What is latex food allergy


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Food Allergy: Know the Facts

Do you, or someone you know own a food allergy?

What is latex food allergy

Food allergies can be extremely serious or even deadly for those that are highly sensitive. While most food allergies in adults are caused by a little group of foods or food products, adverse reactions in young children can be caused by a wider variety of food.

What is a Food Allergy?

A food allergy is a specific immune system reaction that happens after a person consumes what is normally considered a safe food. Food allergies happen more often in children than in adults. Approximately % of children (aged 4 or under) and about 2% of adults own food allergies.

Allergic reactions to food lead to over 30, emergency room visits and 2, hospitalizations per year. There are approximately fatalities associated with food allergic reactions in the US annually.

90% of food allergies in the US are made with food allergens and products made with them.

  1. Peanuts
  2. Egg
  3. Shellfish (e.g., crab, lobster, shrimp, and crayfish)
  4. Milk
  5. Tree nuts (walnuts, almonds, cashews, pistachios, pecans, and hazlenuts)
  6. Wheat
  7. Soy

What Causes Food Allergies?

A true allergy is caused by a persons immune system reacting to a protein(s) in a specific food.

What is latex food allergy

The process begins when the food is first eaten; the body remembers the specific protein(s) in the food. When the same food is eaten again, the immune system overreacts in an excessive and potentially   True food allergies are caused by the rapid release of immunoglobin E antibodies after a person ingests the problematic food. This over-production of IgE is triggered by the food allergen and causes either a local or systemic effect, such as inflammation, sever swelling, or hypersensitivity reactions.

What Are Food Allergy Symptoms?

The reaction to an allergen is related to the overproduction of IgE after consuming the problematic food.

Symptoms can happen locally, in multiple locations, or can be spread over the entire body.

  1. Swelling of the lips or tongue
  2. Hoarseness and sensation of tightness in throat
  3. Abdominal pain or cramps
  4. Itching/tingling of lips, palate, tongue, or throat
  5. Nausea and/or vomiting
  6. Diarrhea

Who is at Risk?

People who had previous allergic reactions to food or non-food items such as insect bites and latex, or who own a family history of allergies, are most susceptible to developing allergies.

Generally, food allergies are developed at an early age, but some may appear at any time.

What is Anaphylaxis?

Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that rapidly affects the entire body and, if not treated, can be fatal.

What is latex food allergy

The symptoms are caused by the bodys tissue releasing histamines and other substances. This results in tightening of airways, which makes the reaction more severe than a normal allergic reaction. Severe reactions can also cause unconsciousness due to decreased blood flow. Anaphylaxis is commonly seen in children and young adults, but can affect anyone.

Managing Food Allergies

If a person has an allergy to a specific food, any meal containing that food, even as flavoring, may cause an allergic response. It is significant to carefully read food labels and ingredient lists if a person has a known food allergy.

What is latex food allergy

Almost any food that contains protein has the potential to cause an allergy or hypersensitivity reaction in a susceptible person. Food allergies are only triggered by proteins. Sugars and fats do not cause food allergies.

How to Deal with a Severe Allergic Reaction

If a person has an allergy to a specific food, the only proven therapy is strict avoidance of the food or its products. If a person has a minor allergic reaction to a food, oral antihistamines can be taken, but in the case of severe reactions, the medication of choice is an injection of epinephrine.

A person suffering from anaphylaxis should be taken to a hospital immediately.

While there is no cure for food allergies, there are some promising studies of new treatments. Guidelines and regulations are updated as more research is conducted. With every new finding, the most precise information is passed on to the consumers, thus minimizing the risk of adverse allergic reactions.

If you would love to know more about food allergies, visit or contact your local extension office.

Jana Hart-Extension Agent- FCS, 4-H

Category: Food Safety, Health & Nutrition, Relationships & Family, Work & Life

Tags: allergy, awareness, food, food allergy, health, nutrition, peanut allergy

Managing Students with Life Threatening Allergies

In order to minimize the incidence of life threatening allergic reactions, the Belmont Public Schools (BPS) will do the following:

Request information from parents re: life threatening allergy

  1. Ask parent about history of past reactions, interventions and outcome
  2. Provide parent with cover letter and Emergency Health Care Plan to be completed with health care provider, preferably an asthma/allergist specialist.

Implement an Individualized Health Care Plan (IHCP) for each student.

  1. Discuss allergens and possible student specific symptoms.
  2. Identify student to his or her teachers and cafeteria staff
  3. Review emergency response in the event of a reaction.

Send letter home to classroom parents, grades K-4, that requests foods sent in for snack or breakfasts avoid containing the stated allergen(s).

  1. All foods sent in for sharing must be prepackaged and unopened with an intact ingredient label.

Schools will urge parents and teachers to own food free school parties and celebrations. Birthdays will not be celebrated with food.

Provide an allergen free table in the cafeteria when necessary.

Nurses will maintain a red Life Threatening Allergy binder on desk which will contain Emergency Health Care Plans for every identified students for whom parents own provided information.

What is latex food allergy

  1. The Emergency Health Care Plan, contained in the Substitute Teacher folder, will be identified on the exterior of the folder with a special alert.
  2. Emergency Health Care Plans will be updated annually and as information changes. Copies of this plan may be located in the classroom, in the substitute folder and in the cafeteria (when appropriate).
  3. Substitute teachers will be asked to check in with the school nurse, prior to the start of the school day, to review this plan.

In September, nurses attend a faculty meeting to provide staff with information including a presentation regarding:

  1. how to recognize symptoms of an allergic reaction
  2. the most common allergens that cause life threatening allergies such as foods, medications, latex and stinging insects
  3. the emergency response in the event of an allergic reaction

Staff training in istration of EpiPen is offered according to Department of Public Health guidelines for every Belmont Public School employees who come in contact with the identified student.

Nurses will determine who will be designated to ister EpiPen in his / her absence.

  1. Parents will monitor the expiration date on their childs EpiPen and replace it as needed.
  2. EpiPens (belonging to the school and those prescribed to the student) will be available in the nurses office and other clearly designated locations as specified in the IHP.
  3. Staff will be informed of the location of the EpiPens.

Review / update training for staff in January.

Email reminders to staff re: food allergies and risk for anaphylaxis at high risk times of year.

i.e. Halloween, winter holidays; Easter; finish of year celebrations

Field Journey procedure (student packet includes EHCP; EPI PEN; laminated card with instructions.)

  1. Insure that a communication device is available to the identified staff person.
  2. Identify staff person responsible for istering Epi Pen in the event of an allergic reaction.
  3. Instruct parent to contact school nurse when they sign a permission form for trip/event.
  4. Locate nearest emergency response unit to field journey site and provide telephone number to that unit.
  5. Teachers will discourage students from eating foods on the bus unless medically indicated.

School bus drivers will be notified of the student(s) who own life threatening allergies, by parents, if they wish the driver to be informed.

Telephone procedure — laminated cards in office(s)/nurses clinic Emergency Allergy Procedure

Assist parents in reading food labels and urge communication with Belmont food service.

Parents are reminded (in writing) to share information with coaches, KED, before and after school programs.

End of year request for update/ review of EHCP mailed home.

The schools will work with food allergic students and parents to address the students social and emotional needs, as well as provide for their health and safety.

Reviewed August

Allergy

Food Allergy

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  1. Soy
  2. Wheat
  3. Children
  4. Cow’s Milk Allergy
  5. Peanuts
  6. Tree nuts
  7. Adults
  8. Crustaceans (e.g.

    shrimp, lobster)

  9. Egg Whites
  10. Peanuts
  11. Common Food Allergies
  12. Causes
  13. Fish
  • Children
    • Wheat
    • Egg Whites
    • Cow’s Milk Allergy
    • Soy
    • Peanuts
  • Adults
  • Adults
    • Peanuts
    • Tree nuts
    • Crustaceans (e.g. shrimp, lobster)
    • Fish
    • Hazelnuts
    1. Hazelnuts
    2. Birch pollen allergy
      1. Hazelnuts
      2. Birch pollen allergy
      3. Carrot
      4. Kiwi
      5. Celery
      6. Fresh fruit (apples, cherries, nectarines, peaches, pears)
      7. Grass pollen
      8. Kiwi
      9. Potatoes
      10. Parsnips
      11. Ragweed pollen
      12. Bananas
      13. Causes
      14. Avocado
      15. Tomato
      16. See Oral Allergy Syndrome
      17. Latex Allergy
      18. Banana
      19. Cross-reactivity with contact or air-borne allergens
      20. Melons (canteloupe, honeydew, watermelon)
    3. See Oral Allergy Syndrome
    4. Latex Allergy
      • Kiwi
      • Banana
      • Avocado
    5. Birch pollen allergy
    6. Birch pollen allergy
      • Hazelnuts
      • Celery
      • Parsnips
      • Carrot
      • Potatoes
      • Fresh fruit (apples, cherries, nectarines, peaches, pears)
    7. Grass pollen
    8. Grass pollen
      • Kiwi
      • Tomato
    9. Ragweed pollen
    10. Ragweed pollen
      • Melons (canteloupe, honeydew, watermelon)
      • Bananas
      • Angioedema (IgE mediated)
      1. Angioedema (IgE mediated)
      2. Skin reactions
        1. Angioedema (IgE mediated)
        2. Skin reactions
        3. Acute Urticaria (IgE mediated)
        4. Laryngeal Angioedema
        5. Contact Urticaria (IgE and non-Ige mediated)
        6. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (IgE and non-IgE mediated)
        7. Food protein-induced enterocolitis (non-IgE mediated)
        8. Gastrointestinal food allergies
        9. Dietary Protein-induced Proctocolitis (non-IgE mediated to milk in infants)
        10. Allergic Contact Dermatitis (cell-mediated)
        11. Immediate GI hypersensitivity (IgE mediated)
        12. Types
        13. Emergent presentations
        14. Food-induced Anaphylaxis
        15. Clinical Presentations of Food Allergies
        16. Oral Allergy Syndrome (cross-reactivity among foods; prevented by cooking offending food)
      3. Emergent presentations
        • Food-induced Anaphylaxis
        • Laryngeal Angioedema
      4. Skin reactions
      5. Skin reactions
        • Allergic Contact Dermatitis (cell-mediated)
        • Acute Urticaria (IgE mediated)
        • Angioedema (IgE mediated)
        • Contact Urticaria (IgE and non-Ige mediated)
      6. Gastrointestinal food allergies
      7. Gastrointestinal food allergies
        • Immediate GI hypersensitivity (IgE mediated)
        • Food protein-induced enterocolitis (non-IgE mediated)
        • Eosinophilic Esophagitis (IgE and non-IgE mediated)
        • Oral Allergy Syndrome (cross-reactivity among foods; prevented by cooking offending food)
        • Airway Foreign Body
        • Dietary Protein-induced Proctocolitis (non-IgE mediated to milk in infants)
        • Postprandial collapse
        1. Airway Foreign Body
        2. Postprandial collapse
        3. Non-allergic food reaction
          1. Airway Foreign Body
          2. Postprandial collapse
          3. Non-allergic food reaction
          4. Monosodium glutamate
          5. Differential Diagnosis
          6. Sulfite reaction
          7. Scombroid Fish Poisoning (vasoactive amines)
        4. Airway Foreign Body
        5. Non-allergic food reaction
          • Sulfite reaction
          • Monosodium glutamate
          • Scombroid Fish Poisoning (vasoactive amines)
          1. Differentiate from Infantile Colic
            1. Differentiate from Infantile Colic
            2. Colic will resolve spontaneously after months
            3. Milk Allergy or intolerance with GI Symptoms
            4. Milk substitution is unnecessary
            5. Management
            6. Substitute Casein Hydrolysate (Cow’s Milk) Formula
            7. Nutramigen, Pregestimil, Alimentum
            8. Soy-based formula is not appropriate substitution
          2. Differentiate from Infantile Colic
            • Colic will resolve spontaneously after months
            • Milk substitution is unnecessary
          3. Substitute Casein Hydrolysate (Cow’s Milk) Formula
          4. Substitute Casein Hydrolysate (Cow’s Milk) Formula
            • Nutramigen, Pregestimil, Alimentum
            • Soy-based formula is not appropriate substitution
            1. Mix with other foods
              1. Mix with other foods
              2. Eggs in baked products (instead of scrambled eggs)
              3. Reintroduction of prior food allergies
              4. Management
              5. Milk in Cheese or yogurt (instead of glass of milk)
              6. Do not reintroduce foods with previous Anaphylaxis
              7. Do not re-introduce nuts, seeds or seafood if prior Allergic Reaction (especially if history of Anaphylaxis)
            2. Mix with other foods
              • Eggs in baked products (instead of scrambled eggs)
              • Milk in Cheese or yogurt (instead of glass of milk)
            3. Do not reintroduce foods with previous Anaphylaxis
            4. Do not reintroduce foods with previous Anaphylaxis
              • Do not re-introduce nuts, seeds or seafood if prior Allergic Reaction (especially if history of Anaphylaxis)
              1. Fish Allergy
                1. Fish Allergy
                2. Avoid unused and saltwater fish
                3. Skin Testing for Influenza Vaccine reaction is not recommended due to high Untrue Positive Rate
                4. May be given if egg Allergic Reaction was limited to Urticaria (especially if tolerates egg containing foods)
                5. Consider monitoring for 2 hours after Vaccination
                6. Contraindicated Vaccines (if hives, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis to egg)
                7. Rabies Vaccine
                8. Avoid unlabeled candies and desserts
                9. Avoid ice cream parlors
                10. Nut allergy (often associated with Anaphylaxis)
                11. Do not eat at buffets
                12. Most fish-allergic patients can tolerate canned tuna
                13. Avoid butter or margarine containing milk
                14. Management
                15. Yellow Fever Vaccine
                16. Milk allergy
                17. Avoid not only cow’s milk, but also sheep and goat’s milk
                18. Egg Allergy and Vaccinations
                19. Indicated Vaccines regardless of egg allergy severity (these Vaccines contain only minute egg amounts)
                20. Measles Mumps Rubella Vaccine (MMR Vaccine)
                21. Possibly indicated Vaccines
                22. Influenza Vaccine
                23. Specific food Issues
                24. Varicella Vaccine
                25. Crustacean allergy
                26. Avoid every crustaceans (shrimp, lobster, crab)
              2. Egg Allergy and Vaccinations
              3. Indicated Vaccines regardless of egg allergy severity (these Vaccines contain only minute egg amounts)
                • Measles Mumps Rubella Vaccine (MMR Vaccine)
                • Varicella Vaccine
              4. Possibly indicated Vaccines
              5. Possibly indicated Vaccines
              6. Influenza Vaccine
              7. May be given if egg Allergic Reaction was limited to Urticaria (especially if tolerates egg containing foods)
                • Consider monitoring for 2 hours after Vaccination
                • Skin Testing for Influenza Vaccine reaction is not recommended due to high Untrue Positive Rate
              8. Contraindicated Vaccines (if hives, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis to egg)
              9. Contraindicated Vaccines (if hives, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis to egg)
                • Rabies Vaccine
                • Yellow Fever Vaccine
              10. Fish Allergy
              11. Fish Allergy
                • Avoid unused and saltwater fish
                • Most fish-allergic patients can tolerate canned tuna
              12. Nut allergy (often associated with Anaphylaxis)
              13. Nut allergy (often associated with Anaphylaxis)
                • Avoid unlabeled candies and desserts
                • Do not eat at buffets
                • Avoid ice cream parlors
              14. Milk allergy
              15. Milk allergy
                • Avoid not only cow’s milk, but also sheep and goat’s milk
                • Avoid butter or margarine containing milk
              16. Crustacean allergy
              17. Crustacean allergy
                • Avoid every crustaceans (shrimp, lobster, crab)
                1. Initial reaction (Sensitization)
                  1. Initial reaction (Sensitization)
                  2. IgE antibodies produced to food
                  3. Brazil nuts
                  4. Tree nuts
                  5. Pistachios
                  6. Fish
                  7. Safe alternative to skin test (Anaphylaxis suspected)
                  8. Short-term Elimination Diets
                  9. Diet diaries
                  10. Do NOT act out for food suspected of Anaphylaxis
                  11. Strategies to avoid (not effective or unsupported)
                  12. Maternal dietary restrictions during pregnancy and Lactation are not recommended
                  13. Attention-Deficit Disorder (ADD)
                  14. Myth: Attention Deficit Disorder related to dietary additives
                  15. Dietary Salicylates
                  16. Child under age 6
                  17. Epinephrine () mg SQ (Epi-Pen Jr)
                  18. Recommended strategies to prevent Food Allergy
                  19. Exclusive Breast Feeding until months of age
                  20. Cashews
                  21. Prostaglandins and leukotrienes are released
                  22. Reference
                  23. Lipton () J Am Diet Assoc [PubMed]
                  24. Crayfish
                  25. Milk allergy: 85% resolve by age 5 years
                  26. Food-induced Urticaria
                  27. Food allergies account for 30% of acute cases but rarely cause Chronic Urticaria
                  28. Nuts, fish, seed allergies persist
                  29. Children: %
                  30. Up to 15% of parents believe their children own Food Allergy, but most cases are unproven
                  31. Food dependent Exercise induced Anaphylaxis (rare)
                  32. Wheat is most common associated food trigger
                  33. Epinephrine Self-Injectors for home/school (Should own 2 pens available)
                  34. Child over age 6
                  35. Epinephrine () mg SQ (EpiPen)
                  36. Associated Conditions
                  37. Results in severe, sudden, Allergic Reaction (Urticaria, Anaphylaxis) to beef, lamb, pork
                  38. Anaphylaxis occurs only if specific food trigger ingested before Exercise
                  39. Mahan () Ann Allergy [PubMed]
                  40. Reality
                  41. Only 2% ADD Children would benefit from diet change
                  42. Oral Allergy Syndrome
                  43. Pecans
                  44. Reality
                  45. No proven relationships
                  46. Releases
                  47. Histamine
                  48. Macadamian Nuts
                  49. Lifelong Food allergies
                  50. Foods associated with systemic Anaphylaxis
                  51. Pine nuts
                  52. Sunflower seeds
                  53. Sucrose has «calming effect» when c/w Aspartame
                  54. Kruesi () Annu Rev Nutr [PubMed]
                  55. Reality
                  56. Sugar does not increase activity
                  57. Milich () Clin Psychol Rev [PubMed]
                  58. Walnuts
                  59. Solid food introduction by 6 months of age
                  60. Potentially allergenic foods may be introduced at this time
                  61. Indefinitely avoid causative food
                  62. Immediate Reacting IgE skin Test
                  63. Epicutaneous stick with Unused Food Extract
                  64. Atopic Dermatitis
                  65. Improves when eggs, milk and peanuts are removed from diet
                  66. Sugar «Allergy»
                  67. Myth: Refined sugars aggravate behavioral problems
                  68. Suggested to provoke hyperactivity, aggressive, inappropriate behavior
                  69. Sensitive and Specific
                  70. Lobster
                  71. Incidence of Food Allergy
                  72. Adults: %
                  73. Tick Bite (lone star tick) predisposes to Alpha-gal Reaction
                  74. Sensitization to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), found in both ticks and red meat
                  75. Caraway seeds
                  76. Peanut allergy: % (based on parent or self-report)
                  77. In-Vitro test for allergen-specific IgE Antibodies (RAST)
                  78. Less sensitive than skin test
                  79. Milk, eggs, wheat or soy allergies generally resolve
                  80. Egg allergy: 70% resolve by age 5 years
                  81. Conditions NOT associated with Food Allergy
                  82. Tree nut allergy: % (based on parent or self-report)
                  83. Subsequent Reaction
                  84. IgE fixed to Mast Cells in Skin, GI, Respiratory
                  85. Almonds (and marzipan)
                  86. Reacts to allergen
                  87. Family History of atopic disease (Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis)
                  88. Transient Food Allergies
                  89. Most food allergies final only a few years
                  90. Shellfish
                  91. Crab
                  92. Nuts (allergy often seen in Atopic Patients)
                  93. Peanuts (legume)
                  94. Prawns or shrimp
                  95. Open Food Challenge
                  96. Use for reintroduction of foods after years
                  97. For foods with less serious reactions
                  98. Example: Hives to milk or eggs
                  99. Artificial food colors and flavors
                  100. Feingold,
                  101. Space Exercise at least 6 hours after trigger food is ingested
                  102. Prevalence of most common specific food allergens
                  103. Milk Allergy: % (up to 6% in studies based on parent or self-report)
                  104. Bachorowski () Pediatrics [PubMed]
                  105. Abnormal Kid Behavior
                  106. Myths:
                  107. Hyperactivity, Insomnia, Anxiety (Shannon,)
                  108. Chemotactics attract Eosinophils
                  109. «Allergic Attention Fatigue Syndrome» (Rowe, )
                  110. Seeds
                  111. Sesame seeds
                  112. Seafood allergy: Up to % of adults (based on parent or self-report)
                  113. Hazelnuts or filberts
                  114. Egg Allergy: % (up to 1% in studies based on parent or self-report)
                  115. Soy baby formula substitution for cow’s milk baby formula is not recommended
                2. Abnormal Kid Behavior
                3. Myths:
                  • Hyperactivity, Insomnia, Anxiety (Shannon,)
                  • «Allergic Attention Fatigue Syndrome» (Rowe, )
                4. Reality
                5. Reality
                  • No proven relationships
                6. Attention-Deficit Disorder (ADD)
                7. Attention-Deficit Disorder (ADD)
                8. Myth: Attention Deficit Disorder related to dietary additives
                9. Dietary Salicylates
                10. Artificial food colors and flavors
                  • Feingold,
                11. Reality
                12. Reality
                  • Only 2% ADD Children would benefit from diet change
                13. Reference
                14. Reference
                  • Lipton () J Am Diet Assoc [PubMed]
                15. Sugar «Allergy»
                16. Sugar «Allergy»
                17. Myth: Refined sugars aggravate behavioral problems
                  • Suggested to provoke hyperactivity, aggressive, inappropriate behavior
                18. Reality
                19. Reality
                20. Sugar does not increase activity
                  • Milich () Clin Psychol Rev [PubMed]
                  • Mahan () Ann Allergy [PubMed]
                21. Sucrose has «calming effect» when c/w Aspartame
                22. Sucrose has «calming effect» when c/w Aspartame
                  • Kruesi () Annu Rev Nutr [PubMed]
                  • Bachorowski () Pediatrics [PubMed]
                23. Incidence of Food Allergy
                24. Adults: %
                25. Children: %
                  • Up to 15% of parents believe their children own Food Allergy, but most cases are unproven
                26. Prevalence of most common specific food allergens
                27. Prevalence of most common specific food allergens
                  • Seafood allergy: Up to % of adults (based on parent or self-report)
                  • Egg Allergy: % (up to 1% in studies based on parent or self-report)
                  • Milk Allergy: % (up to 6% in studies based on parent or self-report)
                  • Peanut allergy: % (based on parent or self-report)
                  • Tree nut allergy: % (based on parent or self-report)
                28. Family History of atopic disease (Atopic Dermatitis, Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis)
                29. Tick Bite (lone star tick) predisposes to Alpha-gal Reaction
                  • Sensitization to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), found in both ticks and red meat
                  • Results in severe, sudden, Allergic Reaction (Urticaria, Anaphylaxis) to beef, lamb, pork
                30. Nuts (allergy often seen in Atopic Patients)
                31. Peanuts (legume)
                32. Tree nuts
                  • Macadamian Nuts
                  • Almonds (and marzipan)
                  • Cashews
                  • Hazelnuts or filberts
                  • Brazil nuts
                  • Pecans
                  • Pine nuts
                  • Walnuts
                  • Pistachios
                  • Fish
                33. Fish
                34. Shellfish
                35. Fish
                36. Shellfish
                  • Crayfish
                  • Crab
                  • Prawns or shrimp
                  • Lobster
                37. Seeds
                38. Seeds
                  • Sunflower seeds
                  • Sesame seeds
                  • Caraway seeds
                39. Initial reaction (Sensitization)
                  • IgE antibodies produced to food
                40. Subsequent Reaction
                41. Subsequent Reaction
                42. IgE fixed to Mast Cells in Skin, GI, Respiratory
                43. Reacts to allergen
                44. Releases
                  • Chemotactics attract Eosinophils
                  • Histamine
                  • Prostaglandins and leukotrienes are released
                45. Immediate Reacting IgE skin Test
                  • Sensitive and Specific
                  • Epicutaneous stick with Unused Food Extract
                  • Do NOT act out for food suspected of Anaphylaxis
                46. In-Vitro test for allergen-specific IgE Antibodies (RAST)
                47. In-Vitro test for allergen-specific IgE Antibodies (RAST)
                  • Less sensitive than skin test
                  • Safe alternative to skin test (Anaphylaxis suspected)
                48. Open Food Challenge
                49. Open Food Challenge
                50. Use for reintroduction of foods after years
                51. For foods with less serious reactions
                  • Diet diaries
                  • Example: Hives to milk or eggs
                  • Short-term Elimination Diets
                52. Indefinitely avoid causative food
                53. Epinephrine Self-Injectors for home/school (Should own 2 pens available)
                54. Child over age 6
                  • Epinephrine () mg SQ (EpiPen)
                55. Child under age 6
                56. Child under age 6
                  • Epinephrine () mg SQ (Epi-Pen Jr)
                57. Oral Allergy Syndrome
                58. Food dependent Exercise induced Anaphylaxis (rare)
                  • Anaphylaxis occurs only if specific food trigger ingested before Exercise
                  • Wheat is most common associated food trigger
                  • Space Exercise at least 6 hours after trigger food is ingested
                59. Food-induced Urticaria
                60. Food-induced Urticaria
                  • Food allergies account for 30% of acute cases but rarely cause Chronic Urticaria
                61. Atopic Dermatitis
                62. Atopic Dermatitis
                  • Improves when eggs, milk and peanuts are removed from diet
                63. Transient Food Allergies
                64. Most food allergies final only a few years
                65. Milk, eggs, wheat or soy allergies generally resolve
                  • Egg allergy: 70% resolve by age 5 years
                  • Milk allergy: 85% resolve by age 5 years
                66. Lifelong Food allergies
                67. Lifelong Food allergies
                  • Foods associated with systemic Anaphylaxis
                  • Nuts, fish, seed allergies persist
                68. Recommended strategies to prevent Food Allergy
                69. Exclusive Breast Feeding until months of age
                70. Solid food introduction by 6 months of age
                  • Potentially allergenic foods may be introduced at this time
                71. Strategies to avoid (not effective or unsupported)
                72. Strategies to avoid (not effective or unsupported)
                  • Maternal dietary restrictions during pregnancy and Lactation are not recommended
                  • Soy baby formula substitution for cow’s milk baby formula is not recommended


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