What is allergies treatment

Robert S. Call, M.D.received his allergy training at the University of Virginia and remained on staff as an Instructor in Medicine for 2 years teaching and researching Asthma before moving to Richmond. Prior to his fellowship in Allergy, he did his Internal Medicine training at Michigan State University, Grand Rapids Campus. He is a Graduate of University of Virginia’s Medical School and School of Arts and Sciences where he received an MD and a BA in Biology.

Currently, Dr.

Call practices full time treating adults and children with allergies. His special interests include food allergy and exercise induced asthma. He also owns and is President of Clinical Research Partners(CRP), a clinical trial company. CRP performs clinical trials in allergy and other internal medicine related areas. In , he was appointed by the Governor of Virginia to the Commonwealth Health Research Board (CHRB) and was the Chair until CHRB provides funding to universities, hospitals and other facilities throughout the State of Virginia for research projects that benefit the citizens of Virginia.

Previously, Dr. Call served as the President of the Allergy and Asthma Society of Virginia, a 2 year post, and as President and Chairman of the Board of the Richmond Academy of Medicine.

Dr. Call’s favorite thing to do exterior of allergy is spending time with his wife, Mary, and his 4 lovely daughters.

AWARDS

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For several years running, Dr. Call has been named a Top Doc by Richmond Magazine.

At Carolina Asthma & Allergy Middle, we’re committed to providing the highest quality asthma and allergy care in North and South Carolina. To better serve both states, our Rock Hill location is located near the South Carolina border, making it easily accessible to South Carolina residents in Rock Hill, Fort Mill, and Lake Wylie as well as North Carolina areas such as Pineville.

We own five medical experts on hand at our Rock Hill office, including Natasha Laungani, FNP-C; S.

What is allergies treatment

Nicole Chadha, MD; Roopen R. Patel, MD; Susan I. Hungness, MD; and Glenn W. Errington, MD. Dr. Laungani, who is exclusive to our Rock Hill location, studied at the University of Kentucky and the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Errington specializes in children over two years ancient and adults. He received certifications through the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Allergy and Immunology.

You’ll discover our shot room at our Rock Hill office as well, which is open until p.m. on weekdays. This is for our allergy patients dealing with skin allergies, food allergies, insect allergies, and more.

Our patients who need allergy treatment or asthma treatment can set up an appointment for any day of the week until 5 p.m. with one of our specialists. The phone number for our Carolina Asthma & Allergy Middle, including our Rock Hill office, is

Or Contact Us

Please note: Due to healthcare privacy laws, we cannot answer any questions pertaining to personal health information by e-mail.

The DeMera Allergy Asthma & Immunology Center is committed to providing thorough, individualized care to every patient.

Unlike other centers, we won’t simply continue prescribing you medications until we discover one that works. We’ll take the time to diagnose you correctly, finding the root of your problem and treating it in the most effective way possible.


For allergy problems, you’ll be seen exclusively by Dr. Richard S. DeMera. Board-certified in internal medicine and allergy/immunology, Dr.

What is allergies treatment

DeMera is a Valley native who understands the unique problems faced by allergy and asthma sufferers in Central California.


For non-surgical ear, nose and throat, problems, or problems associated with sleep apnea, Dr. Bret E. Sherman, M.D., Ph.D.

What is allergies treatment

accepts consultations on a limited basis as an Associate with the DeMera Allergy Asthma & Immunology Middle. Board-certified in Otolaryngology and Sleep Medicine, Dr. Sherman is also a Fresno native, and continues to provide high-end, concierge-style medicine to his patients.


The specialist and staff at DeMera Allergy Asthma & Immunology Middle pride themselves on providing the best care possible. When you call our offices, well schedule your appointments without delay and answer your questions promptly.


Asthma and allergies affect thousands of people in the Fresno and Visalia areas. If you’re one of them, it’s time to stop suffering and start breathing clearly once again.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment.

Common symptoms of sinus infection include:

  1. Discolored nasal discharge (greenish in color)
  2. Coughing
  3. Fatigue
  4. Tenderness of the face (particularly under the eyes or at the bridge of the nose)
  5. Fever
  6. Nasal stuffiness or congestion
  7. Frontal headaches
  8. Postnasal drip
  9. Pain in the teeth
  10. Bad breath

Sinus infection (sinusitis) is often confused with rhinitis, a medical term used to describe the symptoms that accompany nasal inflammation and irritation. Rhinitis only involves the nasal passages. It could be caused by a freezing or allergies.

Allergies can frolic an significant role in chronic (long-lasting) or seasonal rhinitis episodes.

Nasal and sinus passages become swollen, congested, and inflamed in an attempt to flush out offending inhaled particles that trigger allergies. Pollen are seasonal allergens. Molds, dust mites and pet dander can cause symptoms year-round.

Asthma also has been linked to chronic sinus infections. Some people with a chronic nasal inflammation and irritation and/or asthma can develop a type of chronic sinusitis that is not caused by infection.

What is allergies treatment

Appropriate treatment of sinus infection often improves asthma symptoms.

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To schedule or update an appointment and general questions, please call

How is sinus infection diagnosed?

Diagnosis depends on symptoms and requires an examination of the throat, nose and sinuses. Your allergist will glance for:

  1. Redness
  2. Discolored (greenish) nasal discharge
  3. Tenderness of the face
  4. Swelling of the nasal tissues
  5. Bad Breath

If your sinus infection lasts longer than eight weeks, or if standard antibiotic treatment is not working, a sinus CT scan may assist your allergist diagnose the problem.

Your allergist may examine your nose or sinus openings. The exam uses a endless, thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera and a light at one finish that is inserted through the nose. It is not painful. Your allergist may give you a light anesthetic nasal spray to make you more comfortable.

Mucus cultures: If your sinus infection is chronic or has not improved after several rounds of antibiotics, a mucus culture may assist to determine what is causing the infection.

Most mucus samples are taken from the nose. However, it is sometimes necessary to get mucus (or pus) directly from the sinuses.

Knowing what helpful of bacteria is causing the infection can lead to more effective antibiotic therapy. A fungus could also cause your sinus infection. Confirming the presence of fungus is significant. Fungal sinus infection needs to be treated with antifungal agents, rather than antibiotics. In addition, some forms of fungal sinus infection – allergic fungal sinus infection, for example – do not reply to antifungal agents and often require the use of oral steroids.

Your allergist may consider ordering a sinus CT.

This test can assist to define the extent of the infection. Your allergist may also send you to a specialist in allergy and immunology. The specialist will check for underlying factors such as allergies, asthma, structural defects, or a weakness of the immune system.

Biopsies: A harm of more serious types of fungal sinus infection is that the fungus could penetrate into nearby bone. Only a bone biopsy can determine if this has happened. Biopsies involving sinus tissue are taken with flexible instruments inserted through the nose.

Biopsies of the sinus tissue are also used to test for immotile cilia syndrome, a rare disorder that can cause people to suffer from recurrent infections, including chronic sinus infection, bronchitis and pneumonia.

Itchy eyes, a congested nose, sneezing, wheezing and hives: these are symptoms of an allergic reaction caused when plants release pollen into the air, generally in the spring or drop.

What is allergies treatment

Numerous people use hay fever as a colloquial term for these seasonal allergies and the inflammation of the nose and airways.

But hay fever is a misnomer, said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat doctor and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

«It is not an allergy to hay,» Josephson, author of the book «Sinus Relief Now» (Perigee Trade, ), told Live Science. «Rather, it is an allergy to weeds that pollinate.»

Doctors and researchers prefer the phrase allergic rhinitis to describe the condition. More than 50 million people experience some type of allergy each year, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

In , % of adults and % of children reported own allergic rhinitis symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Worldwide, between 10 and 30% of people are affected by allergic rhinitis, Josephson said.

In , spring arrived early in some parts of the country and later in others, according to the National Phenology Network (NPN). Spring brings blooming plants and, for some, lots of sneezing, itchy, watery eyes and runny noses. According to NPN data, spring reared its head about two weeks early in areas of California, Nevada and numerous of the Southern and Southeastern states.

Much of California, for example, is preparing for a brutal allergy season due to the large quantity of winter rain. On the other hand, spring ranged from about one to two weeks tardy in the Northwest, the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic U.S. [Watch a Massive ‘Pollen Cloud’ Explode from Late-Blooming Tree]


Pollen count

How do scientists know how much pollen is in the air? They set a trap. The trap — generally a glass plate or rod coated with adhesive — is analyzed every few hours, and the number of particles collected is then averaged to reflect the particles that would pass through the area in any hour period.

That measurement is converted to pollen per cubic meter. Mold counts work much the same way.

A pollen count is an imprecise measurement, scientists confess, and an arduous one — at the analysis stage, pollen grains are counted one by one under a microscope. It is also highly time-consuming to discern between types of pollen, so they are generally bundled into one variable. Given the imprecise nature of the measurement, entire daily pollen counts are often reported simply as low, moderate or high.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology provides up-to-date pollen counts for U.S.

states.


Hay fever treatments

Dr. Sarita Patil, an allergist with Massachusetts General Hospital’s Allergy Associates in Boston, talked to Live Science about strategies for outdoor lovers with seasonal allergies.

Patil suggested figuring out exactly what type of pollen you’re allergic to, and then avoiding planning outdoor activities during peak pollinating times in the months when those plants are in bloom.

Numerous grasses, for example, typically pollinate in tardy spring and early summer and release most of their spores in the afternoon and early evening.

Her other strategies: Be capable to identify the pollen perpetrator by sight; monitor pollen counts before scheduling outdoor time; go exterior at a time of day when the plants that make you go achoo are not pollinating; and wear protective gear love sunglasses, among other tips. [7 Strategies for Outdoor Lovers with Seasonal Allergies]

Allergy sufferers may also select to combat symptoms with medication designed to shut below or trick the immune sensitivity in the body.

Whether over-the-counter or prescription, most allergy pills work by releasing chemicals into the body that bind naturally to histamine — the protein that reacts to the allergen and causes an immune response — negating the protein’s effect.

Other allergy remedies attack the symptoms at the source. Nasal sprays contain athletic ingredients that decongest by soothing irritated blood vessels in the nose, while eye drops both moisturize and reduce inflammation.

Doctors may also prescribe allergy shots, Josephson said.

For kids, allergy medications are tricky. A nationally representative poll of parents with kids between ages 6 and 12 found that 21% of parents said they had trouble figuring out the correct dose of allergy meds for their child; 15% of parents gave a kid an adult form of the allergy medicine, and 33% of these parents also gave their kid the adult dose of that medicine.

Doctors may also recommend allergy shots, a neti pot that can rinse the sinuses, or a Grossan Hydropulse — an irrigating system that cleans the nose of pollens, infection and environmental irritants, Josephson said.

Alternative and holistic options, along with acupuncture, may also assist people with hay fever, Josephson said.

People can also avoid pollen by keeping their windows closed in the spring, and by using air purifiers and air conditioners at home.

Probiotics may also be helpful in stopping those itchy eyes and runny noses. A review published in the journal International Forum of Allergy and Rhinology found that people who suffer from hay fever may benefit from using probiotics, or «good bacteria,» thought to promote a healthy gut. Although the jury is still out on whether probiotics are an effective treatment for seasonal allergies, the researchers noted that these gut bacteria could hold the body’s immune system from flaring up in response to allergens — something that could reduce allergy symptoms.

[5 Myths About Probiotics]

Additional resources:

This article was updated on April 30, , by Live Science Contributor Rachel Ross.


Symptoms

The symptoms of allergic rhinitis may at first feel love those of a freezing. But unlike a freezing that may incubate before causing discomfort, symptoms of allergies generally appear almost as soon as a person encounters an allergen, such as pollen or mold.

Symptoms include itchy eyes, ears, nose or throat, sneezing, irritability, nasal congestion and hoarseness.

People may also experience cough, postnasal drip, sinus pressure or headaches, decreased sense of smell, snoring, sleep apnea, fatigue and asthma, Josephson said. [Oral Allergy Syndrome: 6 Ways to Avoid an Itchy, Tingling Mouth]

Many of these symptoms are the immune system’s overreaction as it attempts to protect the vital and sensitive respiratory system from exterior invaders.

What is allergies treatment

The antibodies produced by the body hold the foreign invaders out, but also cause the symptoms characteristic of allergic responses.

People can develop hay fever at any age, but most people are diagnosed with the disorder in childhood or early adulthood, according to the Mayo Clinic. Symptoms typically become less severe as people age.

Often, children may first experience food allergies and eczema, or itchy skin, before developing hay fever, Josephson said. «This then worsens over the years, and patients then develop allergies to indoor allergens love dust and animals, or seasonal rhinitis, love ragweed, grass pollen, molds and tree pollen.»

Hay fever can also lead to other medical conditions.

People who are allergic to weeds are more likely to get other allergies and develop asthma as they age, Josephson said. But those who get immunotherapy, such as allergy shots that assist people’s bodies get used to allergens, are less likely to develop asthma, he said.


Tests & diagnosis

A physician will consider patient history and act out a thorough physical examination if a person reports having hay-fever-like symptoms.

If necessary, the physician will do an allergy test. According to the Mayo Clinic, people can get a skin-prick test, in which doctors prick the skin on a person’s arm or upper back with diverse substances to see if any cause an allergic reaction, such as a raised bump called a hive.

What is allergies treatment

[7 Strange Signs You’re Having an Allergic Reaction]

Blood tests for allergies are also available. This test rates the immune system’s response to a specific allergen by measuring the quantity of allergy-causing antibodies in the bloodstream, according to the Mayo Clinic.


Common allergens

The most common allergen is pollen, a powder released by trees, grasses and weeds that fertilize the seeds of neighboring plants. As plants rely on the wind to do the work for them, the pollination season sees billions of microscopic particles fill the air, and some of them finish up in people’s noses and mouths.

Spring bloomers include ash, birch, cedar, elm and maple trees, plus numerous species of grass.

Weeds pollinate in the tardy summer and drop, with ragweed being the most volatile.

The pollen that sits on brightly colored flowers is rarely responsible for hay fever because it is heavier and falls to the ground rather than becoming airborne. Bees and other insects carry flower pollen from one flower to the next without ever bothering human noses.

Mold allergies are diverse. Mold is a spore that grows on rotting logs, dead leaves and grasses. While dry-weather mold species exist, numerous types of mold thrive in moist, rainy conditions, and release their spores overnight.

During both the spring and drop allergy seasons, pollen is released mainly in the morning hours and travels best on dry, warm and breezy days.


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