What is allergy alert nkda

From the history we know that the cause of ‘s TIA’s is due to carotid artery stenosis. As previously mentioned, has numerous of the risk factors applicable to carotid artery disease and atheromatous plaque formation i.e. hypertension, history of smoking. Observations showed that ‘s blood pressure was stable at / ‘s heart rate was 80 bpm and regular no signs of atrial fibrillation as a possible cause of emboli. There was no evidence of anaemia from the general examination. Auscultation of the heart revealed an aortic stenosis which radiated to the carotid arteries. This is a possible site for cause of emboli, however mitral regurge is more commonly associated with production of emboli.

was on statins indicating that she had a high cholesterol level — a risk factor for carotid artery disease.

Carotid artery stenosis can be exacerbated by co morbid conditions such as chronic lung and cardiac disease. This is because the physiological changes associated with such conditions can also limit oxygenation to the brain and can result in cerebral ischaemia in patients who would otherwise tolerate even high-grade carotid stenosis [1]. ‘s aortic stenosis may therefore be exacerbating her carotid artery stenosis.


History Every relevant information gathered from the patient about the presenting illness, co-existing problems, current treatment, significant past medical history and the social and family background.

The patient’s view of the nature of the problem and their expectations for treatment.

Family History

‘s sister had Parkinsons Disease

No other significant family history

Presenting Complaint and History of Presenting Complaint

has a history of recurrent Transient Ischaemic Attacks having had approximately 7 TIA’s over a 5 year period. Each attack leaves with right arm weakness and expressive dysphasia which lasts for approximately 10 minutes and then returns to normal.

was referred to Mr in by her GP and has been under his care since.

Allergies

NKDA

Allergy to fish

Social History

lives alone in warden controlled accommodation in and has a call alarm in case of emergency. receives home assist once a week to assist with the home work and has her shopping delivered to her. requires a stick for walking and has an electric scooter for town shopping. is a retired school teacher. started smoking approx age 15 and stopped smoking at age 70 and has a 27 year pack history. stated that she will drink one glass of wine approximately 5 times week.

is hard of hearing.

Systems Review

Cardiovascular system

Systolic Murmur radiating to the carotids — Aortic Stenosis

Respiratory System

No significant findings

Gastrointestinal System

No significant findings

Genitourinary System

Mild incontinence and increase in frequency of micturition especially during the night — attributes this to ancient age and said that it was not a significant change.

Central Nervous System

stated that she often feels dizzy first thing in the morning but that this dizziness improves throughout the day.


Formulation of the patient’s problem(s) Encapsulate this in physical, psychological and social terms (the triple diagnosis)

is an independent 84 year ancient lady who has been admitted for an elective Left Carotid Endartectomy.

is a symptomatic case in the fact that she suffers from recurrent TIA’s due to emboli produced from the stenosed carotid. has expressed a definite desire not to be resuscitated if the need should arise during the operation. is not concerned about the operation but feels that if she arrests it is her time to go. understands why the operation is needed and is aware of the possible risks and benefits. Although the emboli produced from the carotid own not yet left with any permanent physical abnormality (the weakness in her correct arm has always recovered after her TIA) she is aware that there is risk of such an event occurring.

Socially, may need additional assist during her recovery period as she currently lives alone e.g. Daily home assist or intermediate care may be required after discharge from the to help with personal activities of daily living.


Management Use the framework of RAPRIOP to structure your proposed management. Refer to the guidelines to the writing of portfolio cases for the details of the issues to be addressed under each heading.

Referral and team working

was discharged from PACU to B2W for recovery and monitoring

said that she felt well in herself although she had had an episode of dizziness.

BP /95, Mr advised to monitor over the weekend

fainted again this morning — ?

bruising to the carotid sinus during surgery. However, has had problems fainting in the past and so these episodes are probably not a result of the surgery.

Plan — lying and standing blood pressures to determine if the problem is postural hypotension

General Observations:

Lying BP = /65, Standing BP = 79/45

Comment — normally the blood pressure rises when standing up as a result of increased venous return due to venoconstriction to maintain cerebral perfusion. ‘s BP dropped significantly on standing, indicating that her dizziness is due to postural hypotension. This may be a side effect of her medication for hypertension and will require monitoring by her GP.

Temp , HR 90bpm, stated that was suffering from constipation and so lactulose and senna were prescribed.

Plan — Urge to eat and drink, contact cardiologist to review

seen by cardiologist who suggested that had idiopathic postural hypotension. It was suggested that ‘s hypertensive medication be stopped and that should be kept under observation.

Reassurance and explanation

Reassure the patient — was advised that the operation would be performed on her left carotid artery even though this had less of a stenosis as this was the side responsible for her symptoms.

Prescription/medical intervention

Operative :

Left Carotid Endarterectomy

Local anaesthetic — patient did not tolerate clamps to carotid and immediately lost consciousness when arteries were clamped.

Consciousness returned on unclamping and operation therefore proceeded under general anaesthetic with a shunt sited in approximately 90 seconds. 10 cm incision was made and an atheromatous plaque was removed.

Post operative:

Post Operative Trans cranial Doppler — No emboli 30 minutes post op

Observation

PACU (post analgesic care unit):

() had an episode of fainting and produced a little quantity of vomit whilst in PACU. BP decreased but returned to / When on bed was awake and responsive. had a nasal cannula and face mask supplying oxygen.

Fluid In

Fluid out 27

Entire Fluid +

() had a comfortable night.

The nasal cannula and face mask were removed

O 2 sats = % on air

BP /

HR BPM

RR PM

There was no oozing from the wound, had a redivac drain in situ and 50ml of blood had been drained from the wound. In the morning had a strip wash during which she went pale and said that she felt feeble. then lost consciousness, her carotid pulses were assessed and her HR was found to be bradycardic.

was seen by Mr . When returned to bed her BP was /60 and her HR was 50 BPM. was istered mg Stemetil (IM) for nausea and vomiting.

Investigations

Comment — Raised creatinine and urea indicating reduced renal function or dehydration, Hb low indicating anaemia

Pre left carotid endartectomy check scan:

Transcranial Doppler Assessment and Carotid Ultrasound ()

Left Internal Carotid artery — moderate 2cm endless plaque with 58% stenosis

Correct Internal Carotid artery — moderate to severe 2cm endless plaque with 68% stenosis

Pre operatively the left siphon was monitored transorbitally for 30 minutes with no emboli detected.

Comment : Although the correct internal carotid artery showed a more significant stenosis than the left internal carotid artery, the decision was made to act out the endartectomy on the left artery as this was the side producing the emboli responsible for ‘s TIA’s. was informed about the results of her Doppler assessment and understood the reasons for performing the operation on the left side rather than the correct.

Advice and Prevention

was provided with TED stockings to prevent DVT formation. was informed about her discharge plan and was initially reluctant to accept the thought of additional assistance when she returns home, however she quickly changed her mind about this and was pleased that staff were trying to arrange an intermediate care bed assessment for her initial discharge.

‘s relative had managed to organise 1 week’s respite care in a local nursing home and was discharged from the .


Analysis of history The most likely single cause of the presentation, other possible causes and reasons for these choices. The findings to be looked for on physical examination to assist decide the cause.

Transient Ischaemic Attacks are generally caused by the passage of emboli through the cerebral circulation which interrupts blood flow to the brain. TIA’s may also be caused by a drop in cerebral perfusion due to dysrhythmia or decreased flow through stenosed carotid arteries due to atheroma formation.

Signs to glance for on examination would be an irregular heart beat and a bruit over the carotid arteries. If a carotid bruit is heard it is an unreliable guide to the severity of the stenosis. The main sources of emboli to the brain are thrombi and atheromatous plaques within the carotid or vertebral arteries or in the heart. Cardiac thrombi can happen due to atrial fibrillation which often occurs secondary to valvular heart disease. The patient may therefore own atrial fibrillation or auscultation may reveal signs of a heart murmur.

Transient Ischaemic attacks cause sudden loss of function (i.e. within seconds) and final for approximately mins (> 24 hours treated as a stroke). Hemiparesis and dysphasia are the two most common presenting symptoms of TIA’s,

others include:

Amaurosis Fugax — a sudden transient loss of vision in on eye due to the passage of emboli through the retinal arteries.

Transient Global Amnesia — episodes of amnesia lasting for several hours (presumed to be caused by posterior circulation ischaemia)

Differential causes for transient episodes could be syncope, postural hypotension (as a side effect of the medication takes for her hypertension although this is unlikely as the transient episodes would happen more frequently and would not be associated with hemiparesis or dysphagia), migraine, anaemia, focal epilepsy or hypoglycaemic attacks etc.

also has numerous of the risk factors applicable to carotid artery disease — raised cholesterol, hypertension, previous history of smoking, ancient age and limited mobility.


Physical examination Highlight the findings most relevant to your clinical problem solving by underlining them

General Examination

On examination was sitting in a chair and looked comfortable and alert. had a walking stick by the side of the bed, there was no sputum pot or urine pot.

There was no finger clubbing, palmar erythema, cyanosis of the fingers, leuchonychia or koilonychias. No mouth ulcerations, central cyanosis and no evidence of vitamin deficiencies. No lymphadenopathy.

Systems examination — information obtained from notes (patient requested not to be examined)



On (b)(6) , a spontaneous report by a registered nurse (rn) was received from a company rep regarding a pt who received an injection of restylane-l (cross-linked hyaluronic acid dermal filler with 0. 3% lidocaine). On (b)(6) , additional info was received from the infectious disease physician via fax.

Based on the info received, the case was upgraded due to unexpected severity. Medical history, the pt¿s skin type, and concomitant medications were not reported. The pt received an injection of restylane-l (volume injected and syringe size not reported) on an unk date to an unspecified site. Pre-procedure medications and add¿l procedures performed at the time of implantation were not reported. On an unk date, after the implantation, the pt experienced an unspecified adverse event. The lot number and expiration date for restylane-l were not reported. On (b)(6) , add¿l info was received from the nurse.

What is allergy alert nkda

The nurse further identified the pt as a (b)(6) female, but had no further info to provide. On (b)(6) , additional info was received from the pt. The pt was further identified as (b)(6). Medical history included an injection of botox (onabotulinumtoxina) on an unk date (reported as ¿in the past¿) to the forehead without problems, and was otherwise reported as ¿none. ¿ the pt¿s skin type was reported as ¿pale. ¿ concomitant medications included celexa (citalopram hydrobromide) and spironolactone. The pt received an injection of restylane-l (volume injected unk) from what was thought to be a 1 ml syringe on an unspecified date in (reported as ¿approximately (b)(6) ago¿ from the date of the report) to the nasolabial folds and lips via an unknown injection technique.

Pre-procedure medications included an unspecified topical numbing cream. No add¿l procedures were performed at the time of implantation. On an unspecified date in (reported as ¿5 weeks post injection¿), the pt developed tenderness and two facial abscesses on her correct nasolabial fold. On an unspecified date in , the pt went to an urgent care and was prescribed augmentin (amoxicillin and clavulanate) and prednisone orally for one week, after which her symptoms almost resolved. As soon as the prednisone was done, the pt¿s symptoms came back worse: the two abscesses came back and another one appeared on the correct side.

On (b)(6) , the pt went to the plastic surgeon, who aspirated about 2ml of blood out of the areas (there was no pus) and an unspecified ¿wound culture¿ of the area was performed. The pt was started on bactrim (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) orally. On (b)(6) , the pt developed swelling from the eye area below to the chin on her correct side; subsequently, she went to the emergency room. No treatment or diagnosis was provided; nothing was done.

On (b)(6) , the culture came back negative and the pt went back to the injecting nurse. The pt was started on augmentin mg twice daily, bactrim mg twice daily for 10 days, and a prednisone taper. The pt was referred to an infection control healthcare provider. As of (b)(6) , the pt¿s swelling was just around the abscess areas and was much improved. The pt planned to own a facial ultrasound that day. The lot number and expiration date for restylane-l were unknown. On (b)(6) , add¿l info was received from the injecting nurse and an evaluating nurse from the injecting clinic. Based on the info received, the following events were added: implant site nodule, purulent discharge, implant site erythema, implant site inflammation, and implant site warmth.

The injecting nurse confirmed that the pt received an injection of restylane-l from a 1 ml syringe on (b)(6) to the nasolabial folds (0. 3 cc to the correct nasolabial fold and 0. 2 cc to the left nasolabial fold) and the lips (volume injected not reported) via linear threading injection technique. Pre-procedure medications included topical lidocaine 25% cream. The evaluating nurse reported that she evaluated the pt on (b)(6) At the time of the eval, the pt¿s correct nasolabial fold area was not red or inflamed, but nodules could be palpated.

The pt was referred to a plastic surgeon for further eval. The evaluating nurse confirmed that the plastic surgeon had aspirated pus and blood from nodules in the correct nasolabial fold, the pt was placed on bactrim, and cultures were negative. On (b)(6) , the pt sent pictures to the evaluating nurse. The pictures showed increased correct nasolabial fold swelling, redness, and inflammation and the nodules were reported to be warm and tender.

On (b)(6) , the pt was aspirated for a second culture (results unk) by an unspecified health care provider. As of (b)(6) , the nurse had not observed the pt in any manner since (b)(6) and was unable to confirm the diagnosis of abscess. The status of the tenderness to the correct nasolabial fold was unk and the swelling from the eye area below to the chin on the pt¿s correct side had never been observed by the rn. No treatment had been provided by the injecting clinic and no follow-up with the injecting clinic was planned.

The pt was referred to an infectious disease physician for eval, but no details of an eval were known. The evaluating nurse¿s opinion of causality was that the treatment did not cause the reported events. It was further reported that the nurse ¿did not ponder the injections had anything to do with it; it was likely something from the hospital where the pt worked that stimulated something in the product to cause the reaction. It was not due to the injections, as it occurred 5 weeks after the injection; it was likely that she picked up something from the hospital where she worked.

¿ the evaluating nurse assessed the severity of the reported events as ¿moderate. ¿ the lot number and expiration date for restylane-l were unk, as the packaging had been discarded. On (b)(6) , add¿l info provided by the infectious disease physician was received via fax. Based on the info received, the event of injection site cellulitis was added. The events of injection site pain, implant site nodule, implant site swelling, implant site erythema, implant site inflammation, and implant site warmth were subsumed under injection site cellulitis. The event of purulent discharge was subsumed under implant site abscess.

The pt was further identified as a (b)(6). On (b)(6) , the pt presented to the infectious diseases physician via referral from a physician at the injecting facility and a plastic surgeon for eval of perioral cellulitis. Review of pt medications sure the following: augmentin / mg at 1 tablet twice daily, bactrim ds / mg at 1 tablet twice daily, prednisone 10 mg taper once daily (also reported as ¿stop date (b)(6) ¿). The pt¿s family medical history included arthritis. The pt¿s social history included no tobacco use, ¿no sniffing, and alcohol use. ¿ medical history included no known drug allergies (nkda). General review of symptoms by the pt was reported as skin: denied rash; lymph: denied lymph gland swelling; head, eyes, ears, nose, and throat (heent): denied audio-visual symptoms, sinus congestion, oral lesions, and throat discomfort; respiratory: denied cough, sputum, shortness of breath and wheezing; cardiovascular: denied chest pain, palpitations, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (pnd), and orthopnea; gastrointestinal: denied abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea; endocrine: denied hyperglycemic and hypoglycemic episodes; musculoskeletal: denied myalgias, arthralgias, and arthritis; and neurologic: denied headache, seizures, radicular pain, paresthesias, and weakness.

The pt¿s history of present illness (hpi) was reported as follows: a (b)(6) who underwent nasolabial fold injection with ¿restylane¿ (previously reported and confirmed as restylane-l by the injecting facility). The pt ¿did well¿ until an unspecified date in (b)(6) (reported as ¿until approx (b)(6) ago¿ from the date of the report), when she noticed acute swelling and tenderness on the correct side of her face. The pt denied any fever, chills, sweats, or any specific trauma. The left side of her face and lip had been unaffected. Initial treatment was reported to own included prednisone and augmentin. The pt noticed significant improvement over the next week, but it ¿flared back up¿ as she tapered her steroids, on (b)(6) , the pt was evaluated by the plastic surgeon and aspiration of a fluid pocket revealed no organisms with numerous red blood cells (rbc) and few polymorphonuclear leukocytes (pmn); preliminary cultures showed no growth.

What is allergy alert nkda

The pt¿s vital signs were as follows: blood pressure (bp) /70 mm hg, temperature 7 f, and heart rate (hr) 84 per minute. The pt¿s weight was (b)(6), height (b)(6), and body mass index (bmi) (b)(6). General examination was reported as general appearance: in no acute distress, well developed, and well nourished; head: normocephalic and atraumatic; eyes: pupils equal, circular, reactive to light and accommodation; ears: normal; nose: nares patent, no lesions, septum intact; oral cavity: mucosa moist; throat: clear; neck/thyroid: neck supple, full range of motion, no cervical lymphadenopathy; lymph nodes: no cervical adenopathy; skin: correct facial swelling with an indurated, erythematous, and tender region at the upper portion of her correct nasolabial fold.

Dimensions were approximately 2 cm in length by 1 cm in width and did not involve the nares. Oral examination was normal. The infectious disease physician¿s primary assessment was cellulitis and abscess of the face. The pt had post ¿restylane¿ injection inflammatory reaction. The aspiration revealed blood. This was an unusual presentation of a hematoma, specifically that tardy in onset. The infectious diseases physician suspected a possible abscess, which could own been a sterile abscess related to the chemical injection.

The previously prescribed augmentin at / mg orally twice daily was stopped and treatment included: bactrim ds / mg at 1 tablet orally twice daily for 10 days and augmentin / mg at tablet orally twice daily for 10 days. A prednisone taper was initiated at 20 mg to be taken with food or milk orally for 2 days, 10 mg twice daily for 3 days, and 10 mg each day until the pt returned in 1 week. The pt was instructed to boiling pack the face 3 times per day and to call if there was any worsening of her swelling or intolerance of her treatments. An ultrasound of the correct cheek was to be obtained on an unspecified date. On (b)(6) , an ultrasound (us) guided aspiration of the correct cheek fluid collection was performed for the facial abscess by the infectious diseases physician.

The pt was prepped and draped. Local anesthesia was obtained with 1% xylocaine (lidocaine) mixed with bicarbonate. Ultrasound was used to guide a 21 gauge needle, which was advanced into an elongated hypoechoic collection in the subcutaneous tissue of the correct cheek, which corresponded to the area of clinical abnormality. The collection measured 2. 1 x 0. 7x 1. 4 cm on pre-procedural sonography. The tip of the needle was centered within the process and an aspiration of a tiny quantity of purulent appearing material was aspirated.

The fluid was diluted in a little quantity of normal saline and was sent to the laboratory for aerobic and anaerobic culture. No immediate complications were encountered and the pt was dismissed. The impression noted was an apparently technically successful ultrasound-guided aspiration of a tiny quantity of purulent material from a correct facial abscess as described. On (b)(6) , the findings were discussed with the pt; she could follow up with the plastic surgeon. On (b)(6) , a certification by the healthcare provider for the family and medical leave act was completed by the infectious diseases physician who indicated that the approximate date the condition commenced was (b)(6) No overnight admission to a medical care facility was indicated.

Pregnancy was not indicated and the pt was not deemed unable to act out any of her occupation functions due to her condition. The pt was noted to require leave of work on (b)(6) (for appointment and outpatient surgery), and (b)(6) The infectious diseases physician¿s opinion of causality was that the pt had a post restylane injection inflammatory reaction. An abscess was suspected, which could own been sterile abscess related to the ¿chemical¿ injection.

What is allergy alert nkda

The infectious diseases physician did not offer a statement of severity. Add¿l info has been requested.

Of every the things we’re asked here at Lauren’s Hope, what to engrave on a medical ID is one of the most common. In general, we recommend engraving a few essential items:

FIRST NAME, Final NAME

MEDICAL CONDITION(S)

TREATMENT CONSIDERATION(S)

EMERGENCY CONTACT NUMBER 1

EMERGENCY CONTACT NUMBER 2

However, your medical ID is as unique as you are.

You own the chance to engrave what serves your needs best, and we’re here to assist with that. So if your engraving doesn’t fairly fit the typical mold above, that’s ok. Custom engraving gives you the liberty to make certain your medical ID is just correct for you.

Here are a few tips to assist you determine how to engrave your medical ID along with the “why” behind them and a few examples:

  • Add emergency contacts. If space allows, having two ICE (In Case of Emergency) contacts is ideal. We recommend preceding the phone numbers by the letters ICE and using cell phone numbers whenever possible.

    Using ICE helps reduce the engraving space needed for a phone number. For example, ICE: is much shorter than CALL HUSBAND JOSEPH CELL , which would require two lines of engraving. Using just ICE and the number would permit you to own two contacts listed in the same quantity of space.

  • List your medical condition(s). Listing your primary medical condition is simple if you only own one or two. But with more complicated groups of conditions or lengthy condition names, it can be a little harder to fit everything in. We recommend using common medical abbreviations to assist hold things thorough yet concise.

    Here’s a list of commonly engraved abbreviations.

    1. List your allergies and/or the fact that you own none. Listing your allergies helps first responders and ER personnel avoid exposing you to known allergens. For instance, if you’re allergic to corn, a standard dextrose IV would be dangerous because dextrose is derived from corn. If you’re allergic to gluten, some medications are off the table because they’re made with gluten as a binding agent. Latex and pain medication allergies are also extremely common considerations in trauma situations.

      Don’t own any allergies? Add “NKA” or “NKDA” for “No Known Allergies” or “No Known Drug Allergies” on your medical ID tag. This helpful piece of information can make treating you faster and easier.

    2. Clarify what you’re taking versus what you’re allergic to. Simply listing the name of a medication leaves room for interpretation as to whether you are taking or allergic to that drug. That is why we recommend listing, “ON GABAPENTIN” or “ALGY: GABAPENTIN” as opposed to simply, “GABAPENTIN.” Clarity here can save time and remove room for error.
    3. List your allergies and/or the fact that you own none. Listing your allergies helps first responders and ER personnel avoid exposing you to known allergens.

      For instance, if you’re allergic to corn, a standard dextrose IV would be dangerous because dextrose is derived from corn. If you’re allergic to gluten, some medications are off the table because they’re made with gluten as a binding agent. Latex and pain medication allergies are also extremely common considerations in trauma situations. Don’t own any allergies? Add “NKA” or “NKDA” for “No Known Allergies” or “No Known Drug Allergies” on your medical ID tag. This helpful piece of information can make treating you faster and easier.

    4. List your name. We highly recommend listing your full name, at least first and final.

      This is particularly significant if your emergency contacts are unreachable and emergency personnel need to attempt other avenues of reaching a family member. It is also beneficial if one of your emergency contacts is your doctor’s office. They need to know who you are before they can provide any information beyond what’s on your medical ID. Especially with medical IDs for kids, the name is so significant. While adults typically own photo ID to drop back on, kids don’t generally carry any form of identification. This is one reason we recommend medical ID jewelry as ICE IDs (In Case of Emergency IDs) for every kids regardless of medical conditions or lack thereof; it’s simply one more way to assist you and your kid be connected more quickly in an emergency.

    5. Clarify what you’re taking versus what you’re allergic to. Simply listing the name of a medication leaves room for interpretation as to whether you are taking or allergic to that drug.

      What is allergy alert nkda

      That is why we recommend listing, “ON GABAPENTIN” or “ALGY: GABAPENTIN” as opposed to simply, “GABAPENTIN.” Clarity here can save time and remove room for error.

    6. List your medications. If you own a major medical condition, odds are you are on medication. And as medications can own complications, reactions, contraindications, and cross-reactions, it’s extremely significant that first responders know what you’re taking before they treat you.

      This allows them to assist determine if your crisis has to do with something you’re taking in addition to helping them avoid giving a medication that could make things worse instead of better.

    7. Use wallet cards and phones as backup. There’s no harm in having a backup (or two!). Wearing your medical ID daily can assist protect you by providing your most significant, time-sensitive information. Having a wallet card with you and listing emergency contact information in your cell phone (some of which own native apps just for this purpose) can give you the space to provide additional information, such as medication dosages, more emergency contact numbers, insurance information, surgical history, and more.

      Lastly, if you simply own so much information that reviewing your wallet card is of primary importance, we recommend engraving, “SEE WALLET CARD” on your medical ID. EMTs report that this nudge can make the difference between your wallet being set aside until someone has time to glance at it in the hospital and it being located and your information accessed correct there on the scene.

    8. Pro Tip: Did you know? Most of our medical ID tags list a maximum of 20 characters, but some conditions, such as Adrenal Insufficiency, are just one character over.

      Not to worry. Use the “special instructions” field when you check out and enquire us to fit that additional character in. Or give us a call. We’re happy to work through some options to assist ensure your medical ID is as effective as possible for you.

    9. List your medications. If you own a major medical condition, odds are you are on medication. And as medications can own complications, reactions, contraindications, and cross-reactions, it’s extremely significant that first responders know what you’re taking before they treat you.

      This allows them to assist determine if your crisis has to do with something you’re taking in addition to helping them avoid giving a medication that could make things worse instead of better.

    10. Pro Tip: Own you had a gastric bypass or gastric sleeve surgery? While the name of your surgery and the month/year you had it are the correct items to list as conditions, adding your maximum fluid capacity along with, “NO BLIND NG/NSAIDS” can assist first responders treat you more safely.
    11. Use wallet cards and phones as backup.

      There’s no harm in having a backup (or two!). Wearing your medical ID daily can assist protect you by providing your most significant, time-sensitive information. Having a wallet card with you and listing emergency contact information in your cell phone (some of which own native apps just for this purpose) can give you the space to provide additional information, such as medication dosages, more emergency contact numbers, insurance information, surgical history, and more.

      Lastly, if you simply own so much information that reviewing your wallet card is of primary importance, we recommend engraving, “SEE WALLET CARD” on your medical ID. EMTs report that this nudge can make the difference between your wallet being set aside until someone has time to glance at it in the hospital and it being located and your information accessed correct there on the scene.

      What is allergy alert nkda

    12. List your treatment considerations. A condition is not the same as a treatment consideration. For instance, you may own listed, “Atrial Fibrillation,” or “Long QT Syndrome” as your chief condition. But if you own a pacemaker as a result of your heart condition, first responders need to know about this implanted device, which may mean you are unable to undergo certain common ER tests, such as an MRI. In this instance, we recommend listing, “PACEMAKER/NO MRI.” Likewise, if your chief conditions is Type 1 Diabetes, you may desire the additional treatment consideration of, “ON PUMP.” Particularly with newer, smaller devices allowing for non-traditional pump sites, it’s a grand thought to let EMTs know correct away that they need to go glance for your pump.

      1. Add emergency contacts. If space allows, having two ICE (In Case of Emergency) contacts is ideal. We recommend preceding the phone numbers by the letters ICE and using cell phone numbers whenever possible. Using ICE helps reduce the engraving space needed for a phone number. For example, ICE: is much shorter than CALL HUSBAND JOSEPH CELL , which would require two lines of engraving. Using just ICE and the number would permit you to own two contacts listed in the same quantity of space.

      2. Pro Tip:We do not recommend relying on USB drives with your medical information, as these are not only easily damaged by water and daily carrying but also highly unlikely to be accessed due to hospital data security protocols, which prevent staff from plugging in unknown devices.
  1. Pro Tip:We do not recommend relying on USB drives with your medical information, as these are not only easily damaged by water and daily carrying but also highly unlikely to be accessed due to hospital data security protocols, which prevent staff from plugging in unknown devices.

Tara Cohen

As Director of Sales, Marketing, and Trade Development for Lauren’s Hope, Tara Cohen is often the voice of Lauren’s Hope.

Whether she’s writing the Lauren’s Hope blog, crafting a marketing email, or describing a new product, Cohen brings a little personal touch to everything she creates.

Part of the LH team since , Cohen has spent years learning about various medical conditions and what engravings are most helpful for each.

In addition to her years of experience at Lauren’s Hope and every of the research she puts into writing for LH, Cohen draws on her own life experiences to bring a human touch to the LH blog.

Referral information Source of referral and a summary of key information

was admitted to hospital on for an elective left carotid endarterectomy

  1. Pro Tip:We do not recommend relying on USB drives with your medical information, as these are not only easily damaged by water and daily carrying but also highly unlikely to be accessed due to hospital data security protocols, which prevent staff from plugging in unknown devices.

Tara Cohen

As Director of Sales, Marketing, and Trade Development for Lauren’s Hope, Tara Cohen is often the voice of Lauren’s Hope.

Whether she’s writing the Lauren’s Hope blog, crafting a marketing email, or describing a new product, Cohen brings a little personal touch to everything she creates.

Part of the LH team since , Cohen has spent years learning about various medical conditions and what engravings are most helpful for each.

In addition to her years of experience at Lauren’s Hope and every of the research she puts into writing for LH, Cohen draws on her own life experiences to bring a human touch to the LH blog.

Referral information Source of referral and a summary of key information

was admitted to hospital on for an elective left carotid endarterectomy


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