What is the best nasal spray for allergies

Immunotherapy should be istered in a setting that permits the immediate recognition and management of adverse reactions. The preferred location for such istration is the prescribing physician’s office. However, patients can get immunotherapy injections at another health care facility if the physician and staff at that location are trained and equipped to recognize and manage immunotherapy reactions, particularly anaphylaxis. Allergen Immunotherapy: A Practice Parameter 3rd update- Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, AAAAI and ACAAI

Allergy shots are the most effective therapy for treating nasal allergies and their attendant complications.

My patients often call them life changing. Despite their effectiveness, numerous patients who would benefit from them select not to utilize this therapy. The most common reason they select  not to do so is not money, since insurance coverage is generally extremely excellent, or fear of needles, since the injections are relatively painless. The biggest reason is time. Allergy shots must be istered in a medically supervised setting where the provider and staff are familiar with the shot process and own the means to diagnose and manage acute allergic reactions.

What is the best nasal spray for allergies

This means coming to the doctors office to get injections. Given the busy modern lifestyle, this can be a significant time commitment. So why does it own to be this way? The answer is safety.

Allergy shots are generally a safe procedure, but, love every medical procedures, there is risk involved. Overall, systemic allergic reactions happen in about 1 out of every injections. From , about 5% of patients experienced a systemic reaction. From , this rate fell to about 1% of patients. The tremendous drop in reaction rates is attributable in part to better standardization of allergen extracts and to the widespread implementation of computerized immunotherapy monitoring systems, which drastically reduced dosing errors.

Indeed, the most recent data suggests that only 25% of systemic reactions are due to dosing errors, while almost half are due to receiving injections during a severe allergy flare. Fortunately, most reactions to allergy shots are mild to moderate, but severe reactions, even fatalities, do happen. Fatality rates own remained fairly constant at million injections, about the same risk as being in a commercial airline accident, million flights.

Those numbers should be reassuring to patients but also might lead some to conclude that allergy shots are indeed safe enough for home istration. Theyre not, and heres why: Allergy shots are as safe as they are because the vast majority are given in a medically supervised setting.  All of the above data looking at safety come from patients who received shots at the office of their allergist or another physician.

We dont know what the reaction rates or safety outcomes would own been if the same patient population had been allowed to get injections at home, but I cant imagine that they would be better.

Allergen immunotherapy is a complicated process that requires careful monitoring of doses, frequent dose adjustment, and clinical training to assess if patients are well enough to get their shots. Allergists own years of training and experience in this regard as well as in the diagnosis and management of acute allergic reactions.

We own dedicated staff whose sole occupation is to ister injections and computer managed protocols designed to reduce error.

What is the best nasal spray for allergies

Every of this helps the allergist deliver the most effective therapies with the highest degree of safety. You should accept no less.

Dr. O

Categories: aaaai, acaai, allergic reactions, allergy shots, Anaphylaxis, at home shots, build immunity, Current Topics, immunotherapy | Tags: allergy shots, allergy shots at home, immunotherapy, risk of allergy shots at home, safety of allergy shots at home | Permalink

Medications

Many allergens that trigger allergic rhinitis are airborne, so you can’t always avoid them.

If your symptoms can’t be well-controlled by simply avoiding triggers, your allergist may recommend medications that reduce nasal congestion, sneezing, and an itchy and runny nose. They are available in numerous forms — oral tablets, liquid medication, nasal sprays and eyedrops. Some medications may own side effects, so discuss these treatments with your allergist so they can assist you live the life you want.

Nasal sprays

Nonprescription saline nasal sprays will assist counteract symptoms such as dry nasal passages or thick nasal mucus.

Unlike decongestant nasal sprays, a saline nasal spray can be used as often as it is needed. Sometimes an allergist may recommend washing (douching) the nasal passage. There are numerous OTC delivery systems for saline rinses, including neti pots and saline rinse bottles.

Nasal cromolyn blocks the body’s release of allergy-causing substances. It does not work in every patients. The full dose is four times daily, and improvement of symptoms may take several weeks. Nasal cromolyn can assist prevent allergic nasal reactions if taken prior to an allergen exposure.

Nasal ipratropium bromide spray can assist reduce nasal drainage from allergic rhinitis or some forms of nonallergic rhinitis.

Decongestants

Decongestants assist relieve the stuffiness and pressure caused by swollen nasal tissue.

They do not contain antihistamines, so they do not cause antihistaminic side effects. They do not relieve other symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Oral decongestants are available as prescription and nonprescription medications and are often found in combination with antihistamines or other medications. It is not unusual for patients using decongestants to experience insomnia if they take the medication in the afternoon or evening. If this occurs, a dose reduction may be needed. At times, men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on decongestants.

Patients using medications to manage emotional or behavioral problems should discuss this with their allergist before using decongestants. Patients with high blood pressure or heart disease should check with their allergist before using. Pregnant patients should also check with their allergist before starting decongestants.

Nonprescription decongestant nasal sprays work within minutes and final for hours, but you should not use them for more than a few days at a time unless instructed by your allergist. Prolonged use can cause rhinitis medicamentosa, or rebound swelling of the nasal tissue.

Stopping the use of the decongestant nasal spray will cure that swelling, provided that there is no underlying disorder.

Oral decongestants are found in numerous over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications, and may be the treatment of choice for nasal congestion. They don’t cause rhinitis medicamentosa but need to be avoided by some patients with high blood pressure. If you own high blood pressure or heart problems, check with your allergist before using them.

Leukatriene pathway inhibitors

Leukotriene pathway inhibitors (montelukast, zafirlukast and zileuton) block the action of leukotriene, a substance in the body that can cause symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

These drugs are also used to treat asthma.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic rhinitis. These medications counter the effects of histamine, the irritating chemical released within your body when an allergic reaction takes put. Although other chemicals are involved, histamine is primarily responsible for causing the symptoms. Antihistamines are found in eyedrops, nasal sprays and, most commonly, oral tablets and syrup.

Antihistamines assist to relieve nasal allergy symptoms such as:

  1. Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  2. Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  3. Itchy skin, hives and eczema

There are dozens of antihistamines; some are available over the counter, while others require a prescription.

Patients reply to them in a wide variety of ways.

Generally, the newer (second-generation) products work well and produce only minor side effects. Some people discover that an antihistamine becomes less effective as the allergy season worsens or as their allergies change over time. If you discover that an antihistamine is becoming less effective, tell your allergist, who may recommend a diverse type or strength of antihistamine. If you own excessive nasal dryness or thick nasal mucus, consult an allergist before taking antihistamines.

Contact your allergist for advice if an antihistamine causes drowsiness or other side effects.

Proper use: Short-acting antihistamines can be taken every four to six hours, while timed-release antihistamines are taken every 12 to 24 hours. The short-acting antihistamines are often most helpful if taken 30 minutes before an anticipated exposure to an allergen (such as at a picnic during ragweed season). Timed-release antihistamines are better suited to long-term use for those who need daily medications. Proper use of these drugs is just as significant as their selection. The most effective way to use them is before symptoms develop.

A dose taken early can eliminate the need for numerous later doses to reduce established symptoms. Numerous times a patient will tell that he or she “took one, and it didn’t work.” If the patient had taken the antihistamine regularly for three to four days to build up blood levels of the medication, it might own been effective.

Side effects: Older (first-generation) antihistamines may cause drowsiness or performance impairment, which can lead to accidents and personal injury. Even when these medications are taken only at bedtime, they can still cause considerable impairment the following day, even in people who do not feel drowsy. For this reason, it is significant that you do not drive a car or work with dangerous machinery when you take a potentially sedating antihistamine.

Some of the newer antihistamines do not cause drowsiness.

A frequent side effect is excessive dryness of the mouth, nose and eyes. Less common side effects include restlessness, nervousness, overexcitability, insomnia, dizziness, headaches, euphoria, fainting, visual disturbances, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distress, constipation, diarrhea, increased or decreased urination, urinary retention, high or low blood pressure, nightmares (especially in children), sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, chest tightness or palpitations.

Men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on antihistamines. Consult your allergist if these reactions occur.

Important precautions:

  1. Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  2. Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  3. Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  4. Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  5. Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy.

    Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.

  6. Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  7. While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  8. Never take anyone else’s medication.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy may be recommended for people who don’t reply well to treatment with medications or who experience side effects from medications, who own allergen exposure that is unavoidable or who desire a more permanent solution to their allergies.

Immunotherapy can be extremely effective in controlling allergic symptoms, but it doesn’t assist the symptoms produced by nonallergic rhinitis.

Two types of immunotherapy are available: allergy shots and sublingual (under-the-tongue) tablets.

  1. Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached.

    Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections. Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish. As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  2. Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily. Treatment can continue for as endless as three years.

    Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.

Intranasal corticosteroids

Intranasal corticosteroids are the single most effective drug class for treating allergic rhinitis. They can significantly reduce nasal congestion as well as sneezing, itching and a runny nose.

Ask your allergist about whether these medications are appropriate and safe for you. These sprays are designed to avoid the side effects that may happen from steroids that are taken by mouth or injection.

Take care not to spray the medication against the middle portion of the nose (the nasal septum). The most common side effects are local irritation and nasal bleeding. Some older preparations own been shown to own some effect on children’s growth; data about some newer steroids don’t indicate an effect on growth.

Eye allergy preparations and eyedrops

Eye allergy preparations may be helpful when the eyes are affected by the same allergens that trigger rhinitis, causing redness, swelling, watery eyes and itching. OTC eyedrops and oral medications are commonly used for short-term relief of some eye allergy symptoms.

They may not relieve every symptoms, though, and prolonged use of some of these drops may actually cause your condition to worsen.

Prescription eyedrops and oral medications also are used to treat eye allergies. Prescription eyedrops provide both short- and long-term targeted relief of eye allergy symptoms, and can be used to manage them.

Check with your allergist or pharmacist if you are unsure about a specific drug or formula.

Immunotherapy should be istered in a setting that permits the immediate recognition and management of adverse reactions. The preferred location for such istration is the prescribing physician’s office.

However, patients can get immunotherapy injections at another health care facility if the physician and staff at that location are trained and equipped to recognize and manage immunotherapy reactions, particularly anaphylaxis. Allergen Immunotherapy: A Practice Parameter 3rd update- Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, AAAAI and ACAAI

Allergy shots are the most effective therapy for treating nasal allergies and their attendant complications. My patients often call them life changing. Despite their effectiveness, numerous patients who would benefit from them select not to utilize this therapy.

The most common reason they select  not to do so is not money, since insurance coverage is generally extremely excellent, or fear of needles, since the injections are relatively painless. The biggest reason is time. Allergy shots must be istered in a medically supervised setting where the provider and staff are familiar with the shot process and own the means to diagnose and manage acute allergic reactions. This means coming to the doctors office to get injections.

Given the busy modern lifestyle, this can be a significant time commitment. So why does it own to be this way?

What is the best nasal spray for allergies

The answer is safety.

Allergy shots are generally a safe procedure, but, love every medical procedures, there is risk involved. Overall, systemic allergic reactions happen in about 1 out of every injections. From , about 5% of patients experienced a systemic reaction. From , this rate fell to about 1% of patients. The tremendous drop in reaction rates is attributable in part to better standardization of allergen extracts and to the widespread implementation of computerized immunotherapy monitoring systems, which drastically reduced dosing errors. Indeed, the most recent data suggests that only 25% of systemic reactions are due to dosing errors, while almost half are due to receiving injections during a severe allergy flare.

Fortunately, most reactions to allergy shots are mild to moderate, but severe reactions, even fatalities, do happen. Fatality rates own remained fairly constant at million injections, about the same risk as being in a commercial airline accident, million flights.

Those numbers should be reassuring to patients but also might lead some to conclude that allergy shots are indeed safe enough for home istration. Theyre not, and heres why: Allergy shots are as safe as they are because the vast majority are given in a medically supervised setting.  All of the above data looking at safety come from patients who received shots at the office of their allergist or another physician.

We dont know what the reaction rates or safety outcomes would own been if the same patient population had been allowed to get injections at home, but I cant imagine that they would be better.

Allergen immunotherapy is a complicated process that requires careful monitoring of doses, frequent dose adjustment, and clinical training to assess if patients are well enough to get their shots. Allergists own years of training and experience in this regard as well as in the diagnosis and management of acute allergic reactions. We own dedicated staff whose sole occupation is to ister injections and computer managed protocols designed to reduce error.

Every of this helps the allergist deliver the most effective therapies with the highest degree of safety. You should accept no less.

Dr. O

Categories: aaaai, acaai, allergic reactions, allergy shots, Anaphylaxis, at home shots, build immunity, Current Topics, immunotherapy | Tags: allergy shots, allergy shots at home, immunotherapy, risk of allergy shots at home, safety of allergy shots at home | Permalink

Avoidance

The first approach in managing seasonal or perennial forms of hay fever should be to avoid the allergens that trigger symptoms.

Outdoor exposure

  1. Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  2. Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  3. Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  4. Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  5. Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  6. Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.

Indoor exposure

  1. Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom.

    Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs. Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least degrees Fahrenheit).

  2. To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often. If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.
  3. Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home.

    Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.

  4. Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.

Exposure to pets

  1. If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible. If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.
  2. Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  3. Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling. Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.

Treatments that are not recommended for allergic rhinitis

  1. Antibiotics: Effective for the treatment of bacterial infections, antibiotics do not affect the course of uncomplicated common colds (a viral infection) and are of no benefit for noninfectious rhinitis, including allergic rhinitis.
  2. Nasal surgery: Surgery is not a treatment for allergic rhinitis, but it may assist if patients own nasal polyps or chronic sinusitis that is not responsive to antibiotics or nasal steroid sprays.

SAN DIEGO—(BUSINESS WIRE)—Innovus Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

(«Innovus Pharma» or the “Company”) (OTCQB Venture Market: INNV), an emerging commercial-stage pharmaceutical company that delivers safe, innovative and effective over-the-counter medicine and consumer care products to improve men’s and women’s health and respiratory diseases, today announced that its FlutiCare® OTC product for the relief of seasonal allergies is currently ranked #2 behind Flonase® in Amazon®’s Fluticasone Propionate and Allergy Nasal Spray categories. In addition, FlutiCare® is currently ranked #6 in Amazon’s Best Moisturizing Nasal Sprays category, #11 in the Best Allergy Medicine category and #41 in the Sinus Medicine category. To meet the growing demand on Amazon® for FlutiCare®, Innovus Pharma placed an additional order of , units with its manufacturer.

FlutiCare® contains the most prescribed nasal steroid athletic pharmaceutical ingredient (“API”) and form for nasal allergy relief over the final 7 years. FlutiCare® is available OTC with the same prescription strength and same delivery method as Flonase®* and ClariSpray®*. The Company currently believes that FlutiCare® is the most affordable fluticasone propionate nasal spray on the market and is now available in a one dose, 30 Day ( Sprays) treatment and is the only one providing a monthly autoship plan.

“We are extremely excited to announce the current high ranking of our FlutiCare® product in certain Amazon indication categories,” said Dr.

Bassam Damaj, President and Chief Executive Officer of Innovus Pharma. “FlutiCare® traces its roots as the most prescribed Rx hour nasal allergy spray API and form in the U.S. over the past 7 years by a factor of over 10 to 1 and the number of units we sell has continued to grow. As sales of the product are increasing significantly, we felt it was necessary to increase our supply of this product to meet our consumers’ growing demand,” he continued.

About FlutiCare®

FlutiCare® is a nasal spray, which provides 50 micrograms of fluticasone propionate (“USP”) per spray, a nasal corticosteroid that provides hour temporary relief of seasonal and perennial nasal allergy symptoms.

FlutiCare® can be used to relieve both indoor and outdoor nasal allergy symptoms caused by pollen, dust, animal dander, and other indoor and outdoor allergens. Nasal allergy symptoms include nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itchy nose, etc.

FlutiCare® contains the nasal steroid API that is physician recommended and consumer preferred.

  1. Familiar to patients, comfort of a known & trusted medicine;
  2. #1 nasal steroid athletic prescribed by physicians;
  3. Engrained in patients’ allergy management; and
  4. #1 form used by patients;
  5. Effective and safe.

About Innovus Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Headquartered in San Diego, Innovus Pharma is an emerging OTC consumer goods and specialty pharmaceutical company engaged in the commercialization, licensing and development of safe and effective non-prescription medicine and consumer care products to improve men’s and women’s health and vitality and respiratory diseases. Innovus Pharma delivers innovative and uniquely presented and packaged health solutions through its (a) OTC medicines and consumer and health products, which we market directly, (b) commercial partners to primary care physicians, urologists, gynecologists and therapists, and (c) directly to consumers through our on-line channels, retailers and wholesalers.

The Company is dedicated to being a leader in developing and marketing new OTC and branded Abbreviated New Drug Application (“ANDA”) products. The Company is actively pursuing opportunities where existing prescription drugs own recently, or are expected to, change from prescription (or Rx) to OTC.

For more information, go to ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; and

Innovus Pharma’s Forward-Looking Safe Harbor:

Statements under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act, as amended: with the exception of the historical information contained in this release, the matters described herein contain forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties that may individually or mutually impact the matters herein described for a variety of reasons that are exterior the control of the Company, including, but not limited to, projected revenues from its FlutiCare® product, estimated market for its products, and statements about achieving its other development, growth, commercialization, financial and staffing objectives.

Readers are cautioned not to put undue reliance on these forward-looking statements as actual results could differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained herein. Readers are urged to read the risk factors set forth in the Company’s most recent filing on Form S-1, annual report on Form K, subsequent quarterly reports filed on Form Q and other filings made with the SEC. Copies of these reports are available from the SEC’s website or without charge from the Company.

*Flonase® is a registered trademark of GSK and ClariSpray® is a registered trademark of Bayer.

How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically. Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone. Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


The Best Research Resources

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

This academy’s website provides valuable information to assist readers determine the difference between colds, allergies, and sinusitis.

A primer guide on sinusitis also provides more specific information about the chronic version of the illness. Additional resources include a «virtual allergist» that helps you to review your symptoms, as well as a database on pollen counts.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)

In addition to providing a comprehensive guide on sinus infections, the ACAAI website also contains a wealth of information on allergies, asthma, and immunology.

The site’s useful tools include a symptom checker, a way to search for an allergist in your area, and a function that allows you to ask an allergist questions about your symptoms.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

For allergy sufferers, the AAFA website contains an easy-to-understand primer on sinusitis. It also provides comprehensive information on various types of allergies, including those with risk factors for sinusitis.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC website provides basic information on sinus infections and other respiratory illnesses, such as common colds, bronchitis, ear infections, flu, and sore throat.

It offers guidance on how to get symptom relief for those illnesses, as well as preventative tips on practicing good hand hygiene, and a recommended immunization schedule.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library.

What is the best nasal spray for allergies

As part of the National Institutes of Health, their website provides the basics on sinus infection. It also contains a number of links to join you with more information on treatments, diagnostic procedures, and related issues.


Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders. Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

IF IT’S NOT AN ALLERGY, THEN WHAT IS IT?

Vasomotor rhinitis produces numerous symptoms which are extremely similar to the symptoms of nasal allergy. The difference is that this disorder is not caused by the allergic antibody and allergy skin tests are generally negative. Occasionally positive skin tests may be observed and patients may own a mixture of allergic and non-allergic rhinitis.

If a nasal smear is performed, there are generally no allergy cells or «eosinophils» in the nasal secretions in patients with vasomotor rhinitis.

The cause of the symptoms of vasomotor rhinitis is not totally understood. Nevertheless, it causes a grand deal of chronic nasal problems. Currently, it is felt that the disorder is due to changes in the blood vessels of the nose, producing swelling of the mucosa or lining of the nose which in turn produces chronic nasal obstruction and nasal discharge.

This is why the disorder is referred to as vasomotor rhinitis; the «vaso» refers to «vascular» or «blood vessels» and «motor» refers to the nerves supplying these blood vessels controlling whether they swell up (dilate) or shrink below (constrict). The nose is richly supplied with blood vessels which enhance its function as a sensory organ and as a filtration system for the air we breathe. These blood vessels are supplied by opposing sets of nerves which automatically control their dilation and con­striction.

In most people, there is an even balance and no problems are encountered with the nose.

For some reason, people with vasomotor rhinitis own an imbalance of the nerve supply to the nose with the finish result being that the blood vessels tend to swell up (dilate) to a wide variety of non-specific things which we own already mentioned.

In other words, VMR is due to extremely sensitive nerve endings, that when irritated lead to the congestion and stuffy nose frequently observed in allergic rhinitis or hay fever. However, the process has nothing to do with the allergic antibody IgE.

TRIGGERS AND IRRITANTS WHICH AGGRAVATE VASOMOTOR RHINITIS

The main trigger for VMR is changes in the weather, and changes in the barometric pressure.

You may notice that you get significant nasal congestion or stuff nose when there is a front moving in, with a rain storm or on days with changes in the humidity. This is essentially due to sensitive nerve endings in the nasal passages leading to over reaction that results in swelling of blood vessels. This leads to the congestion, runny nose, and post nasal drip found in VMR.

In addition to changes in the weather, there are several chemicals and smells that serve as irritants and may worsen the symptoms of VMR.

In specific, this non-specific reactivity maybe aggravated by some of the following:

1. Highly scented cosmetics such as cologne and perfumes.

2. Cigarette or other types of tobacco smoke.

3. Smoke from fireplaces and environmental smoke such as a forest fire or brush fire.

4. Strongly scented soaps, and shampoos.

5. Room deodorants, paints and varnishes, insecticides, and bug sprays.

6. Plants with a strong perfume such as roses, violets, lilacs, goldenrods, and crysanthemums.

7. Kerosene, lighter fluid, fuel oil, and gas fumes.

8. Dust particles.

9. Pollution.

If there is expected unavoidable intense exposure to any of the above, as well as any strong fumes, smoke, paint odors, household odors, industrial exposure, or dust, the use of a mask over the nose and mouth during this exposure is recommended.

These masks can be obtained from the hardware store. However, there are times when triggers or irritants simply can not be avoided, such as changes in the weather.

These irritants are not capable of acting as «allergens» or causing «antibodies» love we see with true allergies. The symptoms of vasomotor rhinitis are thus due to a completely diverse trigger and mechanism than nasal allergies.

WHY ME?

We really don’t understand why one gets this disorder. Since the disorder occurs more frequently in adults, it has also been postulated that hormonal changes may be a factor.

Others feel that global warming, increases in pollution, and the increasing number of chemicals in our daily life may lead to the growing quantity of VMR. There is no firm proof that any one of these is definitely the cause of vasomotor rhinitis. The significant thing is that the disorder is not inherited, does not seem to run in families, and has nothing at every to do with allergies. Because of this, there is no cure for this disease and management is primarily avoidance and treatment with medications.

Your doctor may use similar medications as those used for allergic rhinitis but they may not work as well. Furthermore, higher doses may be needed.

Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders. Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

IS IT AN ALLERGY?

You may ponder you own allergies because you own nasal congestion, runny nose, and maybe even sneezing. However, when you doctor performs allergy tests you are told that there is no evidence of allergy. What could this possibly be?

Vasomotor rhinitis is a disorder which is frequently seen in allergy practice but has nothing at every to do with true allergic disease. See the sections on allergic disease to understand how the allergic antibody, or IgE, works and how this leads to allergy symptoms.

Vasomotor rhinitis is a poorly understood disorder which mimics numerous of the symptoms of nasal allergy, but has a completely diverse basis. Failure to recognize these differences has led to a grand deal of misunderstanding about this disorder.

To understand vasomotor rhinitis (VMR) otherwise known as non-allergic rhinitis it is worthwhile to first discuss allergic rhinitis. Nasal allergies, or allergic rhinitis, own two distinct clinical forms. One form is referred to as «hayfever» or seasonal allergic rhinitis, which occurs at a specific time or season of the year due to exposure to «pollens» or «allergens» such as grass and ragweed.

Another form is associated with nasal symptoms throughout the year without definite seasonal variation, and more commonly is due to the allergens such as home dust, mold, mildew, and animal dander. This year circular form is called perennial allergic rhinitis. Patients may frequently own both.

Nasal allergies tend to happen in families with a predisposition to «react» to exposure to «allergens» by producing antibodies against these «allergens». In other words, there is a genetic component to allergies, so if someone in your family has allergies you may be at increased risk. These «antibodies», called IgE (Immunoglobulin E) are produced in the blood stream, but also happen in the skin, which makes it possible to protest these «antibodies» by allergy skin tests.

A positive test produces a large red area and possibly even a «hive» at the site of the skin test.

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The reactions seen in the skin mirror the reactions which happen in other organs such as the eyes and nose.

The basis of the nasal symptoms in allergic individuals is due to the interaction of the «allergens», or the things that you are allergic to such as grass pollen, with the antibodies produced against them. Once this interaction takes put there is recruitment of other allergy cells into the site of the allergic reaction. These cells are a type of white blood cells called «eosinophils». In the case of nasal allergies they can be found in the nasal cavity and secretions by looking at a nasal smear.

This is done with a q-tip placed into the nose and a little sample or smear is taken to be looked at under the microscope. Nasal smears are rarely done during the evaluation of nasal allergies exterior of research.

The symptoms of nasal allergy generally include runny nose and nasal congestion, and are generally associated with frequent sneezing episodes and itching of the nose, eyes, ears, and roof of the mouth on exposure to an «allergen». Other evidence of allergy frequently is present in the same individuals, such as asthma or eczema.

Treatment of these allergic disorders involves avoidance of the allergens when possible, nasal sprays, antihistamines, and sometimes «allergy shots» or «immunotherapy» to reduce sensitivity to those allergens which cannot be avoided completely.

Patients with VMR may own extremely similar symptoms and goes years treating themselves for presumed allergies. In fact, VMR is frequently missed or misdiagnosed as allergies by patients and primary care providers same. It is significant to make the correct diagnosis, both for education about avoidance as well as for treatment options.

WHAT CAN BE DONE?

Unfortunately, the disorder of vasomotor rhinitis cannot be cured at the present time but represents a disease with a protracted course of chronic nasal symptoms.

Management is focused on managing the symptoms of nasal congestion, runny nose, and post nasal drip. There is no use for allergy injections in the setting of VMR as patients do not own an allergy.

There are some general measures which may reduce your symptoms of vasomotor rhinitis, and are as significant as specific medications in the overall management of this problem. Obviously, avoidance of things which are known to precipitate symptoms should be encouraged. One can not avoid changes in the weather but avoidance of strong odors and especially smoke may be helpful.

Almost every patients require some form of medication to improve symptoms.

Other non-specific irritants should also be avoided. This is particularly true of home dust which is a strong irritant in numerous patients with vasomotor rhinitis. Instructions for avoidance of home dust will be given separately. Ingestion of alcoholic beverages, particularly beer and wine, often aggravate the symptoms of vasomotor rhinitis and should be recognized as possible factors to be avoided. Occasionally, drugs you may be taking for other reasons, such as aspirin and drugs for high blood pressure such as Reserpine and Propranalol, may make these symptoms worse. If you are taking other medications you should discuss each with your doctor to see if they are a factor.

The most common medications include nose drops and decongestant tablets.

The over the counter nose drops that are vasoconstrictors (shrink the blood vessel in the nose) such as Afrin, Neosynephrine, and others may produce a dramatic improvement in symptoms. Unfortunately, frequent use of these sprays irritates the nose and eventually does more harm than excellent. When used more than 3 to 5 days patients develop a rebound of symptoms and an increased dependence on the sprays. In general, the over the counter nose sprays should be avoided as controller medications for VMR, given the risk of rebound and «nasal addiction».

Specific treatment of vasomotor rhinitis involves the istration of «decongestants».

These work by shrinking below the blood vessels in the nose. These medications can be in the form or a prescription nasal spray or a tablet taken by mouth. Of the currently approved prescription nasal sprays only a nasal antihistamine spray (Astelin) has been proven in studies for the FDA to treat the symptoms of VMR. However, your doctor may start with a nasal steroid since it may also decrease the inflammation in the nasal passage found in VMR.

Decongestant tablets (like pseudofed) and combination antihistamine-decongestant tablets work better than pure antihistamines. In fact, over the counter antihistamines love benadryl, zyrtec and claritin own not been shown to work well for VMR as these products tend to treat allergy. Chronic daily, therapy seems to work better than intermittent therapy. However, the decongestant tablets can lead to potential problems such as high blood pressure, other heart problems. Therefore, treatment with nasal sprays is encouraged and patients may use oral decongestants as periodic save therapy for times of severe symptoms. Furthermore, you will not develop rebound or «nasal addiction» to the prescription nasal sprays and these are generally considered some of the safest medications that you may take.

Treatment of complicating diseases such as nasal polyps, chronic sinusitis, and nasal septal deviation often require cooperation between the allergist and the ear­nose-and-throat physicians.

In addition, if you do own allergies, avoidance of treatment of the allergic responses will assist with your over every symptoms.

DON’T GET DISCOURAGED! Although we can’t cure the disorder, it can generally be controlled with medications. You may own to attempt a few diverse types of sprays before you discover the one the works for you. Your best efforts should be to discover a excellent allergist who can assist and guide you through this process.


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