, and weeks to months away from family, work, school or community activities.

It has been estimated that for persons with spinal cord injury the cost of care for pressure ulcers is about $ to billion dollars annually (4).

With a concerted effort, skin breakdown is, for the most part, preventable. It can happen, however, even in people who maintain the most diligent care and use the proper equipment. If skin breakdown is identified early, when still in the minor stages, and if the cause of the breakdown can be identified and eliminated, healing should happen fairly quickly. If it is not identified in its early stages, skin breakdown can rapidly progress from minor to serious.

Skin breakdown is caused in several diverse ways, including friction, shear, moisture and pressure.

These causes can happen individually or in combination. Friction, moisture and sheer are identified as contributing factors to pressure ulcers (5). A friction injury occurs when the skin rubs on surfaces, such as a bed sheet, arm relax or brace and has the appearance of a scrape, abrasion or blister. This type of injury is typically seen on the heels and elbows and may result from repositioning, propping or rubbing due to increased spasticity.

A shearing injury occurs with dragging or sliding of a body part across a surface and has the appearance of a cut or tear.

This type of injury can happen from dragging your bottom during a transfer or sliding below in bed when the head of the bed is elevated. With the sliding force, bone is moved against the subcutaneous tissue while the epidermis and dermis remains essentially in the same position; against the supporting surface such as a wheelchair or bed. This action causes occlusion of the blood vessels, decreasing blood flow, oxygen and nourishment to the skin, which eventually leads to breakdown.

Sometimes a shear injury will actually tear the tissue over the tailbone and with unrelieved pressure will become a pressure ulcer.

Too much moisture over-hydrates the skin, making it feeble and more sensitive to friction, shear and breakdown (think about being in the tub or pool for a endless time). Primary sources of excess skin moisture include sweating, bowel and bladder accidents, and drainage from wounds.

Pressure ulcers happen when skin, soft tissue and blood vessels are compressed or squeezed between a bony prominence (such as your tailbone) and an external surface (such as your wheelchair cushion).

With compression of these vessels, the blood that nourishes the cells and takes away waste is cut off, starving the tissue of oxygen and vital nutrients. Without food and oxygen, tissue dies and skin breakdown begins. The body tries to compensate by sending more blood to the area. This process results in redness and swelling, places even more pressure on the blood vessels, and further endangers the health of the skin and underlying tissue. Ultimately, a pressure ulcer forms.

Increased pressure over short periods of time and slight pressure over endless periods of time own been shown to cause equal amounts of damage.

Many factors own been identified as responsible for the development of skin breakdown and pressure ulcer formation. In addition to immobility, impaired sensation and the external factors described above, numerous internal contributing factors own been identified. These internal factors include poor nutrition and hydration, weight, impaired circulation and oxygenation, impaired cognition or thinking, substance abuse, depression and age (6, 7). Nutritional factors significant to prevent or heal wounds include a balanced diet with an adequate intake of protein, vitamin C, vitamin A, and zinc, as well as an adequate intake of fluids (8).

When a person is overweight, additional pounds put additional pressure on vulnerable skin areas increasing the risk of compression of blood vessels. Individuals that are underweight often own decreased muscle mass with less fat padding over boney areas leaving them vulnerable to skin breakdown. Smoking, diabetes, anemia and other vascular conditions every lead to decreased circulation, increasing risk for skin breakdown.

Individuals who are depressed or own impaired thinking and judgment due to substance abuse are less likely to be vigilant with regard to significant self-care issues, such as skin health. Young children generally own more resilient and elastic skin and more baby fat and padding so they often own extremely little difficulty with skin break below. As children move into adolescence, their skin loses some of its elasticity. They generally own more body weight, putting more stress on pressure areas, such as the ischeal tuberosicties and tailbone with sitting.

Teens often start to own more difficulty with skin breakdown. As we continue to age, our skin becomes increasingly less pliable and resilient. We experience the loss of collagen and muscle mass, as well as decreased circulation, making the skin more vulnerable. The elderly are most prone to skin tears and stripping due to fragile, thin, and vulnerable skin. In addition, incontinence may become a more frequent issue for bedridden or ill persons, increasing problems with moisture as described above.

Along with treating the dog, the dog’s bedding and other areas can be treated with an insecticide. And since scabies is spread among dogs, other dogs in the home should be treated.

Finally, due to the trauma on the dog’s skin, your vet will likely also need to prescribe medications to treat bacterial skin infections and/or yeast infections, and will also propose products to relieve itchy, sore skin.

Can humans get mange?

There are human versions of scabies, but that is a diverse animal than Sarcoptes scaeibi, which lives on dogs.

That said, humans can contract scabies from pets, and might experience itching or rashes, especially on the wrists or hands. If you see a rash or are itchy while your dog has scabies, see your doctor immediately.

How can I prevent mange and scabies in dogs?

There’s no way to fully protect your dog, as scabies is spread by contact with other dogs. Take care when your dog is surrounded by lots of other dogs. You should hold your dog away from foxes and places where foxes go, as they can carry scabies that will carry to dogs.

If you suspect your dog may own mange, contact Animal Clinic of Woodruff today to make an appointment with our veterinarians in Woodruff.

Posted in Pet Health Issues

Resources We Love

Favorite Organizations for Essential Psoriasis Information

American Academy of Dermatology (AAD)

The AAD represents the vast majority of practicing dermatologists in the United States.

Its website includes a tool that allows you to search its database to discover dermatologists in your area.

American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

This global organization of physicians, health professionals, and scientists has provided a comprehensive website that offers a wealth of patient and caregiver resources, including educational videos, information on available medication and therapies, and a search tool to discover a local rheumatologist.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

Dedicated to supporting research to treat diseases affecting muscles, bones, joints, and skin, NIAMS offers a website that provides an exhaustive guide to skin conditions and related topics, as well as news on the most recent clinical trials.

National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF)

As the leading patient advocacy group for people living with psoriatic disease, the NPF provides an huge online support community for people dealing with psoriasis.

It provides a wealth of patient resources, including personalized guidance on how to deal with the disease.

Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Alliance (PAPAA)

Founded in , this alliance of two previous psoriasis-based foundations operates a website offering information, advice, and support for those living with psoriasis, including a special section for children coping with the disease.

Psoriasis Cure Now

This patient advocacy group specializes in raising awareness about the seriousness of psoriasis and the need for additional medical research. It also provides resources and information to urge patients to advocate for themselves when seeking medical care.

Favorite Retreats

Soap Lake Natural Resort and Spa

Soap Lake in Washington state has endless been a favorite destination for those dealing with skin conditions, thanks to the lake’s high natural mineral count and alkaline levels.

In addition to specialized treatments, the Soap Lake Natural Resort and Spa also provides healthy dining options and a number of outdoor activities. Its accommodations also include in-room Jacuzzis that use water pumped from the lake, allowing you to experience the lake’s waters from the privacy of your room at any time during the year.

Blue Lagoon

Set in a volcanic Icelandic landscape, the Blue Lagoon resort provides luxury accommodations and fine dining, finish with a private lagoon at the Silica Hotel. Its best feature, however, may be the clinic, which is widely favorite in treating psoriasis.

Guests can bathe in the mineral-rich seawater of the lagoon, while other treatments include UV light therapy and a host of internally developed skin-care products.

Favorite Sites for Financial Assistance and Advocacy

National Psoriasis Foundation — Advocacy

NPF Advocacy helps organize volunteers to share information and advocate with legislators for change in public policy regarding psoriasis.

NeedyMeds

This online nonprofit information resource helps users to discover programs that assist patients who can’t afford medication and healthcare costs.

Partnership for Prescription Assistance (PPA)

The free PPA website helps users locate public and private assistance programs that can assist cover expensive prescription medication costs.

Favorite Blogs

The Itch to Beat Psoriasis

Everyday Health contributor Howard Chang provides a firsthand perspective on psoriasis with an additional dose of encouragement, education, and empathy.

Chang’s posts deal with the everyday details of living with psoriasis, including topics such as navigating the condition as a parent and how best to use the frequent time you spend in doctors’ waiting rooms.

Just a Girl With Spots

Having been diagnosed with psoriasis at 15, blogger Joni Kazantzis writes about not only her personal battles with the condition but also the mental and physical challenges that each person with psoriasis must battle daily.

Overcoming Psoriasis

Todd Bello was diagnosed with psoriasis at age Through his blog, Bello shares regular posts about living with psoriasis as well as his patient advocacy efforts as a extremely athletic volunteer for the NPF.

His passionate efforts on behalf of others with psoriasis own helped build a community of support for those dealing with the condition.

The National Psoriasis Foundation blog

With the motto “the P is silent but we are not!” this blog is a frequently updated resource that covers a wide spectrum of psoriasis-related topics, including health, advocacy, and inspirational personal stories.

Favorite Apps

Flaym

Created by the LEO Innovation Lab, this user-friendly app is a social media platform for people living with psoriasis. In addition to providing an easier way to join with others dealing with the condition, it provides groups based on topic (parenting, diet, exercise, travel) and offers tools to assist host meetups.

Imagine

This app allows you to document and track how your psoriasis develops over time by using your phone’s camera.

The split-screen feature enables you to compare your condition over time and relate it to the effectiveness of your treatment with your dermatologist.

Skin is the largest organ covering the entire exterior of the body. It receives one third of the body’s blood circulation.

What is the symptoms of skin allergy

Your skin is tough and pliable, forming the body’s protective shield against heat, light, chemical and physical action. It plays an athletic role with the immune system, protecting us from infection. Your skin maintains a stable internal environment and is significant in maintaining a proper temperature for the body to function well. In addition to providing protection and internal regulation, your skin gathers sensory information from the environment, allowing you to feel painful and pleasant stimulation. Your skin also stores water, fat, and vitamin D.

The skin consists of three layers:  Epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue.

The outermost layer, the epidermis, is composed mostly of dead skin cells that are constantly being shed and replaced. The dermis or second layer has sweat glands, oil glands, nerve endings, and little blood vessels called capillaries, which are every woven together by a protein called collagen. Collagen provides nourishment and support for skin cells. The nerves ending in this layer transmit sensations of pain, itch, touch and pleasure. The hair follicles also originate in this layer. Destruction of either the epidermis or dermis can leave the body open and susceptible to infection.

The subcutaneous adipose tissue is the deepest layer of skin and is a layer of fat and collagen that houses larger blood vessels and nerves. This layer is significant in controlling the temperature of the skin itself and the body and protects the body from injury by acting as a shock absorber. The thickness of this layer varies throughout the body and from person to person. Underneath the subcutaneous tissue lays muscle and bone.

For the most part, the skin is tough, pliable and resistant to injury.

If the skin becomes injured or broken, it is generally extremely resilient and has an amazing ability to self-repair and heal. Despite this resiliency, the skin is susceptible to breakdown, if subjected to prolonged abuses, such as excessive pressure, shear force, friction or moisture. This is a major concern for persons with transverse myelitis or other neuroimmunologic conditions that cause paralysis and/or decreased sensation.

For people with paralysis, the skin is at increased risk for breakdown for several reasons. Paralysis itself affects the skin and underlying tissue.

There is loss of collagen which weakens the skin and makes it less elastic. The lack of muscle function around boney areas of the body leads to muscle atrophy, resulting in less padding, which in turn, adds to the risk of skin breakdown. People with paralysis often own difficulty shifting their weight, repositioning themselves, or transferring without assistance.

Impaired sensation is often present, limiting the ability to sense when to make a weight shift or position adjustment.

People with impaired sensation are also vulnerable to injury from numerous other hazards, such as, heat, freezing, sun and trauma. Loss of sensation put an individual at risk for burns from extremely ordinary activities, such as using a lap top computer sitting directly on your lap or sitting too shut to a fireplace. Injury can be caused from things that are too freezing such as, ice packs or freezing exposure causing frostbite. Ingrown toenails can become infected and sunburn can become severe without feeling it.

When limited mobility is coupled with decreased sensation, a person is more likely to develop a specific type of skin breakdown called a pressure ulcer.

According to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, a pressure ulcer is defined as a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue generally over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear and/or friction (1). Pressure ulcers are one of the leading causes of complication across the life span of persons with paralysis (2). Up to 95 % of adults with spinal cord injury will develop at least one serious pressure ulcer at some time during their life (3).

Skin breakdown can range from minor scrapes, cuts, tears, blisters or burns to the most serious pressure ulcers with the destruction of tissue below to and even including the bone.

A pressure ulcer, especially one that requires surgery, such as a muscle flap or skin graft, can cost thousands of dollars to treat, require lengthy hospitalization, and weeks to months away from family, work, school or community activities. It has been estimated that for persons with spinal cord injury the cost of care for pressure ulcers is about $ to billion dollars annually (4).

With a concerted effort, skin breakdown is, for the most part, preventable.

It can happen, however, even in people who maintain the most diligent care and use the proper equipment. If skin breakdown is identified early, when still in the minor stages, and if the cause of the breakdown can be identified and eliminated, healing should happen fairly quickly. If it is not identified in its early stages, skin breakdown can rapidly progress from minor to serious.

Skin breakdown is caused in several diverse ways, including friction, shear, moisture and pressure. These causes can happen individually or in combination. Friction, moisture and sheer are identified as contributing factors to pressure ulcers (5).

A friction injury occurs when the skin rubs on surfaces, such as a bed sheet, arm relax or brace and has the appearance of a scrape, abrasion or blister. This type of injury is typically seen on the heels and elbows and may result from repositioning, propping or rubbing due to increased spasticity.

A shearing injury occurs with dragging or sliding of a body part across a surface and has the appearance of a cut or tear. This type of injury can happen from dragging your bottom during a transfer or sliding below in bed when the head of the bed is elevated. With the sliding force, bone is moved against the subcutaneous tissue while the epidermis and dermis remains essentially in the same position; against the supporting surface such as a wheelchair or bed.

This action causes occlusion of the blood vessels, decreasing blood flow, oxygen and nourishment to the skin, which eventually leads to breakdown. Sometimes a shear injury will actually tear the tissue over the tailbone and with unrelieved pressure will become a pressure ulcer.

Too much moisture over-hydrates the skin, making it feeble and more sensitive to friction, shear and breakdown (think about being in the tub or pool for a endless time). Primary sources of excess skin moisture include sweating, bowel and bladder accidents, and drainage from wounds.

Pressure ulcers happen when skin, soft tissue and blood vessels are compressed or squeezed between a bony prominence (such as your tailbone) and an external surface (such as your wheelchair cushion).

With compression of these vessels, the blood that nourishes the cells and takes away waste is cut off, starving the tissue of oxygen and vital nutrients. Without food and oxygen, tissue dies and skin breakdown begins. The body tries to compensate by sending more blood to the area. This process results in redness and swelling, places even more pressure on the blood vessels, and further endangers the health of the skin and underlying tissue. Ultimately, a pressure ulcer forms. Increased pressure over short periods of time and slight pressure over endless periods of time own been shown to cause equal amounts of damage.

Many factors own been identified as responsible for the development of skin breakdown and pressure ulcer formation.

In addition to immobility, impaired sensation and the external factors described above, numerous internal contributing factors own been identified. These internal factors include poor nutrition and hydration, weight, impaired circulation and oxygenation, impaired cognition or thinking, substance abuse, depression and age (6, 7). Nutritional factors significant to prevent or heal wounds include a balanced diet with an adequate intake of protein, vitamin C, vitamin A, and zinc, as well as an adequate intake of fluids (8). When a person is overweight, additional pounds put additional pressure on vulnerable skin areas increasing the risk of compression of blood vessels.

Individuals that are underweight often own decreased muscle mass with less fat padding over boney areas leaving them vulnerable to skin breakdown. Smoking, diabetes, anemia and other vascular conditions every lead to decreased circulation, increasing risk for skin breakdown. Individuals who are depressed or own impaired thinking and judgment due to substance abuse are less likely to be vigilant with regard to significant self-care issues, such as skin health. Young children generally own more resilient and elastic skin and more baby fat and padding so they often own extremely little difficulty with skin break below.

As children move into adolescence, their skin loses some of its elasticity. They generally own more body weight, putting more stress on pressure areas, such as the ischeal tuberosicties and tailbone with sitting. Teens often start to own more difficulty with skin breakdown. As we continue to age, our skin becomes increasingly less pliable and resilient. We experience the loss of collagen and muscle mass, as well as decreased circulation, making the skin more vulnerable. The elderly are most prone to skin tears and stripping due to fragile, thin, and vulnerable skin.

In addition, incontinence may become a more frequent issue for bedridden or ill persons, increasing problems with moisture as described above.


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