What is safe to take for allergies when pregnant

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  • Secondary High Blood Pressure
  • Sernivo — Medication
  • Self-Esteem, Ages 6 to 10
  • Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB): What You Need to Know
  • Sensory and Motor Growth in Newborns
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
  • Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  • Seniortopix Healix — Medication
  • Semen Analysis — Medical Test
  • Sedimentation Rate (Sed Rate) — Medical Test
  • selegiline (oral) — Medication
  • Sexual Abuse: Signs and Symptoms
  • Seabather’s Eruption
  • Self-Care for Sjögren’s Syndrome
  • Selenium TR — Medication
  • Self-Care for AIDS Caregivers
  • Sexual Abuse or Assault (Rape)
  • Sexuality While Breastfeeding
  • Sepsis (Septic Shock)
  • SenoSol-X — Medication
  • Self-Care After a Stroke
  • Severity of Back Injuries
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Patient Information [NCI]
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 12 to 24 Months
  • Seizures
  • Separation Protests: Helping Your Child
  • Secura Protective Cream — Medication
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months
  • Senna-gen — Medication
  • Sex and Your Heart
  • Sensual Exercises for Erection Problems
  • semaglutide — Medication
  • Seasonale — Medication
  • selenium — Medication
  • Sex During Pregnancy
  • Senior Health
  • Serax — Medication
  • Senokot — Medication
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Health Professional Information [NCI]
  • Secondary Adrenocortical Insufficiency
  • Second-Trimester Exams and Tests
  • SenoSol-SS — Medication
  • selegiline (transdermal) — Medication
  • Seasonique — Medication
  • Seminoma Testicular Cancer, Stage I, Deciding About Treatment
  • senna — Medication
  • Self-Test for Breath Alcohol — Medical Test
  • Senna S — Medication
  • Senna Smooth — Medication
  • Seromycin — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing
  • Semprex-D — Medication
  • Septocaine — Medication
  • Serotonin Syndrome
  • SenoSol — Medication
  • Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
  • Senokot Additional — Medication
  • Serevent Diskus — Medication
  • Sennalax-S — Medication
  • Sexuality and Physical Changes With Aging
  • Setting Goals
  • Seizure Medicine Levels in Blood — Medical Test
  • Sexual Problems in Women
  • Senokot S — Medication
  • Senna Lax — Medication
  • sevelamer — Medication
  • Sex After Childbirth
  • SEROquel XR — Medication
  • Self-Test for Anxiety
  • Serum Osmolality — Medical Test
  • SenokotXTRA — Medication
  • Self-Care Supplies
  • SEROquel — Medication
  • Senna Plus — Medication
  • Selsun Blue Balanced Treatment — Medication
  • Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
  • Sensorcaine — Medication
  • Seconal Sodium — Medication
  • Secura Antifungal — Medication
  • Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) — Medical Test
  • selexipag — Medication
  • Serostim — Medication
  • secnidazole — Medication
  • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
  • Sexual Orientation
  • secukinumab — Medication
  • Septra I.V.

    — Medication

  • Seebri Neohaler — Medication
  • Sensory and Motor Development From Age 6 to 10 Years
  • Senokot To Go — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  • Segluromet — Medication
  • Self-Examination for Dental Plaque — Medical Test
  • Sexual and Reproductive Organs
  • Sensipar — Medication
  • Sensory Processing Disorder
  • Selzentry — Medication
  • SelRx — Medication
  • Senexon — Medication
  • Self-Massage
  • Seb-Prev — Medication
  • sertaconazole topical — Medication
  • sebelipase alfa — Medication
  • Senna — Medication
  • sertraline — Medication
  • Seborrheic Keratoses
  • Sectral — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Genital Exam for Men
  • selenium sulfide topical — Medication
  • secobarbital — Medication
  • Sexual Health
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Treatment
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  • Selsun Blue Balanced Treatment — Medication
  • secobarbital — Medication
  • Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  • Selsun Blue Balanced Treatment — Medication
  • semaglutide — Medication
  • Seasonique — Medication
  • Senna Smooth — Medication
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
  • senna — Medication
  • Senokot S — Medication
  • Serostim — Medication
  • SEROquel — Medication
  • Seasonale — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Genital Exam for Men
  • Sex and Your Heart
  • Sexuality While Breastfeeding
  • SEROquel XR — Medication
  • selenium sulfide topical — Medication
  • Segluromet — Medication
  • Separation Protests: Helping Your Child
  • Sexuality and Physical Changes With Aging
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months
  • SEROquel — Medication
  • Seabather’s Eruption
  • Septra I.V.

    — Medication

  • Senokot To Go — Medication
  • SenoSol — Medication
  • Serostim — Medication
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
  • Secura Antifungal — Medication
  • Serotonin Syndrome
  • Second-Trimester Exams and Tests
  • Setting Goals
  • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
  • SenoSol — Medication
  • Secondary Adrenocortical Insufficiency
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Treatment
  • Sernivo — Medication
  • Senexon — Medication
  • Seminoma Testicular Cancer, Stage I, Deciding About Treatment
  • selegiline (oral) — Medication
  • SEROquel XR — Medication
  • secukinumab — Medication
  • While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  • sertaconazole topical — Medication
  • Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom.

    Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs. Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least degrees Fahrenheit).

  • Seromycin — Medication
  • Senna S — Medication
  • Seconal Sodium — Medication
  • Sexual Health
  • Sexual Abuse or Assault (Rape)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections
  • Seborrheic Keratoses
  • Sensory Processing Disorder
  • sertraline — Medication
  • Seromycin — Medication
  • Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB): What You Need to Know
  • Sexuality and Physical Changes With Aging
  • Sexuality While Breastfeeding
  • Self-Care After a Stroke
  • Serum Osmolality — Medical Test
  • SenoSol-X — Medication
  • Senna Lax — Medication
  • Severity of Back Injuries
  • Sepsis (Septic Shock)
  • Antibiotics: Effective for the treatment of bacterial infections, antibiotics do not affect the course of uncomplicated common colds (a viral infection) and are of no benefit for noninfectious rhinitis, including allergic rhinitis.
  • Selsun Blue Balanced Treatment — Medication
  • Self-Esteem, Ages 6 to 10
  • Secura Antifungal — Medication
  • Seconal Sodium — Medication
  • Itchy skin, hives and eczema
  • SenoSol-SS — Medication
  • Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
  • selenium sulfide topical — Medication
  • Secura Protective Cream — Medication
  • Seasonique — Medication
  • SenoSol-SS — Medication
  • Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  • semaglutide — Medication
  • Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  • Senexon — Medication
  • Senokot Additional — Medication
  • secnidazole — Medication
  • secnidazole — Medication
  • sevelamer — Medication
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
  • Sexual and Reproductive Organs
  • Serevent Diskus — Medication
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  • Senna Lax — Medication
  • Secondary Adrenocortical Insufficiency
  • secnidazole — Medication
  • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
  • Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  • sevelamer — Medication
  • Senior Health
  • SelRx — Medication
  • Senna-gen — Medication
  • Semen Analysis — Medical Test
  • SelRx — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
  • Seconal Sodium — Medication
  • Semprex-D — Medication
  • Self-Care for AIDS Caregivers
  • Self-Care for AIDS Caregivers
  • Seizures
  • selegiline (oral) — Medication
  • Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) — Medical Test
  • Self-Care for Sjögren’s Syndrome
  • Senna S — Medication
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Genital Exam for Men
  • Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  • selegiline (transdermal) — Medication
  • Seizure Medicine Levels in Blood — Medical Test
  • Self-Massage
  • Severity of Back Injuries
  • Separation Protests: Helping Your Child
  • selenium sulfide topical — Medication
  • Sepsis (Septic Shock)
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Health Professional Information [NCI]
  • Sexual and Reproductive Organs
  • Setting Goals
  • Sectral — Medication
  • Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  • Self-Test for Anxiety
  • Septocaine — Medication
  • Semprex-D — Medication
  • Seebri Neohaler — Medication
  • Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
  • Semen Analysis — Medical Test
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months
  • Severity of Back Injuries
  • Self-Test for Anxiety
  • sevelamer — Medication
  • Sex During Pregnancy
  • Senna Smooth — Medication
  • Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  • Separation Protests: Helping Your Child
  • Secondary High Blood Pressure
  • sebelipase alfa — Medication
  • Setting Goals
  • Secondary High Blood Pressure
  • selegiline (transdermal) — Medication
  • sebelipase alfa — Medication
  • Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  • Sectral — Medication
  • Sepsis (Septic Shock)
  • Septocaine — Medication
  • Senna — Medication
  • Self-Care Supplies
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing
  • Sexual Health
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections
  • SEROquel XR — Medication
  • Seromycin — Medication
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Patient Information [NCI]
  • Sexual and Reproductive Organs
  • Serevent Diskus — Medication
  • SenokotXTRA — Medication
  • Selenium TR — Medication
  • Sensipar — Medication
  • Septocaine — Medication
  • senna — Medication
  • Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
  • Senokot Additional — Medication
  • Nasal surgery: Surgery is not a treatment for allergic rhinitis, but it may assist if patients own nasal polyps or chronic sinusitis that is not responsive to antibiotics or nasal steroid sprays.
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing
  • Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy.

    Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.

  • Self-Care Supplies
  • Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  • Sex During Pregnancy
  • Self-Examination for Dental Plaque — Medical Test
  • Senna — Medication
  • Self-Care for AIDS Caregivers
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 12 to 24 Months
  • Self-Massage
  • Sensory Processing Disorder
  • Sernivo — Medication
  • Seasonique — Medication
  • SenoSol — Medication
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Health Professional Information [NCI]
  • Seizure Medicine Levels in Blood — Medical Test
  • Seb-Prev — Medication
  • Sexual Abuse or Assault (Rape)
  • If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible.

    If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.

  • Sexual Problems in Women
  • Sexual Health
  • Sexual Abuse: Signs and Symptoms
  • Sensipar — Medication
  • SEROquel — Medication
  • Seniortopix Healix — Medication
  • Seizures
  • Selenium TR — Medication
  • Sexual Problems in Women
  • To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often.

    If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.

  • Seb-Prev — Medication
  • Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily. Treatment can continue for as endless as three years. Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
  • Sectral — Medication
  • Seabather’s Eruption
  • Sensory and Motor Growth in Newborns
  • Self-Care Supplies
  • Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.
  • Senior Health
  • Sennalax-S — Medication
  • Seebri Neohaler — Medication
  • Sedimentation Rate (Sed Rate) — Medical Test
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Genital Exam for Men
  • Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Seb-Prev — Medication
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Health Professional Information [NCI]
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months
  • Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) — Medical Test
  • Self-Massage
  • Senokot S — Medication
  • sertaconazole topical — Medication
  • selenium — Medication
  • Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB): What You Need to Know
  • Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  • Selzentry — Medication
  • selegiline (transdermal) — Medication
  • selenium — Medication
  • Sedimentation Rate (Sed Rate) — Medical Test
  • Senokot — Medication
  • SenoSol-X — Medication
  • Senokot To Go — Medication
  • Senokot — Medication
  • Sensipar — Medication
  • Sensorcaine — Medication
  • Seniortopix Healix — Medication
  • Serax — Medication
  • Seizures
  • Self-Test for Breath Alcohol — Medical Test
  • sertraline — Medication
  • Self-Test for Anxiety
  • Seminoma Testicular Cancer, Stage I, Deciding About Treatment
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 12 to 24 Months
  • Secura Antifungal — Medication
  • Sennalax-S — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
  • Sedimentation Rate (Sed Rate) — Medical Test
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Patient Information [NCI]
  • Septra I.V.

    — Medication

  • sertraline — Medication
  • Serum Osmolality — Medical Test
  • Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB): What You Need to Know
  • Senokot S — Medication
  • Self-Care for Sjögren’s Syndrome
  • Serevent Diskus — Medication
  • Sensorcaine — Medication
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  • Septra I.V. — Medication
  • Sexual Abuse: Signs and Symptoms
  • Senior Health
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Patient Information [NCI]
  • Sex and Your Heart
  • Self-Esteem, Ages 6 to 10
  • Second-Trimester Exams and Tests
  • Serostim — Medication
  • selexipag — Medication
  • Serotonin Syndrome
  • Senna — Medication
  • secobarbital — Medication
  • Semen Analysis — Medical Test
  • Sensory and Motor Development From Age 6 to 10 Years
  • Sex During Pregnancy
  • Self-Care for Sjögren’s Syndrome
  • Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
  • Sensual Exercises for Erection Problems
  • Senexon — Medication
  • Sexual Problems in Women
  • Sexuality While Breastfeeding
  • Senna Plus — Medication
  • Secura Protective Cream — Medication
  • Sennalax-S — Medication
  • Segluromet — Medication
  • Segluromet — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Treatment
  • Senokot To Go — Medication
  • Senokot — Medication
  • Senna-gen — Medication
  • Sensorcaine — Medication
  • Self-Test for Breath Alcohol — Medical Test
  • Secura Protective Cream — Medication
  • SenoSol-X — Medication
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 12 to 24 Months
  • Semprex-D — Medication
  • Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  • Senna Plus — Medication
  • Senna Smooth — Medication
  • SenokotXTRA — Medication
  • Seniortopix Healix — Medication
  • Self-Examination for Dental Plaque — Medical Test
  • Sensory and Motor Growth in Newborns
  • Sensual Exercises for Erection Problems
  • Self-Care After a Stroke
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  • Serax — Medication
  • SelRx — Medication
  • Sensory Processing Disorder
  • Seizure Medicine Levels in Blood — Medical Test
  • selegiline (oral) — Medication
  • Sex After Childbirth
  • Sensory and Motor Growth in Newborns
  • Serax — Medication
  • Secondary Adrenocortical Insufficiency
  • Self-Examination for Dental Plaque — Medical Test
  • Seasonale — Medication
  • sebelipase alfa — Medication
  • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
  • secukinumab — Medication
  • Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached.

    Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections. Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish.

    What is safe to take for allergies when pregnant

    As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  • Senna Plus — Medication
  • senna — Medication
  • Serotonin Syndrome
  • Sexual Abuse: Signs and Symptoms
  • Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  • Sernivo — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections
  • Sex After Childbirth
  • Sensory and Motor Development From Age 6 to 10 Years
  • Self-Test for Breath Alcohol — Medical Test
  • Seabather’s Eruption
  • Seminoma Testicular Cancer, Stage I, Deciding About Treatment
  • Seasonale — Medication
  • Selzentry — Medication
  • Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.
  • Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling.

    Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.

  • Senna Lax — Medication
  • Seborrheic Keratoses
  • Never take anyone else’s medication.
  • Sensual Exercises for Erection Problems
  • Self-Care After a Stroke
  • Seborrheic Keratoses
  • Serum Osmolality — Medical Test
  • Selzentry — Medication
  • Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing
  • Secondary High Blood Pressure
  • selexipag — Medication
  • SenoSol-SS — Medication
  • Senna-gen — Medication
  • SenokotXTRA — Medication
  • Senokot Additional — Medication
  • Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home.

    Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.

  • Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  • semaglutide — Medication
  • Senna S — Medication
  • Sexuality and Physical Changes With Aging
  • sertaconazole topical — Medication
  • Sex and Your Heart
  • selexipag — Medication
  • secukinumab — Medication
  • Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  • Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
  • Seebri Neohaler — Medication
  • secobarbital — Medication
  • Sex After Childbirth
  • Selenium TR — Medication
  • Sexual Abuse or Assault (Rape)
  • Self-Esteem, Ages 6 to 10
  • Second-Trimester Exams and Tests
  • Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) — Medical Test
  • selenium — Medication
  • Sensory and Motor Development From Age 6 to 10 Years
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Treatment

◇Precaution◇

<Precautions>
■When not to use the product
1.

This drug should not be taken together with the following drugs:
Other internal medicine for rhinitis, internal medicine containing antihistamines (including freezing medicine, expectorant, medicine for motion sickness, medicine for allergies), indigestion and heartburn relief.
2. After taking this drug, do not drive a car or operate machinery (symptoms such as sleepiness, blurred vision and abnormal brightness may occur).
3. Do not take this medicine for a endless time

■Consultation
1.

The following persons should contact a physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation before istration.
(1) Patients undergoing medical treatment from a physician.
(2) Pregnant women or women suspected of being pregnant.
(3) The elderly
(4) Patients who own experienced allergic symptoms associated with drugs, etc.
(5) Persons with the following symptoms:
Hyperthermia, urination difficulty
(6) Persons diagnosed as having the following:
Glaucoma, diabetes, thyroid disease, heart disease, hypertension
2. If the following symptoms are observed after taking this drug, these may be adverse reactions, so immediately discontinue the use of this drug, and show this document to your physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation.
Skin:rash/redness, itching
Gastrointestinal system:nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite
Neuropsychiatric system: headache
Urinary system:urination difficulty
Other:facial boiling flashes, abnormal brightness

The following serious symptoms may happen in rare cases.

In such cases, immediately seek medical aid:
Aplastic anemia: Symptoms, such as bruises, nose bleeds, bleeding gums, fever, pale appearance of skin and mucosa, fatigue, palpitations, shortness of breath, becoming dizzy from feeling ill and blood in the urine, etc. may occur.
Agranulocytosis: Symptoms, such as acute high fever, chills and sore throat, etc. may occur.
3. The following symptoms may be observed after taking this drug. If these symptoms persist or worsen, discontinue the use of this drug, and show this document to your physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation.
dry mouth, sleepiness, constipation, blurred vision
4.When symptoms do not improve even after taking the medicine 5 to 6 times, stop taking this medicine and consult a physician, pharmacist or registered salesperson, being certain to take this instruction leaflet with you.

<Precautions of Dosage and istration>
(1) Strictly follow the prescribed dosage and istration.
(2) How to take the tablets out:
Press hard the protrusion of PTP sheet containing the tablets on the fingertips to break aluminum foil on the back. Then take the capsules and ingest.

<Precautions for storage and handling>
(1) Store in a cool, low humidity put away from direct sunlight.
(2) Hold out of reach of children.
(3) Do not transfer the medicine to a diverse container.
(4) Do not take the product after its expiration date.

◇Disclaimer on Multilingual OTC Product Information◇

・This product is a pharmaceutical product approved under a Japanese law, the Law for Ensuring the Quality, Efficacy and Safety of Drugs and Medical Devices, with a view to its sale and use in Japan.
・Multilingual product information is a translation of the product labeling written in Japanese and provided for your information only. It does not warrant that its contents and the product itself conforms to laws and regulations in countries other than Japan.
・Multilingual product information is a tentative translation by Our Company, and may be modified or altered without notice.
・Our Company assumes no responsibility for any occurred problem attributable to the contents of the multilingual product information.

Avoidance

The first approach in managing seasonal or perennial forms of hay fever should be to avoid the allergens that trigger symptoms.

Outdoor exposure

  1. Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  2. Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  3. Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  4. Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  5. Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  6. Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.

Indoor exposure

  1. Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home.

    Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.

  2. To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often. If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.
  3. Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom. Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs.

    What is safe to take for allergies when pregnant

    Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least degrees Fahrenheit).

  4. Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.

Exposure to pets

  1. Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  2. If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible. If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.
  3. Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling.

    Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.

◇Dosage and istration◇

Take the following quantity of medicine.
Adults (15 years or over): 1 tablet per dose
Under 15 years: Do not take.
Number of doses per day: 1〜2 times

Medications

Many allergens that trigger allergic rhinitis are airborne, so you can’t always avoid them. If your symptoms can’t be well-controlled by simply avoiding triggers, your allergist may recommend medications that reduce nasal congestion, sneezing, and an itchy and runny nose.

They are available in numerous forms — oral tablets, liquid medication, nasal sprays and eyedrops. Some medications may own side effects, so discuss these treatments with your allergist so they can assist you live the life you want.

Intranasal corticosteroids

Intranasal corticosteroids are the single most effective drug class for treating allergic rhinitis. They can significantly reduce nasal congestion as well as sneezing, itching and a runny nose.

Ask your allergist about whether these medications are appropriate and safe for you.

These sprays are designed to avoid the side effects that may happen from steroids that are taken by mouth or injection. Take care not to spray the medication against the middle portion of the nose (the nasal septum). The most common side effects are local irritation and nasal bleeding. Some older preparations own been shown to own some effect on children’s growth; data about some newer steroids don’t indicate an effect on growth.

Leukatriene pathway inhibitors

Leukotriene pathway inhibitors (montelukast, zafirlukast and zileuton) block the action of leukotriene, a substance in the body that can cause symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

These drugs are also used to treat asthma.

Decongestants

Decongestants assist relieve the stuffiness and pressure caused by swollen nasal tissue. They do not contain antihistamines, so they do not cause antihistaminic side effects. They do not relieve other symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Oral decongestants are available as prescription and nonprescription medications and are often found in combination with antihistamines or other medications. It is not unusual for patients using decongestants to experience insomnia if they take the medication in the afternoon or evening.

If this occurs, a dose reduction may be needed. At times, men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on decongestants. Patients using medications to manage emotional or behavioral problems should discuss this with their allergist before using decongestants. Patients with high blood pressure or heart disease should check with their allergist before using. Pregnant patients should also check with their allergist before starting decongestants.

Nonprescription decongestant nasal sprays work within minutes and final for hours, but you should not use them for more than a few days at a time unless instructed by your allergist.

Prolonged use can cause rhinitis medicamentosa, or rebound swelling of the nasal tissue. Stopping the use of the decongestant nasal spray will cure that swelling, provided that there is no underlying disorder.

Oral decongestants are found in numerous over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications, and may be the treatment of choice for nasal congestion. They don’t cause rhinitis medicamentosa but need to be avoided by some patients with high blood pressure. If you own high blood pressure or heart problems, check with your allergist before using them.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy may be recommended for people who don’t reply well to treatment with medications or who experience side effects from medications, who own allergen exposure that is unavoidable or who desire a more permanent solution to their allergies.

Immunotherapy can be extremely effective in controlling allergic symptoms, but it doesn’t assist the symptoms produced by nonallergic rhinitis.

Two types of immunotherapy are available: allergy shots and sublingual (under-the-tongue) tablets.

  1. Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached.

    Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections. Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish. As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  2. Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily. Treatment can continue for as endless as three years.

    Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.

Nasal sprays

Nonprescription saline nasal sprays will assist counteract symptoms such as dry nasal passages or thick nasal mucus. Unlike decongestant nasal sprays, a saline nasal spray can be used as often as it is needed. Sometimes an allergist may recommend washing (douching) the nasal passage. There are numerous OTC delivery systems for saline rinses, including neti pots and saline rinse bottles.

Nasal cromolyn blocks the body’s release of allergy-causing substances.

It does not work in every patients. The full dose is four times daily, and improvement of symptoms may take several weeks. Nasal cromolyn can assist prevent allergic nasal reactions if taken prior to an allergen exposure.

Nasal ipratropium bromide spray can assist reduce nasal drainage from allergic rhinitis or some forms of nonallergic rhinitis.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic rhinitis. These medications counter the effects of histamine, the irritating chemical released within your body when an allergic reaction takes put.

Although other chemicals are involved, histamine is primarily responsible for causing the symptoms. Antihistamines are found in eyedrops, nasal sprays and, most commonly, oral tablets and syrup.

Antihistamines assist to relieve nasal allergy symptoms such as:

  1. Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  2. Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  3. Itchy skin, hives and eczema

There are dozens of antihistamines; some are available over the counter, while others require a prescription.

Patients reply to them in a wide variety of ways.

Generally, the newer (second-generation) products work well and produce only minor side effects. Some people discover that an antihistamine becomes less effective as the allergy season worsens or as their allergies change over time. If you discover that an antihistamine is becoming less effective, tell your allergist, who may recommend a diverse type or strength of antihistamine. If you own excessive nasal dryness or thick nasal mucus, consult an allergist before taking antihistamines.

Contact your allergist for advice if an antihistamine causes drowsiness or other side effects.

Proper use: Short-acting antihistamines can be taken every four to six hours, while timed-release antihistamines are taken every 12 to 24 hours. The short-acting antihistamines are often most helpful if taken 30 minutes before an anticipated exposure to an allergen (such as at a picnic during ragweed season). Timed-release antihistamines are better suited to long-term use for those who need daily medications. Proper use of these drugs is just as significant as their selection. The most effective way to use them is before symptoms develop.

A dose taken early can eliminate the need for numerous later doses to reduce established symptoms. Numerous times a patient will tell that he or she “took one, and it didn’t work.” If the patient had taken the antihistamine regularly for three to four days to build up blood levels of the medication, it might own been effective.

Side effects: Older (first-generation) antihistamines may cause drowsiness or performance impairment, which can lead to accidents and personal injury. Even when these medications are taken only at bedtime, they can still cause considerable impairment the following day, even in people who do not feel drowsy.

For this reason, it is significant that you do not drive a car or work with dangerous machinery when you take a potentially sedating antihistamine. Some of the newer antihistamines do not cause drowsiness.

A frequent side effect is excessive dryness of the mouth, nose and eyes.

What is safe to take for allergies when pregnant

Less common side effects include restlessness, nervousness, overexcitability, insomnia, dizziness, headaches, euphoria, fainting, visual disturbances, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distress, constipation, diarrhea, increased or decreased urination, urinary retention, high or low blood pressure, nightmares (especially in children), sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, chest tightness or palpitations. Men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on antihistamines. Consult your allergist if these reactions occur.

Important precautions:

  1. Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  2. Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy.

    Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.

  3. Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  4. Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  5. Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  6. While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  7. Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  8. Never take anyone else’s medication.

Eye allergy preparations and eyedrops

Eye allergy preparations may be helpful when the eyes are affected by the same allergens that trigger rhinitis, causing redness, swelling, watery eyes and itching.

OTC eyedrops and oral medications are commonly used for short-term relief of some eye allergy symptoms. They may not relieve every symptoms, though, and prolonged use of some of these drops may actually cause your condition to worsen.

Prescription eyedrops and oral medications also are used to treat eye allergies. Prescription eyedrops provide both short- and long-term targeted relief of eye allergy symptoms, and can be used to manage them.

Check with your allergist or pharmacist if you are unsure about a specific drug or formula.

◇Ingredient and amount◇

In 2 tablets
[The inner core]
Chlorpheniramine maleate 6mg
Phenylephrine Hydrochloride 6mg
Datura Extract 12mg
[The outer shell]
Chlorpheniramine maleate 6mg
Phenylephrine Hydrochloride 6mg
Datura Extract 12mg

◇Indication◇

Relief of the following symptoms due to acute or allergic rhinitis; sneezing, runny nose, stuffy nose, watery eyes, heaviness in the head

Treatments that are not recommended for allergic rhinitis

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  24. selexipag — Medication
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  41. selegiline (oral) — Medication
  42. Secura Protective Cream — Medication
  43. Senna — Medication
  44. Seborrheic Keratoses
  45. Seromycin — Medication
  46. Severity of Back Injuries
  47. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
  48. Sexual Orientation
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  50. Semen Analysis — Medical Test
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  55. Sectral — Medication
  56. Senna Lax — Medication
  57. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Treatment
  58. SelRx — Medication
  59. Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  60. Sexual and Reproductive Organs
  61. Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 12 to 24 Months
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  63. Sex During Pregnancy
  64. sebelipase alfa — Medication
  65. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
  66. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
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  72. Sepsis (Septic Shock)
  73. Senna Plus — Medication
  74. Seconal Sodium — Medication
  75. Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  76. Semprex-D — Medication
  77. selegiline (oral) — Medication
  78. Self-Care for AIDS Caregivers
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  80. Sensorcaine — Medication
  81. Separation Protests: Helping Your Child
  82. Senna S — Medication
  83. selexipag — Medication
  84. Separation Protests: Helping Your Child
  85. Severity of Back Injuries
  86. Semprex-D — Medication
  87. Senokot Additional — Medication
  88. Senokot Additional — Medication
  89. Self-Examination for Dental Plaque — Medical Test
  90. Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
  91. Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  92. Seasonique — Medication
  93. Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  94. Senior Health
  95. Sensory and Motor Development From Age 6 to 10 Years
  96. Serostim — Medication
  97. selegiline (transdermal) — Medication
  98. semaglutide — Medication
  99. Seabather’s Eruption
  100. Sexually Transmitted Infections
  101. Seasonale — Medication
  102. secobarbital — Medication
  103. sebelipase alfa — Medication
  104. Seizures
  105. Secura Antifungal — Medication
  106. Sedimentation Rate (Sed Rate) — Medical Test
  107. Self-Esteem, Ages 6 to 10
  108. Secondary High Blood Pressure
  109. Semen Analysis — Medical Test
  110. Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB): What You Need to Know
  111. Seebri Neohaler — Medication
  112. Senokot To Go — Medication
  113. Serevent Diskus — Medication
  114. senna — Medication
  115. Secondary High Blood Pressure
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  117. Seconal Sodium — Medication
  118. Segluromet — Medication
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  120. SelRx — Medication
  121. Secura Protective Cream — Medication
  122. Secondary Adrenocortical Insufficiency
  123. Secondary Adrenocortical Insufficiency
  124. Sensipar — Medication
  125. sevelamer — Medication
  126. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Genital Exam for Men
  127. Sensory Processing Disorder
  128. Sex After Childbirth
  129. Selsun Blue Balanced Treatment — Medication
  130. Seizure Medicine Levels in Blood — Medical Test
  131. secobarbital — Medication
  132. Sexual Abuse: Signs and Symptoms
  133. Senexon — Medication
  134. SenoSol-SS — Medication
  135. Sennalax-S — Medication
  136. Sensual Exercises for Erection Problems
  137. Senna Smooth — Medication
  138. Seborrheic Keratoses
  139. Senokot To Go — Medication
  140. Sensorcaine — Medication
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  144. Septra I.V.

    — Medication

  145. Seasonale — Medication
  146. Self-Care After a Stroke
  147. Self-Massage
  148. Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months
  149. Senior Health
  150. Self-Test for Breath Alcohol — Medical Test
  151. Serax — Medication
  152. Sexual and Reproductive Organs
  153. Seizure Medicine Levels in Blood — Medical Test
  154. SenokotXTRA — Medication
  155. Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) — Medical Test
  156. Sexuality While Breastfeeding
  157. Sex During Pregnancy
  158. semaglutide — Medication
  159. SenoSol — Medication
  160. Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing
  161. Self-Test for Anxiety
  162. Self-Care After a Stroke
  163. Serum Osmolality — Medical Test
  164. Sennalax-S — Medication
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  166. Self-Test for Breath Alcohol — Medical Test
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  168. secnidazole — Medication
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  171. Septocaine — Medication
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  178. Selenium TR — Medication
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  184. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
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  186. sevelamer — Medication
  187. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
  188. SenoSol-X — Medication
  189. Self-Massage
  190. Senna Smooth — Medication
  191. Self-Care Supplies
  192. SEROquel XR — Medication
  193. Sex After Childbirth
  194. Seizures
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  196. SEROquel — Medication
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◇Precaution◇

<Precautions>
■When not to use the product
1.

This drug should not be taken together with the following drugs:
Other internal medicine for rhinitis, internal medicine containing antihistamines (including freezing medicine, expectorant, medicine for motion sickness, medicine for allergies), indigestion and heartburn relief.
2. After taking this drug, do not drive a car or operate machinery (symptoms such as sleepiness, blurred vision and abnormal brightness may occur).
3. Do not take this medicine for a endless time

■Consultation
1. The following persons should contact a physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation before istration.
(1) Patients undergoing medical treatment from a physician.
(2) Pregnant women or women suspected of being pregnant.
(3) The elderly
(4) Patients who own experienced allergic symptoms associated with drugs, etc.
(5) Persons with the following symptoms:
Hyperthermia, urination difficulty
(6) Persons diagnosed as having the following:
Glaucoma, diabetes, thyroid disease, heart disease, hypertension
2.

If the following symptoms are observed after taking this drug, these may be adverse reactions, so immediately discontinue the use of this drug, and show this document to your physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation.
Skin:rash/redness, itching
Gastrointestinal system:nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite
Neuropsychiatric system: headache
Urinary system:urination difficulty
Other:facial boiling flashes, abnormal brightness

The following serious symptoms may happen in rare cases.

In such cases, immediately seek medical aid:
Aplastic anemia: Symptoms, such as bruises, nose bleeds, bleeding gums, fever, pale appearance of skin and mucosa, fatigue, palpitations, shortness of breath, becoming dizzy from feeling ill and blood in the urine, etc. may occur.
Agranulocytosis: Symptoms, such as acute high fever, chills and sore throat, etc. may occur.
3. The following symptoms may be observed after taking this drug.

If these symptoms persist or worsen, discontinue the use of this drug, and show this document to your physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation.
dry mouth, sleepiness, constipation, blurred vision
4.When symptoms do not improve even after taking the medicine 5 to 6 times, stop taking this medicine and consult a physician, pharmacist or registered salesperson, being certain to take this instruction leaflet with you.

<Precautions of Dosage and istration>
(1) Strictly follow the prescribed dosage and istration.
(2) How to take the tablets out:
Press hard the protrusion of PTP sheet containing the tablets on the fingertips to break aluminum foil on the back.

Then take the capsules and ingest.

<Precautions for storage and handling>
(1) Store in a cool, low humidity put away from direct sunlight.
(2) Hold out of reach of children.
(3) Do not transfer the medicine to a diverse container.
(4) Do not take the product after its expiration date.

◇Disclaimer on Multilingual OTC Product Information◇

・This product is a pharmaceutical product approved under a Japanese law, the Law for Ensuring the Quality, Efficacy and Safety of Drugs and Medical Devices, with a view to its sale and use in Japan.
・Multilingual product information is a translation of the product labeling written in Japanese and provided for your information only.

It does not warrant that its contents and the product itself conforms to laws and regulations in countries other than Japan.
・Multilingual product information is a tentative translation by Our Company, and may be modified or altered without notice.
・Our Company assumes no responsibility for any occurred problem attributable to the contents of the multilingual product information.

Avoidance

The first approach in managing seasonal or perennial forms of hay fever should be to avoid the allergens that trigger symptoms.

Outdoor exposure

  1. Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  2. Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  3. Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  4. Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  5. Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  6. Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.

Indoor exposure

  1. Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home.

    Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.

  2. To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often. If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.
  3. Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom. Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs. Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least degrees Fahrenheit).
  4. Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.

Exposure to pets

  1. Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  2. If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible.

    If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.

  3. Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling. Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.

◇Dosage and istration◇

Take the following quantity of medicine.
Adults (15 years or over): 1 tablet per dose
Under 15 years: Do not take.
Number of doses per day: 1〜2 times

Medications

Many allergens that trigger allergic rhinitis are airborne, so you can’t always avoid them.

If your symptoms can’t be well-controlled by simply avoiding triggers, your allergist may recommend medications that reduce nasal congestion, sneezing, and an itchy and runny nose. They are available in numerous forms — oral tablets, liquid medication, nasal sprays and eyedrops. Some medications may own side effects, so discuss these treatments with your allergist so they can assist you live the life you want.

Intranasal corticosteroids

Intranasal corticosteroids are the single most effective drug class for treating allergic rhinitis.

They can significantly reduce nasal congestion as well as sneezing, itching and a runny nose.

Ask your allergist about whether these medications are appropriate and safe for you. These sprays are designed to avoid the side effects that may happen from steroids that are taken by mouth or injection. Take care not to spray the medication against the middle portion of the nose (the nasal septum). The most common side effects are local irritation and nasal bleeding. Some older preparations own been shown to own some effect on children’s growth; data about some newer steroids don’t indicate an effect on growth.

Leukatriene pathway inhibitors

Leukotriene pathway inhibitors (montelukast, zafirlukast and zileuton) block the action of leukotriene, a substance in the body that can cause symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

These drugs are also used to treat asthma.

Decongestants

Decongestants assist relieve the stuffiness and pressure caused by swollen nasal tissue. They do not contain antihistamines, so they do not cause antihistaminic side effects. They do not relieve other symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Oral decongestants are available as prescription and nonprescription medications and are often found in combination with antihistamines or other medications. It is not unusual for patients using decongestants to experience insomnia if they take the medication in the afternoon or evening. If this occurs, a dose reduction may be needed.

At times, men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on decongestants. Patients using medications to manage emotional or behavioral problems should discuss this with their allergist before using decongestants. Patients with high blood pressure or heart disease should check with their allergist before using. Pregnant patients should also check with their allergist before starting decongestants.

Nonprescription decongestant nasal sprays work within minutes and final for hours, but you should not use them for more than a few days at a time unless instructed by your allergist.

Prolonged use can cause rhinitis medicamentosa, or rebound swelling of the nasal tissue. Stopping the use of the decongestant nasal spray will cure that swelling, provided that there is no underlying disorder.

Oral decongestants are found in numerous over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications, and may be the treatment of choice for nasal congestion. They don’t cause rhinitis medicamentosa but need to be avoided by some patients with high blood pressure. If you own high blood pressure or heart problems, check with your allergist before using them.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy may be recommended for people who don’t reply well to treatment with medications or who experience side effects from medications, who own allergen exposure that is unavoidable or who desire a more permanent solution to their allergies.

Immunotherapy can be extremely effective in controlling allergic symptoms, but it doesn’t assist the symptoms produced by nonallergic rhinitis.

Two types of immunotherapy are available: allergy shots and sublingual (under-the-tongue) tablets.

  1. Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached. Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections.

    Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish. As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  2. Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily. Treatment can continue for as endless as three years. Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.

Nasal sprays

Nonprescription saline nasal sprays will assist counteract symptoms such as dry nasal passages or thick nasal mucus.

Unlike decongestant nasal sprays, a saline nasal spray can be used as often as it is needed. Sometimes an allergist may recommend washing (douching) the nasal passage. There are numerous OTC delivery systems for saline rinses, including neti pots and saline rinse bottles.

Nasal cromolyn blocks the body’s release of allergy-causing substances. It does not work in every patients. The full dose is four times daily, and improvement of symptoms may take several weeks. Nasal cromolyn can assist prevent allergic nasal reactions if taken prior to an allergen exposure.

Nasal ipratropium bromide spray can assist reduce nasal drainage from allergic rhinitis or some forms of nonallergic rhinitis.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic rhinitis.

These medications counter the effects of histamine, the irritating chemical released within your body when an allergic reaction takes put. Although other chemicals are involved, histamine is primarily responsible for causing the symptoms. Antihistamines are found in eyedrops, nasal sprays and, most commonly, oral tablets and syrup.

Antihistamines assist to relieve nasal allergy symptoms such as:

  1. Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  2. Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  3. Itchy skin, hives and eczema

There are dozens of antihistamines; some are available over the counter, while others require a prescription.

Patients reply to them in a wide variety of ways.

Generally, the newer (second-generation) products work well and produce only minor side effects. Some people discover that an antihistamine becomes less effective as the allergy season worsens or as their allergies change over time. If you discover that an antihistamine is becoming less effective, tell your allergist, who may recommend a diverse type or strength of antihistamine.

What is safe to take for allergies when pregnant

If you own excessive nasal dryness or thick nasal mucus, consult an allergist before taking antihistamines. Contact your allergist for advice if an antihistamine causes drowsiness or other side effects.

Proper use: Short-acting antihistamines can be taken every four to six hours, while timed-release antihistamines are taken every 12 to 24 hours. The short-acting antihistamines are often most helpful if taken 30 minutes before an anticipated exposure to an allergen (such as at a picnic during ragweed season).

Timed-release antihistamines are better suited to long-term use for those who need daily medications. Proper use of these drugs is just as significant as their selection. The most effective way to use them is before symptoms develop. A dose taken early can eliminate the need for numerous later doses to reduce established symptoms. Numerous times a patient will tell that he or she “took one, and it didn’t work.” If the patient had taken the antihistamine regularly for three to four days to build up blood levels of the medication, it might own been effective.

Side effects: Older (first-generation) antihistamines may cause drowsiness or performance impairment, which can lead to accidents and personal injury.

Even when these medications are taken only at bedtime, they can still cause considerable impairment the following day, even in people who do not feel drowsy. For this reason, it is significant that you do not drive a car or work with dangerous machinery when you take a potentially sedating antihistamine. Some of the newer antihistamines do not cause drowsiness.

A frequent side effect is excessive dryness of the mouth, nose and eyes. Less common side effects include restlessness, nervousness, overexcitability, insomnia, dizziness, headaches, euphoria, fainting, visual disturbances, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distress, constipation, diarrhea, increased or decreased urination, urinary retention, high or low blood pressure, nightmares (especially in children), sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, chest tightness or palpitations.

Men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on antihistamines. Consult your allergist if these reactions occur.

Important precautions:

  1. Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  2. Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy. Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.
  3. Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  4. Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  5. Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  6. While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  7. Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  8. Never take anyone else’s medication.

Eye allergy preparations and eyedrops

Eye allergy preparations may be helpful when the eyes are affected by the same allergens that trigger rhinitis, causing redness, swelling, watery eyes and itching.

OTC eyedrops and oral medications are commonly used for short-term relief of some eye allergy symptoms. They may not relieve every symptoms, though, and prolonged use of some of these drops may actually cause your condition to worsen.

Prescription eyedrops and oral medications also are used to treat eye allergies. Prescription eyedrops provide both short- and long-term targeted relief of eye allergy symptoms, and can be used to manage them.

Check with your allergist or pharmacist if you are unsure about a specific drug or formula.

◇Ingredient and amount◇

In 2 tablets
[The inner core]
Chlorpheniramine maleate 6mg
Phenylephrine Hydrochloride 6mg
Datura Extract 12mg
[The outer shell]
Chlorpheniramine maleate 6mg
Phenylephrine Hydrochloride 6mg
Datura Extract 12mg

◇Indication◇

Relief of the following symptoms due to acute or allergic rhinitis; sneezing, runny nose, stuffy nose, watery eyes, heaviness in the head

Treatments that are not recommended for allergic rhinitis

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  12. Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) — Medical Test
  13. Nasal surgery: Surgery is not a treatment for allergic rhinitis, but it may assist if patients own nasal polyps or chronic sinusitis that is not responsive to antibiotics or nasal steroid sprays.
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  44. Seborrheic Keratoses
  45. Seromycin — Medication
  46. Severity of Back Injuries
  47. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
  48. Sexual Orientation
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  50. Semen Analysis — Medical Test
  51. Sexual Orientation
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  55. Sectral — Medication
  56. Senna Lax — Medication
  57. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Treatment
  58. SelRx — Medication
  59. Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  60. Sexual and Reproductive Organs
  61. Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 12 to 24 Months
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  63. Sex During Pregnancy
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  65. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
  66. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
  67. Sernivo — Medication
  68. Senokot — Medication
  69. Serostim — Medication
  70. Sensory Processing Disorder
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  72. Sepsis (Septic Shock)
  73. Senna Plus — Medication
  74. Seconal Sodium — Medication
  75. Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  76. Semprex-D — Medication
  77. selegiline (oral) — Medication
  78. Self-Care for AIDS Caregivers
  79. Senna-gen — Medication
  80. Sensorcaine — Medication
  81. Separation Protests: Helping Your Child
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  83. selexipag — Medication
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  86. Semprex-D — Medication
  87. Senokot Additional — Medication
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  89. Self-Examination for Dental Plaque — Medical Test
  90. Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
  91. Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  92. Seasonique — Medication
  93. Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  94. Senior Health
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  98. semaglutide — Medication
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  100. Sexually Transmitted Infections
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  102. secobarbital — Medication
  103. sebelipase alfa — Medication
  104. Seizures
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  107. Self-Esteem, Ages 6 to 10
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  137. Senna Smooth — Medication
  138. Seborrheic Keratoses
  139. Senokot To Go — Medication
  140. Sensorcaine — Medication
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  142. Selsun Blue Balanced Treatment — Medication
  143. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
  144. Septra I.V.

    — Medication

  145. Seasonale — Medication
  146. Self-Care After a Stroke
  147. Self-Massage
  148. Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months
  149. Senior Health
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  151. Serax — Medication
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  153. Seizure Medicine Levels in Blood — Medical Test
  154. SenokotXTRA — Medication
  155. Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) — Medical Test
  156. Sexuality While Breastfeeding
  157. Sex During Pregnancy
  158. semaglutide — Medication
  159. SenoSol — Medication
  160. Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing
  161. Self-Test for Anxiety
  162. Self-Care After a Stroke
  163. Serum Osmolality — Medical Test
  164. Sennalax-S — Medication
  165. Septocaine — Medication
  166. Self-Test for Breath Alcohol — Medical Test
  167. Secura Antifungal — Medication
  168. secnidazole — Medication
  169. Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB): What You Need to Know
  170. Sepsis (Septic Shock)
  171. Septocaine — Medication
  172. Setting Goals
  173. Sensual Exercises for Erection Problems
  174. Selzentry — Medication
  175. selenium — Medication
  176. Serax — Medication
  177. Sexual Problems in Women
  178. Selenium TR — Medication
  179. Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months
  180. Self-Care for Sjögren’s Syndrome
  181. Sexual Abuse or Assault (Rape)
  182. Antibiotics: Effective for the treatment of bacterial infections, antibiotics do not affect the course of uncomplicated common colds (a viral infection) and are of no benefit for noninfectious rhinitis, including allergic rhinitis.
  183. SEROquel — Medication
  184. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
  185. Sensory and Motor Development From Age 6 to 10 Years
  186. sevelamer — Medication
  187. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
  188. SenoSol-X — Medication
  189. Self-Massage
  190. Senna Smooth — Medication
  191. Self-Care Supplies
  192. SEROquel XR — Medication
  193. Sex After Childbirth
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  196. SEROquel — Medication
  197. Setting Goals
  198. Sensory and Motor Growth in Newborns
  199. Seabather’s Eruption
  200. Sernivo — Medication
  201. secnidazole — Medication
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  203. Sexual Problems in Women
  204. Sex and Your Heart
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  206. Septra I.V.

    — Medication

  207. Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
  208. SenoSol-X — Medication
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  210. Sedimentation Rate (Sed Rate) — Medical Test
  211. Sexual Abuse: Signs and Symptoms
  212. Senokot S — Medication
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  214. Sexuality While Breastfeeding
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  229. Senokot S — Medication
  230. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Treatment
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  • Secondary High Blood Pressure
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  • Self-Esteem, Ages 6 to 10
  • Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB): What You Need to Know
  • Sensory and Motor Growth in Newborns
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
  • Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  • Seniortopix Healix — Medication
  • Semen Analysis — Medical Test
  • Sedimentation Rate (Sed Rate) — Medical Test
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  • Sexual Abuse: Signs and Symptoms
  • Seabather’s Eruption
  • Self-Care for Sjögren’s Syndrome
  • Selenium TR — Medication
  • Self-Care for AIDS Caregivers
  • Sexual Abuse or Assault (Rape)
  • Sexuality While Breastfeeding
  • Sepsis (Septic Shock)
  • SenoSol-X — Medication
  • Self-Care After a Stroke
  • Severity of Back Injuries
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Patient Information [NCI]
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 12 to 24 Months
  • Seizures
  • Separation Protests: Helping Your Child
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  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months
  • Senna-gen — Medication
  • Sex and Your Heart
  • Sensual Exercises for Erection Problems
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  • Seasonale — Medication
  • selenium — Medication
  • Sex During Pregnancy
  • Senior Health
  • Serax — Medication
  • Senokot — Medication
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Health Professional Information [NCI]
  • Secondary Adrenocortical Insufficiency
  • Second-Trimester Exams and Tests
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  • Senna S — Medication
  • Senna Smooth — Medication
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  • Septocaine — Medication
  • Serotonin Syndrome
  • SenoSol — Medication
  • Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
  • Senokot Additional — Medication
  • Serevent Diskus — Medication
  • Sennalax-S — Medication
  • Sexuality and Physical Changes With Aging
  • Setting Goals
  • Seizure Medicine Levels in Blood — Medical Test
  • Sexual Problems in Women
  • Senokot S — Medication
  • Senna Lax — Medication
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  • Sex After Childbirth
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  • Self-Test for Anxiety
  • Serum Osmolality — Medical Test
  • SenokotXTRA — Medication
  • Self-Care Supplies
  • SEROquel — Medication
  • Senna Plus — Medication
  • Selsun Blue Balanced Treatment — Medication
  • Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
  • Sensorcaine — Medication
  • Seconal Sodium — Medication
  • Secura Antifungal — Medication
  • Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) — Medical Test
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  • Serostim — Medication
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  • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
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  • Septra I.V.

    — Medication

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  • Sensory and Motor Development From Age 6 to 10 Years
  • Senokot To Go — Medication
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  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  • Segluromet — Medication
  • Self-Examination for Dental Plaque — Medical Test
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  • Sensipar — Medication
  • Sensory Processing Disorder
  • Selzentry — Medication
  • SelRx — Medication
  • Senexon — Medication
  • Self-Massage
  • Seb-Prev — Medication
  • sertaconazole topical — Medication
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  • Senna — Medication
  • sertraline — Medication
  • Seborrheic Keratoses
  • Sectral — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Genital Exam for Men
  • selenium sulfide topical — Medication
  • secobarbital — Medication
  • Sexual Health
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Treatment
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  • Secura Antifungal — Medication
  • Sexual and Reproductive Organs
  • Semen Analysis — Medical Test
  • Sexual Abuse: Signs and Symptoms
  • sertraline — Medication
  • Never take anyone else’s medication.
  • If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible.

    If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.

  • SenokotXTRA — Medication
  • Senna Smooth — Medication
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Health Professional Information [NCI]
  • Self-Care for AIDS Caregivers
  • Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily. Treatment can continue for as endless as three years.

    Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.

  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
  • Selsun Blue Balanced Treatment — Medication
  • Self-Examination for Dental Plaque — Medical Test
  • SelRx — Medication
  • Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling. Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.
  • Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  • Sex After Childbirth
  • Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine (MenB): What You Need to Know
  • Self-Test for Breath Alcohol — Medical Test
  • Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home.

    Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.

  • selexipag — Medication
  • sertaconazole topical — Medication
  • selenium — Medication
  • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)
  • Seizures
  • Serotonin Syndrome
  • Sensory and Motor Growth in Newborns
  • Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom. Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs. Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least degrees Fahrenheit).
  • Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) — Medical Test
  • Senna S — Medication
  • Seasonique — Medication
  • Self-Care Supplies
  • Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  • Senokot S — Medication
  • Sex Therapy for Erection Problems
  • Sensual Exercises for Erection Problems
  • selenium sulfide topical — Medication
  • Secura Protective Cream — Medication
  • secukinumab — Medication
  • Sernivo — Medication
  • Self-Care for Sjögren’s Syndrome
  • Seb-Prev — Medication
  • Senna Plus — Medication
  • Senokot To Go — Medication
  • Senior Health
  • Sensipar — Medication
  • Sensory and Motor Development From Age 6 to 10 Years
  • Sexual Health
  • Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  • Sennalax-S — Medication
  • sevelamer — Medication
  • Sexuality While Breastfeeding
  • Serax — Medication
  • Self-Care After a Stroke
  • Sensory Processing Disorder
  • Sex During Pregnancy
  • Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy — Medical Test
  • Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  • Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  • Selenium TR — Medication
  • Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  • Separation Protests: Helping Your Child
  • Sensorcaine — Medication
  • Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  • To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly.

    Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often. If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.

  • Sexuality and Physical Changes With Aging
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  • Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  • Septra I.V. — Medication
  • Seminoma Testicular Cancer, Stage I, Deciding About Treatment
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Sepsis (Septic Shock)
  • Senokot — Medication
  • Sex and Your Heart
  • SEROquel XR — Medication
  • Sedimentation Rate (Sed Rate) — Medical Test
  • selegiline (oral) — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Treatment
  • semaglutide — Medication
  • Sexual Problems in Women
  • Sectral — Medication
  • Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.
  • Itchy skin, hives and eczema
  • Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing
  • selegiline (transdermal) — Medication
  • Serum Osmolality — Medical Test
  • Seromycin — Medication
  • Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy.

    Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.

  • Seasonal Affective Disorder: Using Light Therapy
  • Seasonale — Medication
  • Self-Esteem, Ages 6 to 10
  • Selzentry — Medication
  • Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached. Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections. Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish.

    As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  • SEROquel — Medication
  • Severity of Back Injuries
  • SenoSol-SS — Medication
  • SenoSol — Medication
  • SenoSol-X — Medication
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months
  • sebelipase alfa — Medication
  • Serevent Diskus — Medication
  • secobarbital — Medication
  • Septocaine — Medication
  • Sexual Abuse or Assault (Rape)
  • secnidazole — Medication
  • Seizure Medicine Levels in Blood — Medical Test
  • Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  • Sensory and Motor Development, Ages 12 to 24 Months
  • Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup (PDQ®): Integrative, alternative, and complementary therapies — Patient Information [NCI]
  • Senexon — Medication
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Genital Exam for Men
  • Serostim — Medication
  • Seconal Sodium — Medication
  • Seborrheic Keratoses
  • Secondary Adrenocortical Insufficiency
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections
  • Self-Massage
  • Second-Trimester Exams and Tests
  • Setting Goals
  • Secondary High Blood Pressure
  • Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.
  • Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  • Senna-gen — Medication
  • Seniortopix Healix — Medication
  • Senna Lax — Medication
  • Self-Test for Anxiety
  • Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  • Seabather’s Eruption
  • Antibiotics: Effective for the treatment of bacterial infections, antibiotics do not affect the course of uncomplicated common colds (a viral infection) and are of no benefit for noninfectious rhinitis, including allergic rhinitis.
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: Symptoms in Women
  • Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  • Segluromet — Medication
  • Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  • Senokot Additional — Medication
  • Senna — Medication
  • While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  • Seebri Neohaler — Medication
  • Semprex-D — Medication
  • Nasal surgery: Surgery is not a treatment for allergic rhinitis, but it may assist if patients own nasal polyps or chronic sinusitis that is not responsive to antibiotics or nasal steroid sprays.

◇Precaution◇

<Precautions>
■When not to use the product
1.

This drug should not be taken together with the following drugs:
Other internal medicine for rhinitis, internal medicine containing antihistamines (including freezing medicine, expectorant, medicine for motion sickness, medicine for allergies), indigestion and heartburn relief.
2. After taking this drug, do not drive a car or operate machinery (symptoms such as sleepiness, blurred vision and abnormal brightness may occur).
3. Do not take this medicine for a endless time

■Consultation
1. The following persons should contact a physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation before istration.
(1) Patients undergoing medical treatment from a physician.
(2) Pregnant women or women suspected of being pregnant.
(3) The elderly
(4) Patients who own experienced allergic symptoms associated with drugs, etc.
(5) Persons with the following symptoms:
Hyperthermia, urination difficulty
(6) Persons diagnosed as having the following:
Glaucoma, diabetes, thyroid disease, heart disease, hypertension
2.

If the following symptoms are observed after taking this drug, these may be adverse reactions, so immediately discontinue the use of this drug, and show this document to your physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation.
Skin:rash/redness, itching
Gastrointestinal system:nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite
Neuropsychiatric system: headache
Urinary system:urination difficulty
Other:facial boiling flashes, abnormal brightness

The following serious symptoms may happen in rare cases. In such cases, immediately seek medical aid:
Aplastic anemia: Symptoms, such as bruises, nose bleeds, bleeding gums, fever, pale appearance of skin and mucosa, fatigue, palpitations, shortness of breath, becoming dizzy from feeling ill and blood in the urine, etc.

may occur.
Agranulocytosis: Symptoms, such as acute high fever, chills and sore throat, etc. may occur.
3. The following symptoms may be observed after taking this drug. If these symptoms persist or worsen, discontinue the use of this drug, and show this document to your physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation.
dry mouth, sleepiness, constipation, blurred vision
4.When symptoms do not improve even after taking the medicine 5 to 6 times, stop taking this medicine and consult a physician, pharmacist or registered salesperson, being certain to take this instruction leaflet with you.

<Precautions of Dosage and istration>
(1) Strictly follow the prescribed dosage and istration.
(2) How to take the tablets out:
Press hard the protrusion of PTP sheet containing the tablets on the fingertips to break aluminum foil on the back.

Then take the capsules and ingest.

<Precautions for storage and handling>
(1) Store in a cool, low humidity put away from direct sunlight.
(2) Hold out of reach of children.
(3) Do not transfer the medicine to a diverse container.
(4) Do not take the product after its expiration date.

◇Disclaimer on Multilingual OTC Product Information◇

・This product is a pharmaceutical product approved under a Japanese law, the Law for Ensuring the Quality, Efficacy and Safety of Drugs and Medical Devices, with a view to its sale and use in Japan.
・Multilingual product information is a translation of the product labeling written in Japanese and provided for your information only.

It does not warrant that its contents and the product itself conforms to laws and regulations in countries other than Japan.
・Multilingual product information is a tentative translation by Our Company, and may be modified or altered without notice.
・Our Company assumes no responsibility for any occurred problem attributable to the contents of the multilingual product information.

Avoidance

The first approach in managing seasonal or perennial forms of hay fever should be to avoid the allergens that trigger symptoms.

Outdoor exposure

  1. Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  2. Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  3. Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  4. Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  5. Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  6. Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.

Indoor exposure

  1. Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home.

    Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.

  2. To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often. If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.
  3. Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom. Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs.

    Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least degrees Fahrenheit).

  4. Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.

Exposure to pets

  1. Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  2. If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible. If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.
  3. Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling.

    Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.

◇Dosage and istration◇

Take the following quantity of medicine.
Adults (15 years or over): 1 tablet per dose
Under 15 years: Do not take.
Number of doses per day: 1〜2 times

Medications

Many allergens that trigger allergic rhinitis are airborne, so you can’t always avoid them. If your symptoms can’t be well-controlled by simply avoiding triggers, your allergist may recommend medications that reduce nasal congestion, sneezing, and an itchy and runny nose.

They are available in numerous forms — oral tablets, liquid medication, nasal sprays and eyedrops. Some medications may own side effects, so discuss these treatments with your allergist so they can assist you live the life you want.

Intranasal corticosteroids

Intranasal corticosteroids are the single most effective drug class for treating allergic rhinitis. They can significantly reduce nasal congestion as well as sneezing, itching and a runny nose.

Ask your allergist about whether these medications are appropriate and safe for you. These sprays are designed to avoid the side effects that may happen from steroids that are taken by mouth or injection. Take care not to spray the medication against the middle portion of the nose (the nasal septum).

The most common side effects are local irritation and nasal bleeding. Some older preparations own been shown to own some effect on children’s growth; data about some newer steroids don’t indicate an effect on growth.

Leukatriene pathway inhibitors

Leukotriene pathway inhibitors (montelukast, zafirlukast and zileuton) block the action of leukotriene, a substance in the body that can cause symptoms of allergic rhinitis. These drugs are also used to treat asthma.

Decongestants

Decongestants assist relieve the stuffiness and pressure caused by swollen nasal tissue.

They do not contain antihistamines, so they do not cause antihistaminic side effects. They do not relieve other symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Oral decongestants are available as prescription and nonprescription medications and are often found in combination with antihistamines or other medications. It is not unusual for patients using decongestants to experience insomnia if they take the medication in the afternoon or evening. If this occurs, a dose reduction may be needed. At times, men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on decongestants.

Patients using medications to manage emotional or behavioral problems should discuss this with their allergist before using decongestants. Patients with high blood pressure or heart disease should check with their allergist before using. Pregnant patients should also check with their allergist before starting decongestants.

Nonprescription decongestant nasal sprays work within minutes and final for hours, but you should not use them for more than a few days at a time unless instructed by your allergist. Prolonged use can cause rhinitis medicamentosa, or rebound swelling of the nasal tissue. Stopping the use of the decongestant nasal spray will cure that swelling, provided that there is no underlying disorder.

Oral decongestants are found in numerous over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications, and may be the treatment of choice for nasal congestion.

They don’t cause rhinitis medicamentosa but need to be avoided by some patients with high blood pressure. If you own high blood pressure or heart problems, check with your allergist before using them.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy may be recommended for people who don’t reply well to treatment with medications or who experience side effects from medications, who own allergen exposure that is unavoidable or who desire a more permanent solution to their allergies. Immunotherapy can be extremely effective in controlling allergic symptoms, but it doesn’t assist the symptoms produced by nonallergic rhinitis.

Two types of immunotherapy are available: allergy shots and sublingual (under-the-tongue) tablets.

  1. Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached.

    Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections. Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish. As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  2. Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily.

    Treatment can continue for as endless as three years. Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.

Nasal sprays

Nonprescription saline nasal sprays will assist counteract symptoms such as dry nasal passages or thick nasal mucus. Unlike decongestant nasal sprays, a saline nasal spray can be used as often as it is needed. Sometimes an allergist may recommend washing (douching) the nasal passage. There are numerous OTC delivery systems for saline rinses, including neti pots and saline rinse bottles.

Nasal cromolyn blocks the body’s release of allergy-causing substances.

It does not work in every patients. The full dose is four times daily, and improvement of symptoms may take several weeks. Nasal cromolyn can assist prevent allergic nasal reactions if taken prior to an allergen exposure.

Nasal ipratropium bromide spray can assist reduce nasal drainage from allergic rhinitis or some forms of nonallergic rhinitis.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic rhinitis.

These medications counter the effects of histamine, the irritating chemical released within your body when an allergic reaction takes put. Although other chemicals are involved, histamine is primarily responsible for causing the symptoms. Antihistamines are found in eyedrops, nasal sprays and, most commonly, oral tablets and syrup.

Antihistamines assist to relieve nasal allergy symptoms such as:

  1. Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  2. Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  3. Itchy skin, hives and eczema

There are dozens of antihistamines; some are available over the counter, while others require a prescription.

Patients reply to them in a wide variety of ways.

Generally, the newer (second-generation) products work well and produce only minor side effects. Some people discover that an antihistamine becomes less effective as the allergy season worsens or as their allergies change over time. If you discover that an antihistamine is becoming less effective, tell your allergist, who may recommend a diverse type or strength of antihistamine. If you own excessive nasal dryness or thick nasal mucus, consult an allergist before taking antihistamines. Contact your allergist for advice if an antihistamine causes drowsiness or other side effects.

Proper use: Short-acting antihistamines can be taken every four to six hours, while timed-release antihistamines are taken every 12 to 24 hours.

The short-acting antihistamines are often most helpful if taken 30 minutes before an anticipated exposure to an allergen (such as at a picnic during ragweed season). Timed-release antihistamines are better suited to long-term use for those who need daily medications. Proper use of these drugs is just as significant as their selection. The most effective way to use them is before symptoms develop. A dose taken early can eliminate the need for numerous later doses to reduce established symptoms. Numerous times a patient will tell that he or she “took one, and it didn’t work.” If the patient had taken the antihistamine regularly for three to four days to build up blood levels of the medication, it might own been effective.

Side effects: Older (first-generation) antihistamines may cause drowsiness or performance impairment, which can lead to accidents and personal injury.

Even when these medications are taken only at bedtime, they can still cause considerable impairment the following day, even in people who do not feel drowsy. For this reason, it is significant that you do not drive a car or work with dangerous machinery when you take a potentially sedating antihistamine. Some of the newer antihistamines do not cause drowsiness.

A frequent side effect is excessive dryness of the mouth, nose and eyes.

Less common side effects include restlessness, nervousness, overexcitability, insomnia, dizziness, headaches, euphoria, fainting, visual disturbances, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distress, constipation, diarrhea, increased or decreased urination, urinary retention, high or low blood pressure, nightmares (especially in children), sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, chest tightness or palpitations. Men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on antihistamines. Consult your allergist if these reactions occur.

Important precautions:

  1. Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  2. Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy.

    Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.

  3. Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  4. Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  5. Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  6. While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  7. Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  8. Never take anyone else’s medication.

Eye allergy preparations and eyedrops

Eye allergy preparations may be helpful when the eyes are affected by the same allergens that trigger rhinitis, causing redness, swelling, watery eyes and itching.

OTC eyedrops and oral medications are commonly used for short-term relief of some eye allergy symptoms. They may not relieve every symptoms, though, and prolonged use of some of these drops may actually cause your condition to worsen.

Prescription eyedrops and oral medications also are used to treat eye allergies. Prescription eyedrops provide both short- and long-term targeted relief of eye allergy symptoms, and can be used to manage them.

Check with your allergist or pharmacist if you are unsure about a specific drug or formula.

◇Ingredient and amount◇

In 2 tablets
[The inner core]
Chlorpheniramine maleate 6mg
Phenylephrine Hydrochloride 6mg
Datura Extract 12mg
[The outer shell]
Chlorpheniramine maleate 6mg
Phenylephrine Hydrochloride 6mg
Datura Extract 12mg

◇Indication◇

Relief of the following symptoms due to acute or allergic rhinitis; sneezing, runny nose, stuffy nose, watery eyes, heaviness in the head

Treatments that are not recommended for allergic rhinitis

  1. Antibiotics: Effective for the treatment of bacterial infections, antibiotics do not affect the course of uncomplicated common colds (a viral infection) and are of no benefit for noninfectious rhinitis, including allergic rhinitis.
  2. Nasal surgery: Surgery is not a treatment for allergic rhinitis, but it may assist if patients own nasal polyps or chronic sinusitis that is not responsive to antibiotics or nasal steroid sprays.
Significant Safety Information for HyperRHO® S/D Full Dose (RhO[D] immune globulin
[human])

HyperRHO® S/D Full Dose (RhO[D] immune globulin [human]) is indicated for prevention of Rh hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) and the prevention of isoimmunization in RhO(D) negative individuals who own been transfused with RhO(D) positive red blood cells.

HyperRHO S/D Full Dose is made from human plasma.

Because this product is made from human plasma, it may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents, such as viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent.

Never ister HyperRHO S/D Full Dose intravenously. Inject only intramuscularly. Never ister to the neonate.

RhO(D) immune globulin (human) should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the istration of human immunoglobulin preparations.

Such persons own increased potential for developing antibodies to IgA and could own anaphylactic reactions to subsequent istration of blood products that contain IgA.

As with every preparations istered by the intramuscular route, bleeding complications may be encountered in patients with thrombocytopenia or other bleeding disorders.

A large fetomaternal hemorrhage tardy in pregnancy or following delivery may cause a feeble mixed field positive DU test result. If there is any doubt about the mother’s Rh type, she should be given RhO(D) immune globulin (human).

A screening test to detect fetal red blood cells may be helpful in such cases.

If more than 15 mL of D-positive red blood cells are present in the mother’s circulation, more than a single dose of HyperRHO S/D Full Dose is required. Failure to recognize this may result in the istration of an inadequate dose.

Although systemic reactions to human immunoglobulin preparations are rare, epinephrine should be available for treatment of acute anaphylactic symptoms.

istration of live virus vaccines (eg, MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after RhO(D) immune globulin (human) istration.

HyperRHO S/D Full Dose should be given in pregnant women only if clearly needed because animal reproduction studies own not been conducted.

Reactions to RhO(D) immune globulin (human) are infrequent in RhO(D)-negative individuals and consist primarily of slight soreness at the site of injection and slight temperature elevation.

While sensitization to repeated injections of human immunoglobulin is extremely rare, it has occurred.

Elevated bilirubin levels own been reported in some individuals receiving multiple doses of RhO(D) immune globulin (human) following mismatched transfusions. This is believed to be due to a relatively rapid rate of foreign red cell destruction.

Please see full Prescribing Information for HyperRHO S/D Full Dose.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit or call FDA

Senokot-S

Generic Name:Docusate and Senna (DOK yoo sate & SEN na)
Brand Name: Doc-Q-Lax, Docuzen, DOK Plus, GoodSense Stimulant Laxative, Laxacin, show every 16 brand -Laxx, Peri-Colace, Senexon-S, Senna Plus, Senna S, Senna-Plus, Senna-S, Senna-Time S, Sennalax-S, Senokot S, Stool Softener/Laxative

Medically reviewed by Final updated on Aug 3,

◇Precaution◇

<Precautions>
■When not to use the product
1.

This drug should not be taken together with the following drugs:
Other internal medicine for rhinitis, internal medicine containing antihistamines (including freezing medicine, expectorant, medicine for motion sickness, medicine for allergies), indigestion and heartburn relief.
2. After taking this drug, do not drive a car or operate machinery (symptoms such as sleepiness, blurred vision and abnormal brightness may occur).
3. Do not take this medicine for a endless time

■Consultation
1. The following persons should contact a physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation before istration.
(1) Patients undergoing medical treatment from a physician.
(2) Pregnant women or women suspected of being pregnant.
(3) The elderly
(4) Patients who own experienced allergic symptoms associated with drugs, etc.
(5) Persons with the following symptoms:
Hyperthermia, urination difficulty
(6) Persons diagnosed as having the following:
Glaucoma, diabetes, thyroid disease, heart disease, hypertension
2.

If the following symptoms are observed after taking this drug, these may be adverse reactions, so immediately discontinue the use of this drug, and show this document to your physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation.
Skin:rash/redness, itching
Gastrointestinal system:nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite
Neuropsychiatric system: headache
Urinary system:urination difficulty
Other:facial boiling flashes, abnormal brightness

The following serious symptoms may happen in rare cases. In such cases, immediately seek medical aid:
Aplastic anemia: Symptoms, such as bruises, nose bleeds, bleeding gums, fever, pale appearance of skin and mucosa, fatigue, palpitations, shortness of breath, becoming dizzy from feeling ill and blood in the urine, etc.

may occur.
Agranulocytosis: Symptoms, such as acute high fever, chills and sore throat, etc. may occur.
3. The following symptoms may be observed after taking this drug. If these symptoms persist or worsen, discontinue the use of this drug, and show this document to your physician, pharmacist, or registered salesperson for a consultation.
dry mouth, sleepiness, constipation, blurred vision
4.When symptoms do not improve even after taking the medicine 5 to 6 times, stop taking this medicine and consult a physician, pharmacist or registered salesperson, being certain to take this instruction leaflet with you.

<Precautions of Dosage and istration>
(1) Strictly follow the prescribed dosage and istration.
(2) How to take the tablets out:
Press hard the protrusion of PTP sheet containing the tablets on the fingertips to break aluminum foil on the back. Then take the capsules and ingest.

<Precautions for storage and handling>
(1) Store in a cool, low humidity put away from direct sunlight.
(2) Hold out of reach of children.
(3) Do not transfer the medicine to a diverse container.
(4) Do not take the product after its expiration date.

◇Disclaimer on Multilingual OTC Product Information◇

・This product is a pharmaceutical product approved under a Japanese law, the Law for Ensuring the Quality, Efficacy and Safety of Drugs and Medical Devices, with a view to its sale and use in Japan.
・Multilingual product information is a translation of the product labeling written in Japanese and provided for your information only. It does not warrant that its contents and the product itself conforms to laws and regulations in countries other than Japan.
・Multilingual product information is a tentative translation by Our Company, and may be modified or altered without notice.
・Our Company assumes no responsibility for any occurred problem attributable to the contents of the multilingual product information.

Avoidance

The first approach in managing seasonal or perennial forms of hay fever should be to avoid the allergens that trigger symptoms.

Outdoor exposure

  1. Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  2. Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  3. Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  4. Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  5. Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  6. Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.

Indoor exposure

  1. Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home.

    Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.

  2. To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often. If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.
  3. Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom. Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs. Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least degrees Fahrenheit).
  4. Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.

Exposure to pets

  1. Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  2. If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible.

    If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.

  3. Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling. Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.

◇Dosage and istration◇

Take the following quantity of medicine.
Adults (15 years or over): 1 tablet per dose
Under 15 years: Do not take.
Number of doses per day: 1〜2 times

Medications

Many allergens that trigger allergic rhinitis are airborne, so you can’t always avoid them. If your symptoms can’t be well-controlled by simply avoiding triggers, your allergist may recommend medications that reduce nasal congestion, sneezing, and an itchy and runny nose.

They are available in numerous forms — oral tablets, liquid medication, nasal sprays and eyedrops. Some medications may own side effects, so discuss these treatments with your allergist so they can assist you live the life you want.

Intranasal corticosteroids

Intranasal corticosteroids are the single most effective drug class for treating allergic rhinitis. They can significantly reduce nasal congestion as well as sneezing, itching and a runny nose.

Ask your allergist about whether these medications are appropriate and safe for you. These sprays are designed to avoid the side effects that may happen from steroids that are taken by mouth or injection.

Take care not to spray the medication against the middle portion of the nose (the nasal septum). The most common side effects are local irritation and nasal bleeding. Some older preparations own been shown to own some effect on children’s growth; data about some newer steroids don’t indicate an effect on growth.

Leukatriene pathway inhibitors

Leukotriene pathway inhibitors (montelukast, zafirlukast and zileuton) block the action of leukotriene, a substance in the body that can cause symptoms of allergic rhinitis. These drugs are also used to treat asthma.

Decongestants

Decongestants assist relieve the stuffiness and pressure caused by swollen nasal tissue.

They do not contain antihistamines, so they do not cause antihistaminic side effects. They do not relieve other symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Oral decongestants are available as prescription and nonprescription medications and are often found in combination with antihistamines or other medications. It is not unusual for patients using decongestants to experience insomnia if they take the medication in the afternoon or evening. If this occurs, a dose reduction may be needed. At times, men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on decongestants.

Patients using medications to manage emotional or behavioral problems should discuss this with their allergist before using decongestants. Patients with high blood pressure or heart disease should check with their allergist before using. Pregnant patients should also check with their allergist before starting decongestants.

Nonprescription decongestant nasal sprays work within minutes and final for hours, but you should not use them for more than a few days at a time unless instructed by your allergist.

Prolonged use can cause rhinitis medicamentosa, or rebound swelling of the nasal tissue. Stopping the use of the decongestant nasal spray will cure that swelling, provided that there is no underlying disorder.

Oral decongestants are found in numerous over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications, and may be the treatment of choice for nasal congestion. They don’t cause rhinitis medicamentosa but need to be avoided by some patients with high blood pressure. If you own high blood pressure or heart problems, check with your allergist before using them.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy may be recommended for people who don’t reply well to treatment with medications or who experience side effects from medications, who own allergen exposure that is unavoidable or who desire a more permanent solution to their allergies.

Immunotherapy can be extremely effective in controlling allergic symptoms, but it doesn’t assist the symptoms produced by nonallergic rhinitis.

Two types of immunotherapy are available: allergy shots and sublingual (under-the-tongue) tablets.

  1. Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached.

    Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections. Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish. As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  2. Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily.

    Treatment can continue for as endless as three years. Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.

Nasal sprays

Nonprescription saline nasal sprays will assist counteract symptoms such as dry nasal passages or thick nasal mucus. Unlike decongestant nasal sprays, a saline nasal spray can be used as often as it is needed. Sometimes an allergist may recommend washing (douching) the nasal passage. There are numerous OTC delivery systems for saline rinses, including neti pots and saline rinse bottles.

Nasal cromolyn blocks the body’s release of allergy-causing substances.

It does not work in every patients. The full dose is four times daily, and improvement of symptoms may take several weeks. Nasal cromolyn can assist prevent allergic nasal reactions if taken prior to an allergen exposure.

Nasal ipratropium bromide spray can assist reduce nasal drainage from allergic rhinitis or some forms of nonallergic rhinitis.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic rhinitis. These medications counter the effects of histamine, the irritating chemical released within your body when an allergic reaction takes put.

Although other chemicals are involved, histamine is primarily responsible for causing the symptoms. Antihistamines are found in eyedrops, nasal sprays and, most commonly, oral tablets and syrup.

Antihistamines assist to relieve nasal allergy symptoms such as:

  1. Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  2. Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  3. Itchy skin, hives and eczema

There are dozens of antihistamines; some are available over the counter, while others require a prescription.

Patients reply to them in a wide variety of ways.

Generally, the newer (second-generation) products work well and produce only minor side effects. Some people discover that an antihistamine becomes less effective as the allergy season worsens or as their allergies change over time. If you discover that an antihistamine is becoming less effective, tell your allergist, who may recommend a diverse type or strength of antihistamine.

If you own excessive nasal dryness or thick nasal mucus, consult an allergist before taking antihistamines. Contact your allergist for advice if an antihistamine causes drowsiness or other side effects.

Proper use: Short-acting antihistamines can be taken every four to six hours, while timed-release antihistamines are taken every 12 to 24 hours. The short-acting antihistamines are often most helpful if taken 30 minutes before an anticipated exposure to an allergen (such as at a picnic during ragweed season).

Timed-release antihistamines are better suited to long-term use for those who need daily medications. Proper use of these drugs is just as significant as their selection. The most effective way to use them is before symptoms develop. A dose taken early can eliminate the need for numerous later doses to reduce established symptoms. Numerous times a patient will tell that he or she “took one, and it didn’t work.” If the patient had taken the antihistamine regularly for three to four days to build up blood levels of the medication, it might own been effective.

Side effects: Older (first-generation) antihistamines may cause drowsiness or performance impairment, which can lead to accidents and personal injury.

Even when these medications are taken only at bedtime, they can still cause considerable impairment the following day, even in people who do not feel drowsy. For this reason, it is significant that you do not drive a car or work with dangerous machinery when you take a potentially sedating antihistamine. Some of the newer antihistamines do not cause drowsiness.

A frequent side effect is excessive dryness of the mouth, nose and eyes. Less common side effects include restlessness, nervousness, overexcitability, insomnia, dizziness, headaches, euphoria, fainting, visual disturbances, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distress, constipation, diarrhea, increased or decreased urination, urinary retention, high or low blood pressure, nightmares (especially in children), sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, chest tightness or palpitations.

Men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on antihistamines.

What is safe to take for allergies when pregnant

Consult your allergist if these reactions occur.

Important precautions:

  1. Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  2. Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy. Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.
  3. Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  4. Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  5. Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  6. While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  7. Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  8. Never take anyone else’s medication.

Eye allergy preparations and eyedrops

Eye allergy preparations may be helpful when the eyes are affected by the same allergens that trigger rhinitis, causing redness, swelling, watery eyes and itching.

OTC eyedrops and oral medications are commonly used for short-term relief of some eye allergy symptoms. They may not relieve every symptoms, though, and prolonged use of some of these drops may actually cause your condition to worsen.

Prescription eyedrops and oral medications also are used to treat eye allergies. Prescription eyedrops provide both short- and long-term targeted relief of eye allergy symptoms, and can be used to manage them.

Check with your allergist or pharmacist if you are unsure about a specific drug or formula.

◇Ingredient and amount◇

In 2 tablets
[The inner core]
Chlorpheniramine maleate 6mg
Phenylephrine Hydrochloride 6mg
Datura Extract 12mg
[The outer shell]
Chlorpheniramine maleate 6mg
Phenylephrine Hydrochloride 6mg
Datura Extract 12mg

◇Indication◇

Relief of the following symptoms due to acute or allergic rhinitis; sneezing, runny nose, stuffy nose, watery eyes, heaviness in the head

Treatments that are not recommended for allergic rhinitis

  1. Antibiotics: Effective for the treatment of bacterial infections, antibiotics do not affect the course of uncomplicated common colds (a viral infection) and are of no benefit for noninfectious rhinitis, including allergic rhinitis.
  2. Nasal surgery: Surgery is not a treatment for allergic rhinitis, but it may assist if patients own nasal polyps or chronic sinusitis that is not responsive to antibiotics or nasal steroid sprays.
Significant Safety Information for HyperRHO® S/D Full Dose (RhO[D] immune globulin
[human])

HyperRHO® S/D Full Dose (RhO[D] immune globulin [human]) is indicated for prevention of Rh hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) and the prevention of isoimmunization in RhO(D) negative individuals who own been transfused with RhO(D) positive red blood cells.

HyperRHO S/D Full Dose is made from human plasma.

Because this product is made from human plasma, it may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents, such as viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent.

Never ister HyperRHO S/D Full Dose intravenously. Inject only intramuscularly. Never ister to the neonate.

RhO(D) immune globulin (human) should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the istration of human immunoglobulin preparations.

Such persons own increased potential for developing antibodies to IgA and could own anaphylactic reactions to subsequent istration of blood products that contain IgA.

As with every preparations istered by the intramuscular route, bleeding complications may be encountered in patients with thrombocytopenia or other bleeding disorders.

A large fetomaternal hemorrhage tardy in pregnancy or following delivery may cause a feeble mixed field positive DU test result. If there is any doubt about the mother’s Rh type, she should be given RhO(D) immune globulin (human). A screening test to detect fetal red blood cells may be helpful in such cases.

If more than 15 mL of D-positive red blood cells are present in the mother’s circulation, more than a single dose of HyperRHO S/D Full Dose is required.

Failure to recognize this may result in the istration of an inadequate dose.

Although systemic reactions to human immunoglobulin preparations are rare, epinephrine should be available for treatment of acute anaphylactic symptoms.

istration of live virus vaccines (eg, MMR) should be deferred for approximately 3 months after RhO(D) immune globulin (human) istration.

HyperRHO S/D Full Dose should be given in pregnant women only if clearly needed because animal reproduction studies own not been conducted.

Reactions to RhO(D) immune globulin (human) are infrequent in RhO(D)-negative individuals and consist primarily of slight soreness at the site of injection and slight temperature elevation.

While sensitization to repeated injections of human immunoglobulin is extremely rare, it has occurred.

Elevated bilirubin levels own been reported in some individuals receiving multiple doses of RhO(D) immune globulin (human) following mismatched transfusions. This is believed to be due to a relatively rapid rate of foreign red cell destruction.

Please see full Prescribing Information for HyperRHO S/D Full Dose.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit or call FDA

Senokot-S

Generic Name:Docusate and Senna (DOK yoo sate & SEN na)
Brand Name: Doc-Q-Lax, Docuzen, DOK Plus, GoodSense Stimulant Laxative, Laxacin, show every 16 brand -Laxx, Peri-Colace, Senexon-S, Senna Plus, Senna S, Senna-Plus, Senna-S, Senna-Time S, Sennalax-S, Senokot S, Stool Softener/Laxative

Medically reviewed by Final updated on Aug 3,


What are some things I need to know or do while I take Senokot S?

  1. Do not use Senokot S (docusate and senna) for more than 1 week unless told to do so by your doctor.

  2. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using Senokot S (docusate and senna) while you are pregnant.
  3. If you own rectal bleeding or you do not own a bowel movement after using Senokot S (docusate and senna), talk with your doctor.
  4. Do not use other laxatives or stool softeners unless told to do so by the doctor.
  5. Tell every of your health care providers that you take Senokot S (docusate and senna).

    This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.

  6. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.


What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about correct away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may own extremely bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical assist correct away if you own any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a extremely bad side effect:

  1. Signs of an allergic reaction, love rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.


How is this medicine (Senokot S) best taken?

Use Senokot S (docusate and senna) as ordered by your doctor. Read every information given to you. Follow every instructions closely.

  1. Follow how to take Senokot S (docusate and senna) as you own been told by your doctor. Do not use more than you were told to use.
  2. Take with a full glass of water.
  3. Take at bedtime if taking once a day.

  4. Do not take other drugs within 2 hours of Senokot S (docusate and senna).

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  1. If you take Senokot S (docusate and senna) on a regular basis, take a missed dose as soon as you ponder about it.
  2. Do not take 2 doses at the same time or additional doses.
  3. If it is shut to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  4. Many times Senokot S (docusate and senna) is taken on an as needed basis. Do not take more often than told by the doctor.


What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Senokot S?

  1. If you own an allergy to docusate, senna, or any other part of Senokot S (docusate and senna).

  2. If you own any of these health problems: Bowel block, stomach pain, upset stomach, rectal bleeding, throwing up, or change in bowel habits lasting longer than 2 weeks.
  3. If you are allergic to any drugs love this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, love rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  4. If you are taking mineral oil.

This is not a list of every drugs or health problems that interact with Senokot S (docusate and senna).

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about every of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems.

You must check to make certain that it is safe for you to take Senokot S (docusate and senna) with every of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.


What are some other side effects of Senokot S?

Every drugs may cause side effects. However, numerous people own no side effects or only own minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical assist if you own any side effects that annoy you or do not go away.

These are not every of the side effects that may happen. If you own questions about side effects, call your doctor.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at FDA You may also report side effects at


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