What is the best medicine for dogs with allergies

One of the most mind-boggling choices dog and cat owners face is how to safely guard against fleas and ticks.

What is the best medicine for dogs with allergies

Those creepy crawlers aren’t just gross; they can transmit disease to both pets and people. Pets need protection, but numerous of the solutions on store shelves are loaded with chemicals that could be risky to their health—and yours.

So what’s a responsible pet lover to do? The key is to stop the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from allowing these harmful products to reach store shelves in the first put. Until the EPA does this, however, you can educate yourself about the risks and benefits of various treatment options, then bring that knowledge to the store. There are ways to hold every your family members, including the furry ones, safe from dangerous pests and the most toxic ingredients.

The perils of pest protection

Most conventional flea and tick products—including collars, topical treatments, sprays, and dusts—are registered as pesticides and regulated by the EPA.

(Those given orally, love pills, must be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug istration.) But here’s the ugly truth: Numerous of the pesticides allowed for use on pets are linked to serious health issues in people, such as cancer and neurological and respiratory problems. Pets can also suffer: Skin irritation, neurological problems, gastrointestinal disorders, and even organ failure own been reported as a result of pet poisonings.

The government has faced criticism from NRDC and other watchdog groups about insufficient safety standards for these products.

Consumers, as well as some veterinarians, don’t know the whole tale, says NRDC senior scientist Miriam Rotkin-Ellman. “Many vets count on the EPA to make certain that the products on the market are safe if used correctly.” Unfortunately, the ingredients in these products are still fairly dangerous, and regular use can result in unsafe exposure, particularly for children and pregnant women.

For example, even low-level exposure to organophosphates and carbamates—two particularly dangerous families of pesticides found in some flea treatments as well as in agricultural and lawn products—have been linked to learning disabilities in children.

For this reason, most household uses of these pesticides own already been banned. Unfortunately, kids can still be exposed to them from their furry siblings’ flea collars or other products.

Going nontoxic. Fortunately for numerous families, fleas can be controlled without resorting to harmful chemicals. Always attempt the strategies under first before considering chemicals—safer chemicals—if additional protection is needed. Here’s what you can do:

Groom your pets regularly. Common soap and water will kill adult fleas.

In addition, comb your animal’s fur with a fine-tooth flea comb, and dunk any critters into a container of sudsy water.

Clean, clean, clean. Wash your pet’s bedding weekly in boiling, soapy water, and vacuum and wipe below pet-frequented surfaces often, including behind and underneath furniture and between sofa cushions. If you’re the victim of a flea infestation, Karyn Bischoff, a toxicologist at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, recommends doing this daily. For severe cases, professional steam cleaning may be needed for your carpets.

Take preemptive steps in your yard and garden.

It helps to put beneficial nematodes—worms that eat flea larvae—in the soil where your pet is likely to frolic. Discover them in garden supply stores or online.

Diatomaceous ground is a less toxic option for the home and yard, says Rotkin-Ellman, “but it can be really damaging if it is inhaled or gets into your or your pet’s eyes.” Use caution and protective gear, and use it only in areas where pets and kids won’t be exposed. Glance for products marketed to control pests, and avoid the helpful used in swimming-pool systems.

Be wary of products marketed as “natural.” Sadly, there’s no magic nontoxic bullet to wipe out these pests.

Natural products and herbal remedies should also be approached with caution. They may not work—and some aren’t safe, says Bischoff. Numerous of these contain peppermint, cinnamon, lemongrass, cedarwood, or rosemary oil. While these may be safer than some of the synthetic chemicals, they own also been linked to allergies in both pets and humans, and not much is known about how well they actually work. If you give these a attempt, monitor your pet and family closely for adverse reactions.

Considering chemicals

There are varying degrees of harm when it comes to these products and the chemicals they contain. Work with your vet to craft a custom plan for your pet, and hold some basic guidelines in mind to spot safer products:

Ask about oral flea-prevention treatments. Pills with the athletic ingredients lufenuron, nitenpyram, or spinosad can be a better option, for both animals and humans, than treatments that leave residue on fur that might get on hands or furniture.

But oral meds need to be prescribed by a vet and are considerably more expensive, so they may not be a realistic option for every pet owners.

Identify safer ingredients. If chemical products are necessary for additional flea or tick control, NRDC recommends s-methoprene or pyriproxyfen, which are less toxic ingredients—but read the labels carefully because some products use them with other, more harmful pesticides. Avoid products that include synthetic neonicotinoids (like imidacloprid and dinotefuran), which are harmful to bees and may be toxic to the developing brain of young kids.

Be wary of flea collars. These products can contain some of the most dangerous insecticides, including tetrachlorvinphos, carbaryl, and propoxur.

Some of the collars posing the greatest risk are already being phased out of production, and NRDC is suing the EPA to ban the relax. Until that happens (and until older products are off store shelves entirely), either avoid collars altogether or be vigilant about searching labels for those specific athletic ingredients.

Use additional caution with tick products. When it comes to tick prevention—or combination flea-and-tick products—the news is even grimmer.

Most products designed to repel these buggers include possible carcinogens and nervous-system toxins love fipronil, permethrin, pyrethrins, or imidacloprid. “Our recommendation for ticks is to use the least toxic option available, at the lowest level, and only when you need it,” Rotkin-Ellman says. If you live in an area where ticks and Lyme disease are prevalent, you probably need protection—but talk to your vet about how much and how often.

Pregnant women and young children should minimize their exposure.

Buy a species-specific product. Two common ingredients in flea-and-tick products, permethrin and pyrethrins, are extremely toxic to cats. Don’t put these ingredients on your dog, either, if you also own a cat that could snuggle up with or brush against it.

Choose the correct formula for your pet’s weight. An EPA investigation showed that little dogs (10 to 20 pounds) were most likely to own reactions such as rashes, vomiting, diarrhea, and seizures from topical treatments. Dogs that are ancient, young, ill, or on meds are also at higher risk. (Flea and tick control can interfere with other medications, rendering them ineffective or even poisonous.) There are even breed-specific sensitivities, so a conversation with your vet is in order before you decide how to proceed.

Don’t rely on shampoos. Flea and tick shampoo may seem love a safer, more cost-effective option, but they often contain numerous of the same ingredients as topical treatments and can cause adverse reactions and allergies, Bischoff says.

Moreover, they’re not meant to take the put of preventive options. “You’d use a shampoo for an animal with an infestation and then, generally, follow up with a topical treatment,” she says. Read labels, and take the same precautions with shampoos as you would with spot-on or collar products.

Report health issues immediately. If you or your pet reacts to a pet product containing pesticides, call your local poison control middle, talk to your doctor, and, later, report it to the National Pesticide Information Middle at

Overview
Your dog’s eye(s) can become inflamed for a variety of reasons, ranging from conditions that are simple to repair to some that are extremely serious.

Some of the most common are:

  1. Glaucoma: a much more serious condition caused by increased pressure within the eye itself
  2. Scratched cornea: a scratch on the eye can develop into a more serious condition, such as an ulcer
  3. Allergies: as with us, our pets can suffer from allergy-induced itchy, watery eyes 
  4. Foreign body: a foreign object in the eye, even eyelashes, can cause the eye to be irritated
  5. Conjunctivitis: the mucus membranes of the eye become inflamed and itchy (This is the most common eye problem among our four-legged friends.) 
  6. Entropion: when the eyelashes are turned inward instead of outward, causing the eye to tear, become irritated, and ultimately infected, if not treated

There are numerous less common eye conditions that can cause eye inflammation.

Your veterinarian will work to identify what is troubling your teary-eyed friend.

Symptoms
The most common sign your pooch’s eyes are irritated is redness. Additionally, she may blink or squint excessively, hold her eye closed, rub or paw at her eye, and her eye might tear a lot. There may also be some mucus or pus-like discharge around your dog’s eye(s).

Diagnosis/Treatment
If you ponder your pet’s eyes are irritated, you should contact your veterinarian for advice.

Numerous of the most common situations need medical attention in order to get better. Your veterinarian will most likely act out a finish ophthalmic examination to determine the cause of the inflammation. In more serious situations, they may send you to a dog eye expert, also referred to as a veterinary ophthalmologist.

Your veterinarian will advise you regarding the best way to care for your pet’s eye(s). One of the most common treatments is to apply medicated drops or ointment to the affected eye. Having your compadre sit still while you apply the medication can be challenging. For assist with this, watch an expert apply eye drops to a dog.

Prevention
Because there are so numerous diverse causes of eye inflammation, there is no single prevention that works for every situation. To assist your dog reduce the risk of eye problems, check her eyes daily for any obvious signs of irritation, such as redness or tearing.

If you own any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian – they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.

At Carolina Asthma & Allergy Middle, we’re committed to providing the highest quality asthma and allergy care in North and South Carolina.

To better serve both states, our Rock Hill location is located near the South Carolina border, making it easily accessible to South Carolina residents in Rock Hill, Fort Mill, and Lake Wylie as well as North Carolina areas such as Pineville.

We own five medical experts on hand at our Rock Hill office, including Natasha Laungani, FNP-C; S. Nicole Chadha, MD; Roopen R. Patel, MD; Susan I. Hungness, MD; and Glenn W. Errington, MD. Dr. Laungani, who is exclusive to our Rock Hill location, studied at the University of Kentucky and the University of Cincinnati.

Dr. Errington specializes in children over two years ancient and adults. He received certifications through the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Allergy and Immunology.

You’ll discover our shot room at our Rock Hill office as well, which is open until p.m. on weekdays. This is for our allergy patients dealing with skin allergies, food allergies, insect allergies, and more. Our patients who need allergy treatment or asthma treatment can set up an appointment for any day of the week until 5 p.m. with one of our specialists. The phone number for our Carolina Asthma & Allergy Middle, including our Rock Hill office, is

Schedule an Appointment

To schedule or update an appointment and general questions, please call

Diagnosis

Allergy testing is the best diagnostic tool and the best road to treatment for dogs that are suffering from moderate and severe allergies.

There are several diverse testing methods available. The most common is a blood test that checks for antigen induced antibodies in the dog’s blood. Intradermal skin testing may also be performed. In this method of testing, a little quantity of antigen is injected into a shaved portion of the dog’s skin. This is done in a specific pattern and order so that if the dog shows a little raised reaction, the offending antigen can be identified. After a period of time (hours), the shaved area is examined to detect which antigens, if any, created a reaction. Allergy testing is performed to develop a specific therapy for the allergic animal.

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One of the most common medical complaints that we see in our office is dogs with skin infections, “hot spots”, or allergic dermatitis, also known as atopic (atopy) dermatitis.

Unlike people who react to allergens most commonly with nasal symptoms and/or hives, dogs react with skin and/or gastrointestinal problems.

This is because there are a higher proportion of mast cells, which release histamines and other vasoactive substances in the face of an allergic challenge, in the skin of dogs. These problems may range from poor jacket texture or hair length, to itching and chewing, to boiling spots and self-mutilation, gastrointestinal pain and discomfort, diarrhea, and flatulence. Allergies may also frolic a part in chronic ear infections. The most common causes of canine allergic dermatitis are flea allergy, food allergy, inhalant or contact allergy, and allergy to the normal bacterial flora and yeast organisms of the skin. To make matters more hard to diagnose and treat, thyroid disease may add to the problem as well.

Canine atopic dermatitis (allergic dermatitis, canine atopy) is an inherited predisposition to develop allergic symptoms following repeated exposure to some otherwise harmless substance, an “allergen”.

Most dogs start to show their allergic signs between 1 and 3 years of age. Due to the hereditary nature of the disease, several breeds, including Golden Retrievers, most terriers, Irish Setters, Lhasa Apsos, Dalmatians, Bulldogs, and Ancient English Sheep dogs are more commonly atopic, but numerous dogs, including mixed breed dogs can own atopic dermatitis. Atopic animals will generally rub, lick, chew, bite, or scratch at their feet, flanks, ears, armpits, or groin, causing patchy or inconsistent hair loss and reddening and thickening of the skin.

What is the best medicine for dogs with allergies

The skin itself may be dry and crusty or oily depending upon the dog. Dogs may also rub their face on the carpet; ear flaps may become red and boiling. Because the wax-producing glands of the ear overproduce as a response to the allergy, they get bacterial and yeast (Malassezia ) infections of the ear.

In order to overcome these frustrating symptoms, your veterinarian’s approach needs to be thorough and systematic. Shortcuts generally will not produce results and only add to owner frustration and canine discomfort.

Inhalant and Contact Allergies
Substances that can cause an allergic reaction in dogs are much the same as those that cause reactions in people including the pollens of grasses, trees and weeds, dust mites, and molds.

A clue to diagnosing these allergies is to glance at the timing of the reaction. Does it happen year round? This may be mold or dust. If the reaction is seasonal, pollens may be the culprit.

Food Allergies
Numerous people don’t suspect food allergies as the cause of their dog’s itching because their pet has been fed the same food every its life and has just recently started having symptoms. However, animals can develop allergies to a substance over time, so this fact does not law out food allergies. Another common misconception is that dogs are only sensitive to poor quality food.

If the dog is allergic to an ingredient, it doesn’t matter whether it is in premium food or the most inexpensive brand on the market. One advantage to premium foods is that some avoid common fillers that are often implicated in allergic reactions.

Flea Allergies
This type of reaction generally is not to the flea itself, but rather to proteins in its saliva. Interestingly enough, the dogs most prone to this problem are not dogs who are constantly flea ridden, but those who are exposed only occasionally! A single bite can cause a reaction for five to seven days, so you don’t need a lot of fleas to own a miserable dog.

Staphylococcus Hypersensitivity
Bacterial hypersensitivity occurs when a dog’s immune system overreacts to the normal Staphylococcus (Staph) bacteria on its skin.

It appears that bacterial hypersensitivity in the dog is more likely to happen if other conditions such as hypothyroidism, inhalant allergy, and/or flea allergy are concurrently present. Bacterial hypersensitivity is diagnosed through bacterial culture and examination of a biopsy sample. Microscopically, there are certain unique changes in the blood vessels of the skin in bacterial hypersensitivity.

Treatment

Medicated Baths
Numerous medicated shampoos own compounds in them that are aimed at soothing injured skin and calming inflammation.

In addition, frequent bathing (weekly to every other week) of the dog can remove allergens from the hair jacket, which may contribute to skin allergy flare-ups. The medicated baths we recommend are those that actually contain antimicrobial and antifungal agents as well as ingredients that permit the skin to be bathed on a more frequent basis without drying it out. Application of a rinse afterwards also helps to prevent drying out of the skin and hair coat.

Antihistamines
Antihistamines can be used with excellent safety in dogs. About one third of owners report success with antihistamines.

These medications tend to own a variable effect between dogs. For some allergic dogs, antihistamines work extremely well in controlling symptoms of allergic skin disease. For other dogs, extremely little effect is seen.

What is the best medicine for dogs with allergies

Therefore, a minimum of three diverse types of antihistamines should be tried before owners give up on this therapy. Examples of antihistamines commonly used for dogs include Benadryl, Chlortrimeton, Atarax, Claritin, Zyrtec, and Clemastine. However, antihistamines are considered to be worth trying in most cases since the side effects associated with antihistamines is low, and they are typically inexpensive medications.

Antibiotics and Antifungal Medications
Antibiotics are frequently needed to treat secondary skin infections. Anti-fungal medications are frequently needed to treat secondary yeast infections.

Flea Control
For dogs with this problem, a strict flea control regime must be maintained.

The best flea control options include the use of products such as Advantage, Revolution, Frontline, Comfortis, and Sentinel.

Supplements
The Omega-3 and Omega-6 essential fatty acid supplements work by improving the overall health of the skin. These fatty acids are natural anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agents. They reportedly are helpful in 20% of allergic dogs. My own experience puts this figure a little higher. They are certainly worth a attempt because they are not harmful and own virtually no side effects.

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish oils and omega-6 fatty acids are derived from plants containing gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). These supplements are diverse from those sold to produce a glossy jacket. Products that contain both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids include Allergen Caps and Halo.

Hypoallergenic Diets
Allergies develop through exposure, so most hypoallergenic diets incorporate proteins and carbohydrates that your dog has never had before. As mentioned previously, the quickest and best way to determine which foods your dog may or may not be allergic to is through diagnostic allergy testing.

As dairy, beef, and wheat are responsible for 80% of food allergies in dogs, these items should be avoided. Novel protein sources used in hypoallergenic diets include venison, egg, duck, kangaroo, and types of fish not generally found in pet food. Carbohydrate sources include potatoes, peas, yams, sweet potatoes, and canned pumpkin.

Hydrolyzed protein diets are diets in which the protein source has been synthetically reduced to little fragments. The theory behind feeding a hydrolyzed protein source is that the proteins in the food should be little enough that the allergic dog’s immune system will not recognize the protein fragments and will not mount an immune response resulting in an allergy.

Most pets with food allergies reply well when switched to a store-bought hypoallergenic diet, but occasionally an animal suffers from such extreme allergies that a homemade diet is the only option.

In this case, the diet should be customized with the aid of a veterinarian.

Corticosteroids and Immunosuppressive Agents
Cortisone products such as prednisone, prednisolone, and dexamethasone reduce itching by reducing inflammation.

What is the best medicine for dogs with allergies

These medications are not without side effects, so they need to be used judiciously in treating skin allergies. Steroids should be considered only when the allergy season is short, the quantity of drug required is little, or to relieve a dog in extreme discomfort. Side effects can include increased thirst and appetite, increased need to urinate, and behavioral changes. Long-term use can result in diabetes and decreased resistance to infection.

What is the best medicine for dogs with allergies

In some dogs, endless term, low-dose alternate day therapy is the only management protocol that successfully controls the atopic pet. This protocol should be used only as a final resort after every other methods own been exhausted to avoid the potential long-term complications of the medication.

Cyclosporine (Atopica) is a medication, which seems to be fairly effective at reducing the inflammation associated with skin allergies and calming the immune system of the affected dog. However, the pricing of cyclosporine may be prohibitive for larger breed dogs.

Immunotherapy (Hypo-sensitization)
Allergy shots are extremely safe, and numerous people own grand success with them; however, they are extremely slow to work.

It may be six to twelve months before improvement is seen. Once the allergens for the dog are identified, an appropriate immunotherapy is manufactured for that specific dog, and treatment can start. After the offending antigens are identified, then a mixture of these antigens can be formulated into a hyposensitizing injection. Depending on the type of agents used, these injections will be given over a period of weeks to months until the dog or cat develops immunity to the agents. After initial protection, an occasional booster may own to be given.

Environmental Control
If you know which substances your dog is allergic to, avoidance is the best method of control.

Even if you are desensitizing the dog with allergy shots, it is best to avoid the allergen altogether. Molds can be reduced by using a dehumidifier or placing activated charcoal on top of the exposed dirt in your home plants. Dusts and pollens are best controlled by using an air cleaner with a HEPA filter. Air conditioning can also reduce circulating amounts of airborne allergens because windows are then kept closed.

Thyroid Medication
Healthy skin and a normal hair jacket are the results of numerous factors, both external and internal.

There are several glands in the body responsible for the production of hormones that are vital for the regulation of other body functions as well as a normal skin surface and hair jacket. Hypothyroidism may result in poor skin and hair jacket, including hair loss or abnormal hair turnover, dull or brittle hair, altered pigmentation, and oily or dry skin. A blood test is a simplest and most direct way to tell if your dog is hypothyroid. Thyroid testing may include every or part of the following:

Baseline T4 Test or Entire T4 (TT4): This is the most common test.

Dogs with a failure of the thyroid gland will own a lowered level of the T4 hormone. However, there are other conditions that can cause the T4 to decrease, so if this test comes back positive for hypothyroidism your vet should recommend an additional blood test, either the T3 Test or the Baseline TSH test.

Baseline TSH Test: Measures the level of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone. In combination with the T4 or T3 test, it provides a more finish picture of the hormonal activity of your dog’s thyroid gland.

Free T4 by RIA (radio immunoassay): The Free T4 test using RIA techniques does not appear to be more or less precise than the above TT4 test.

Free T4 by ED (equilibrium dialysis): This test may provide more precise data on the level of T4 hormone in your dog’s bloodstream.

Baseline T3 Test: In combination with the T4 or TSH test, these two blood tests can give a clearer picture of the hormone levels found in the bloodstream.

This test is not dependable when used alone. The T3 Test should always be given in combination with one of the other blood tests.

TSH Response Test: In this test, the veterinarian takes an initial measurement of the thyroid hormones in your dog’s bloodstream and then injects Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) into the vein. After 6 hours, a blood sample is drawn and the level of T4 is checked. If your dog has hypothyroidism, the level of T4 will not increase even after the TSH is injected.

This is an expensive test and is being used less often due to decreased production by the manufacturers.

Hypothyroidism is treated with a daily dose of synthetic thyroid hormone called thyroxine (levothyroxine). Blood samples will need to be drawn periodically to assess the effectiveness of the dosage and make any adjustments necessary.

Successful management of the atopic, allergic dog is sometimes complicated and frustrating because multi-modal management is necessary in the majority of cases to control the allergic flare-ups. Proper diagnosis by a veterinarian and owner compliance and follow up care is essential to maximize the chances of curing or at least controlling the severely affected allergy patient.



You may own heard that "animal dander" from your pet(s) may worsen your asthma. In fact, every furry/feathered animals produce animal dander.

Thus, any pet dander puts asthmatics at an increased risk of poor asthma control if they are sensitive.

This is not a little problem. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, as numerous as 30% of every asthmatics own an allergy to dogs or cats. While numerous people associate asthma-related symptoms with hair, it is actually the dander causing problems.


How to Decrease Exposure

Removing your pet from the home and avoiding contact with the pet is the most effective way to decrease exposure to animal dander. A "trial removal" is not recommended as it may take as numerous as 20 weeks following removal for allergen levels to drop to levels similar to those of homes without pets.

If you do remove the pet from the home, make certain you thoroughly clean every bedding products, floors, carpets and other surfaces where dander may collect.

If pet removal is going to produce depression, crying and gnashing of teeth for you or your kid, making the pet an "outside only" animal is a partial solution, but will not fully decrease your exposure to animal dander. If that is also too restrictive, consider the following suggestions:

  1. Do not own the allergic person clean the animal's cage, living space, or litter box.
  2. Unfortunately, frequent vacuuming does not decrease dander exposure, but using a HEPA vacuum filter or double bag may decrease exposure if you must vacuum. If you are the impacted individual, wear a dust mask while vacuuming.
  3. HEPA clean air filters may reduce your allergen exposure. You may also desire to consider a HEPA filter specifically for the bedroom.
  4. Change clothes after prolonged playing or exposure to your pet.
  5. Keep pets away from fabric-covered furniture, carpets, and stuffed toys as much as possible.
  6. Consider bathing the animal weekly to reduce allergen exposure, but realize this may increase dander exposure if the allergic person is doing the washing.
  7. Remove wall to wall carpet if possible.

    Consider hardwood, tile or linoleum flooring as these products do not retain allergens love carpeting. If removing carpet is not an option, steam clean frequently. Remove the animal's favorite furniture as this is a haven for dander.

  8. Keep the pet out of bedrooms and other places where you or your kid spends a lot of time. You spend as much as a third of your life in the bedroom and this will decrease exposure significantly.
  9. Talk to your doctor about allergy shots or immunotherapy.


Symptoms of a Pet Allergy

You are likely to experience these symptoms if animal dander gets to your lungs. However, you need to be aware of other symptoms too.

For example, you might only experience allergic-type symptoms such as a runny or stuffy nose.

What is the best medicine for dogs with allergies

Likewise, you might experience a scratchy throat or watery, itchy eyes.

Finally, if you get scratched you might experience redness on the impacted area or symptoms on an area you self-inoculate (if you touch the area that was scratched or licked and rub it with a hand and then touch your hand to your nose or eyes).

If you are not terribly sensitive or you are not exposed to large amounts of dander, your reaction could happen days later making it more hard to link the pet exposure to symptoms.


What Animal Dander Is

While it is commonly thought that it is the hair from pets that causes the allergic cascade leading to asthma symptoms and short-haired animals are less allergic for asthmatics, both are myths. In fact, it is dander or the proteins in skin flakes, urine, feces, saliva and hair that trigger your asthma symptoms.

These proteins are extremely little particles that are carried through the air and can come to land on a body part that comes into contact with your nose or mouth (like your finger) or the particles can be directly inhaled into the lung. You may notice symptoms immediately or may not develop them for 8 to 12 hours.


Treatments

The best treatment is to avoid exposure altogether.

This, however, is not always optimal or possible. If your best friend has an animal you are allergic to, it just may not be possible to avoid exposure. This can be especially concerning for kids who cannot participate in certain activities resulting in social stigma or unhappiness because they are diverse. You may desire to talk with your doctor about medicines you might be capable to take beforehand for planned exposures.


Any Pet With Fur Carries Pet Dander Around the Home

Pets every shed a certain quantity of allergen-producing dander per week.

In this sense, there are no hypoallergenic pets but some produce less allergen than others and may be a better choice if you really desire a pet.

Any pet with fur carries pet dander around your home and on you if they hop in your lap. Interestingly, it is a myth that it's the fur of animals that leads to the problems asthmatics experience. Just the same, long-haired animals may be more likely to collect and carry dander compared to animals with shorter hair.

According to the American Lung Association, while dogs are more common in homes compared to cats (32% versus 27%), cat allergies are reported twice as often than dog allergies.


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