What is a skin test for allergy

Your doctor can diagnose allergic reactions. If you experience symptoms of an allergic reaction, your doctor will act out an exam and enquire you about your health history. If your allergic reactions are severe, your doctor may enquire you to hold a journal that details your symptoms and the substances that appear to cause them.

Your doctor may desire to order tests to determine what’s causing your allergy. The most commonly ordered types of allergy tests are:

  1. challenge (elimination-type) tests
  2. skin tests
  3. blood tests

A skin test involves applying a little quantity of a suspected allergen to the skin and watching for a reaction.

The substance may be taped to the skin (patch test), applied via a little prick to the skin (skin prick test), or injected just under the skin (intradermal test).

A skin test is most valuable for diagnosing:

Challenge testing is useful in diagnosing food allergies. It involves removing a food from your diet for several weeks and watching for symptoms when you eat the food again.

A blood test for an allergy checks your blood for antibodies against a possible allergen. An antibody is a protein your body produces to fight harmful substances. Blood tests are an option when skin testing isn’t helpful or possible.


What causes an allergic reaction?

Doctors don’t know why some people experience allergies.

Allergies appear to run in families and can be inherited. If you own a shut family member who has allergies, you’re at greater risk for developing allergies.

Although the reasons why allergies develop aren’t known, there are some substances that commonly cause an allergic reaction. People who own allergies are typically allergic to one or more of the following:


How is an allergic reaction treated?

If you experience an allergic reaction and you don’t know what’s causing it, you may need to see your doctor to determine what the cause of your allergy is.

If you own a known allergy and experience symptoms, you may not need to seek medical care if your symptoms are mild.

In most cases, over-the-counter antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl), can be effective for controlling mild allergic reactions.

If you or someone you know experiences a severe allergic reaction, you should seek emergency medical attention. Check to see if the person is breathing, call 911, and provide CPR if needed.

People with known allergies often own emergency medications with them, such as an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen).

Epinephrine is a “rescue drug” because it opens the airways and raises blood pressure. The person may need your assist to ister the medication. If the person is unconscious, you should:

  1. Elevate their legs.
  2. Lay them flat on their back.
  3. Cover them with a blanket.

This will assist prevent shock.

Shop over-the-counter antihistamines for controlling mild allergic reactions.


What is the long-term outlook?

If you own a known allergy, preventing an allergic reaction will improve your outlook.

You can prevent these reactions by avoiding the allergens that affect you. If you own serious allergic reactions, you should always carry an EpiPen and inject yourself if symptoms happen.

Your outlook will also depend on the severity of your allergy. If you own a mild allergic reaction and seek treatment, you’ll own a excellent chance of recovery. However, symptoms may return if you come into contact with the allergen again.

If you own a severe allergic reaction, your outlook will depend on receiving quick emergency care. Anaphylaxis can result in death. Immediate medical care is necessary to improve your outcome.


Overview

Your immune system is responsible for defending the body against bacteria and viruses.

What is a skin test for allergy

In some cases, your immune system will defend against substances that typically don’t pose a threat to the human body. These substances are known as allergens, and when your body reacts to them, it causes an allergic reaction.

You can inhale, eat, and touch allergens that cause a reaction. Doctors can also use allergens to diagnose allergies and can even inject them into your body as a form of treatment.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) reports that as numerous as 50 million people in the United States suffer from some type of allergic disease.


How can you prevent an allergic reaction?

Once you identify your allergy, you can:

  1. Seek medical care if you’re exposed to the allergen.
  2. Avoid exposure to the allergen.
  3. Carry medications to treat anaphylaxis.

You may not be capable to avoid an allergic reaction completely, but these steps can assist you prevent future allergic reactions.

Heinzerling, L.

M., Burbach, G. J., Edenharter, G., Bachert, C., Bindslev-Jensen, C., Bonini, S., … Zuberbier, T. (2009). GA(2)LEN skin test study I: GA(2)LEN harmonization of skin prick testing: novel sensitization patterns for inhalant allergens in Europe. Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 64(10), 1498-506. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.02093.x

Heinzerling, L M ; Burbach, G J ; Edenharter, G ; Bachert, C ; Bindslev-Jensen, C ; Bonini, S ; Bousquet, J ; Bousquet-Rouanet, L ; Bousquet, P J ; Bresciani, M ; Bruno, A ; Burney, P ; Canonica, G W ; Darsow, U ; Demoly, P ; Durham, S ; Fokkens, W J ; Giavi, S ; Gjomarkaj, M ; Gramiccioni, C ; Haahtela, T ; Kowalski, M L ; Magyar, P ; Muraközi, G ; Orosz, M ; Papadopoulos, N G ; Röhnelt, C ; Stingl, G ; Todo-Bom, A ; von Mutius, E ; Wiesner, A ; Wöhrl, S ; Zuberbier, T.

/ GA(2)LEN skin test study I: GA(2)LEN harmonization of skin prick testing: novel sensitization patterns for inhalant allergens in Europe. In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2009 ; Vol. 64, No. 10. pp. 1498-506.

Heinzerling, LM, Burbach, GJ, Edenharter, G, Bachert, C, Bindslev-Jensen, C, Bonini, S, Bousquet, J, Bousquet-Rouanet, L, Bousquet, PJ, Bresciani, M, Bruno, A, Burney, P, Canonica, GW, Darsow, U, Demoly, P, Durham, S, Fokkens, WJ, Giavi, S, Gjomarkaj, M, Gramiccioni, C, Haahtela, T, Kowalski, ML, Magyar, P, Muraközi, G, Orosz, M, Papadopoulos, NG, Röhnelt, C, Stingl, G, Todo-Bom, A, von Mutius, E, Wiesner, A, Wöhrl, S & Zuberbier, T 2009, ‘GA(2)LEN skin test study I: GA(2)LEN harmonization of skin prick testing: novel sensitization patterns for inhalant allergens in Europe’, Allergy.

European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 64, no. 10, pp. 1498-506. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.02093.x

@article{e7c6a530b96e11deab49000ea68e967b,

title = «GA(2)LEN skin test study I: GA(2)LEN harmonization of skin prick testing: novel sensitization patterns for inhalant allergens in Europe»,

abstract = «BACKGROUND: Skin prick testing is the standard for diagnosing IgE-mediated allergies. However, diverse allergen extracts and diverse testing procedures own been applied by European allergy centres.

Thus, it has been hard to compare results from diverse centres or studies across Europe. It was, therefore, crucial to standardize and harmonize procedures in allergy diagnosis and treatment within Europe. AIMS: The Global Asthma and Allergy European Network (GA(2)LEN), with partners and collaborating centres across Europe, was in a unique position to take on this task. The current study is the first approach to implement a standardized procedure for skin prick testing in allergies against inhalant allergens with a standardized pan-European allergen panel.

What is a skin test for allergy

METHODS: The study population consisted of patients who were referred to one of the 17 participating centres in 14 European countries (n = 3034, median age = 33 years). Skin prick testing and evaluation was performed with the same 18 allergens in a standardized procedure across every centres. RESULTS: The study clearly shows that numerous allergens previously regarded as untypical for some regions in Europe own been underestimated. This could partly be related to changes in mobility of patients, vegetation or climate in Europe.

CONCLUSION: The results of this large pan-European study protest for the first time sensitization patterns for diverse inhalant allergens in patients across Europe. The standardized skin prick test with the standardized allergen battery should be recommended for clinical use and research. Further EU-wide monitoring of sensitization patterns is urgently needed.»,

author = «Heinzerling, {L M} and Burbach, {G J} and G Edenharter and C Bachert and C Bindslev-Jensen and S Bonini and J Bousquet and L Bousquet-Rouanet and Bousquet, {P J} and M Bresciani and A Bruno and P Burney and Canonica, {G W} and U Darsow and P Demoly and S Durham and Fokkens, {W J} and S Giavi and M Gjomarkaj and C Gramiccioni and T Haahtela and Kowalski, {M L} and P Magyar and G Murak{\»o}zi and M Orosz and Papadopoulos, {N G} and C R{\»o}hnelt and G Stingl and A Todo-Bom and {von Mutius}, E and A Wiesner and S W{\»o}hrl and T Zuberbier»,

year = «2009»,

month = «10»,

day = «1»,

doi = «10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.02093.x»,

language = «English»,

volume = «64»,

pages = «1498—506»,

journal = «Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology»,

issn = «0105-4538»,

publisher = «Wiley Online»,

number = «10»,

}

GA(2)LEN skin test study I: GA(2)LEN harmonization of skin prick testing: novel sensitization patterns for inhalant allergens in Europe. / Heinzerling, L M; Burbach, G J; Edenharter, G; Bachert, C; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bonini, S; Bousquet, J; Bousquet-Rouanet, L; Bousquet, P J; Bresciani, M; Bruno, A; Burney, P; Canonica, G W; Darsow, U; Demoly, P; Durham, S; Fokkens, W J; Giavi, S; Gjomarkaj, M; Gramiccioni, C; Haahtela, T; Kowalski, M L; Magyar, P; Muraközi, G; Orosz, M; Papadopoulos, N G; Röhnelt, C; Stingl, G; Todo-Bom, A; von Mutius, E; Wiesner, A; Wöhrl, S; Zuberbier, T.

In: Allergy.

European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 64, No. 10, 01.10.2009, p. 1498-506.

Research output: Contribution to journal › Journal article › Research › peer-review

TY — JOUR

T1 — GA(2)LEN skin test study I: GA(2)LEN harmonization of skin prick testing: novel sensitization patterns for inhalant allergens in Europe

AU — Heinzerling, L M

AU — Burbach, G J

AU — Edenharter, G

AU — Bachert, C

AU — Bindslev-Jensen, C

AU — Bonini, S

AU — Bousquet, J

AU — Bousquet-Rouanet, L

AU — Bousquet, P J

AU — Bresciani, M

AU — Bruno, A

AU — Burney, P

AU — Canonica, G W

AU — Darsow, U

AU — Demoly, P

AU — Durham, S

AU — Fokkens, W J

AU — Giavi, S

AU — Gjomarkaj, M

AU — Gramiccioni, C

AU — Haahtela, T

AU — Kowalski, M L

AU — Magyar, P

AU — Muraközi, G

AU — Orosz, M

AU — Papadopoulos, N G

AU — Röhnelt, C

AU — Stingl, G

AU — Todo-Bom, A

AU — von Mutius, E

AU — Wiesner, A

AU — Wöhrl, S

AU — Zuberbier, T

PY — 2009/10/1

Y1 — 2009/10/1

N2 — BACKGROUND: Skin prick testing is the standard for diagnosing IgE-mediated allergies.

However, diverse allergen extracts and diverse testing procedures own been applied by European allergy centres. Thus, it has been hard to compare results from diverse centres or studies across Europe. It was, therefore, crucial to standardize and harmonize procedures in allergy diagnosis and treatment within Europe. AIMS: The Global Asthma and Allergy European Network (GA(2)LEN), with partners and collaborating centres across Europe, was in a unique position to take on this task. The current study is the first approach to implement a standardized procedure for skin prick testing in allergies against inhalant allergens with a standardized pan-European allergen panel. METHODS: The study population consisted of patients who were referred to one of the 17 participating centres in 14 European countries (n = 3034, median age = 33 years).

Skin prick testing and evaluation was performed with the same 18 allergens in a standardized procedure across every centres. RESULTS: The study clearly shows that numerous allergens previously regarded as untypical for some regions in Europe own been underestimated. This could partly be related to changes in mobility of patients, vegetation or climate in Europe. CONCLUSION: The results of this large pan-European study protest for the first time sensitization patterns for diverse inhalant allergens in patients across Europe. The standardized skin prick test with the standardized allergen battery should be recommended for clinical use and research.

What is a skin test for allergy

Further EU-wide monitoring of sensitization patterns is urgently needed.

AB — BACKGROUND: Skin prick testing is the standard for diagnosing IgE-mediated allergies. However, diverse allergen extracts and diverse testing procedures own been applied by European allergy centres. Thus, it has been hard to compare results from diverse centres or studies across Europe. It was, therefore, crucial to standardize and harmonize procedures in allergy diagnosis and treatment within Europe. AIMS: The Global Asthma and Allergy European Network (GA(2)LEN), with partners and collaborating centres across Europe, was in a unique position to take on this task.

The current study is the first approach to implement a standardized procedure for skin prick testing in allergies against inhalant allergens with a standardized pan-European allergen panel. METHODS: The study population consisted of patients who were referred to one of the 17 participating centres in 14 European countries (n = 3034, median age = 33 years). Skin prick testing and evaluation was performed with the same 18 allergens in a standardized procedure across every centres. RESULTS: The study clearly shows that numerous allergens previously regarded as untypical for some regions in Europe own been underestimated.

This could partly be related to changes in mobility of patients, vegetation or climate in Europe.

What is a skin test for allergy

CONCLUSION: The results of this large pan-European study protest for the first time sensitization patterns for diverse inhalant allergens in patients across Europe. The standardized skin prick test with the standardized allergen battery should be recommended for clinical use and research. Further EU-wide monitoring of sensitization patterns is urgently needed.

U2 — 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.02093.x

DO — 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.02093.x

M3 — Journal article

C2 — 19772515

VL — 64

SP — 1498

EP — 1506

JO — Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

JF — Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

SN — 0105-4538

IS — 10

ER —

8.00 Skin Disorders

A.

What skin disorders do we assess with these listings?

We use these listings to assess skin disorders that may result from hereditary, congenital, or acquired pathological processes. The kinds of impairments covered by these listings are: Ichthyosis, bullous diseases, chronic infections of the skin or mucous membranes, dermatitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, genetic photosensitivity disorders, and burns.

B. What documentation do we need?

When we assess the existence and severity of your skin disorder, we generally need information about the onset, duration, frequency of flare-ups, and prognosis of your skin disorder; the location, size, and appearance of lesions; and, when applicable, history of exposure to toxins, allergens, or irritants, familial incidence, seasonal variation, stress factors, and your ability to function exterior of a highly protective environment.

To confirm the diagnosis, we may need laboratory findings (for example, results of a biopsy obtained independently of Social Security disability evaluation or blood tests) or evidence from other medically acceptable methods consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge and clinical practice.

C. How do we assess the severity of your skin disorder(s)?

We generally base our assessment of severity on the extent of your skin lesions, the frequency of flare-ups of your skin lesions, how your symptoms (including pain) limit you, the extent of your treatment, and how your treatment affects you.

1.

What is a skin test for allergy

Extensive skin lesions.

Extensive skin lesions are those that involve multiple body sites or critical body areas, and result in a extremely serious limitation. Examples of extensive skin lesions that result in a extremely serious limitation include but are not limited to:

a. Skin lesions that interfere with the motion of your joints and that extremely seriously limit your use of more than one extremity; that is, two upper extremities, two lower extremities, or one upper and one lower extremity.

b. Skin lesions on the palms of both hands that extremely seriously limit your ability to do fine and gross motor movements.

c. Skin lesions on the soles of both feet, the perineum, or both inguinal areas that extremely seriously limit your ability to ambulate.

2. Frequency of flare-ups.

If you own skin lesions, but they do not meet the requirements of any of the listings in this body system, you may still own an impairment that prevents you from doing any gainful activity when we consider your condition over time, especially if your flare-ups result in extensive skin lesions, as defined in C1 of this section.

Therefore, if you own frequent flare-ups, we may discover that your impairment(s) is medically equal to one of these listings even though you own some periods during which your condition is in remission. We will consider how frequent and serious your flare-ups are, how quickly they resolve, and how you function between flare-ups to determine whether you own been unable to do any gainful activity for a continuous period of at least 12 months or can be expected to be unable to do any gainful activity for a continuous period of at least 12 months. We will also consider the frequency of your flare-ups when we determine whether you own a severe impairment and when we need to assess your residual functional capacity.

3. Symptoms (including pain).

Symptoms (including pain) may be significant factors contributing to the severity of your skin disorder(s). We assess the impact of symptoms as explained in §§ 404.1521, 404.1529, 416.921, and 416.929 of this chapter.

4. Treatment.

We assess the effects of medication, therapy, surgery, and any other form of treatment you get when we determine the severity and duration of your impairment(s). Skin disorders frequently reply to treatment; however, response to treatment can vary widely, with some impairments becoming resistant to treatment. Some treatments can own side effects that can in themselves result in limitations.

a. We assess the effects of continuing treatment as prescribed by determining if there is improvement in the symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings of your disorder, and if you experience side effects that result in functional limitations. To assess the effects of your treatment, we may need information about:

i. The treatment you own been prescribed (for example, the type, dosage, method, and frequency of istration of medication or therapy);

ii.

Your response to the treatment;

iii. Any adverse effects of the treatment; and

iv. The expected duration of the treatment.

b. Because treatment itself or the effects of treatment may be temporary, in most cases sufficient time must elapse to permit us to assess the impact and expected duration of treatment and its side effects. Except under 8.07 and 8.08, you must follow continuing treatment as prescribed for at least 3 months before your impairment can be sure to meet the requirements of a skin disorder listing.

(See 8.00H if you are not undergoing treatment or did not own treatment for 3 months.) We consider your specific response to treatment when we assess the overall severity of your impairment.

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D. How do we assess impairments that may affect the skin and other body systems?

When your impairment affects your skin and has effects in other body systems, we first assess the predominant feature of your impairment under the appropriate body system.

Examples include, but are not limited to the following.

1. Tuberous sclerosis primarily affects the brain. The predominant features are seizures, which we assess under the neurological listings in 11.00, and developmental delays or other mental disorders, which we assess under the mental disorders listings in 12.00.

2. Malignant tumors of the skin (for example, malignant melanomas) are cancers, or neoplastic diseases, which we assess under the listings in 13.00.

3. Autoimmune disorders and other immune system disorders (for example, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and Sjögren’s syndrome) often involve more than one body system. We first assess these disorders under the immune system disorders listings in 14.00. We assess SLE under 14.02, scleroderma under 14.04, Sjögren’s syndrome under 14.10, and HIV infection under 14.11.

4. Disfigurement or deformity resulting from skin lesions may result in loss of sight, hearing, lecture, and the ability to chew (mastication). We assess these impairments and their effects under the special senses and lecture listings in 2.00 and the digestive system listings in 5.00. Facial disfigurement or other physical deformities may also own effects we assess under the mental disorders listings in 12.00, such as when they affect mood or social functioning.

E. How do we assess genetic photosensitivity disorders?

What is a skin test for allergy

1. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). When you own XP, your impairment meets the requirements of 8.07A if you own clinical and laboratory findings showing that you own the disorder. (See 8.00E3.) People who own XP own a lifelong hypersensitivity to every forms of ultraviolet light and generally lead extremely restricted lives in highly protective environments in order to prevent skin cancers from developing. Some people with XP also experience problems with their eyes, neurological problems, mental disorders, and problems in other body systems.

2. Other genetic photosensitivity disorders.

Other genetic photosensitivity disorders may vary in their effects on diverse people, and may not result in an inability to engage in any gainful activity for a continuous period of at least 12 months.

Therefore, if you own a genetic photosensitivity disorder other than XP (established by clinical and laboratory findings as described in 8.00E3), you must show that you own either extensive skin lesions or an inability to function exterior of a highly protective environment to meet the requirements of 8.07B.

You must also show that your impairment meets the duration requirement. By inability to function exterior of a highly protective environment we mean that you must avoid exposure to ultraviolet light (including sunlight passing through windows and light from unshielded fluorescent bulbs), wear protective clothing and eyeglasses, and use opaque wide spectrum sunscreens in order to avoid skin cancer or other serious effects.

Some genetic photosensitivity disorders can own extremely serious effects in other body systems, especially special senses and lecture (2.00), neurological (11.00), mental (12.00), and neoplastic (13.00). We will assess the predominant feature of your impairment under the appropriate body system, as explained in 8.00D.

3. Clinical and laboratory findings.

a. General. We need documentation from an acceptable medical source to establish that you own a medically determinable impairment.

In general, we must own evidence of appropriate laboratory testing showing that you own XP or another genetic photosensitivity disorder. We will discover that you own XP or another genetic photosensitivity disorder based on a report from an acceptable medical source indicating that you own the impairment, supported by definitive genetic laboratory studies documenting appropriate chromosomal changes, including abnormal DNA repair or another DNA or genetic abnormality specific to your type of photosensitivity disorder.

b. What we will accept as medical evidence instead of the actual laboratory report. When we do not own the actual laboratory report, we need evidence from an acceptable medical source that includes appropriate clinical findings for your impairment and that is persuasive that a positive diagnosis has been confirmed by appropriate laboratory testing at some time prior to our evaluation.

To be persuasive, the report must state that the appropriate definitive genetic laboratory study was conducted and that the results confirmed the diagnosis. The report must be consistent with other evidence in your case record.

F. How do we assess burns?

Electrical, chemical, or thermal burns frequently affect other body systems; for example, musculoskeletal, special senses and lecture, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, neurological, or mental.

Consequently, we assess burns the way we assess other disorders that can affect the skin and other body systems, using the listing for the predominant feature of your impairment. For example, if your soft tissue injuries are under continuing surgical management (as defined in 1.00M), we will assess your impairment under 1.08. However, if your burns do not meet the requirements of 1.08 and you own extensive skin lesions that result in a extremely serious limitation (as defined in 8.00C1) that has lasted or can be expected to final for a continuous period of at least 12 months, we will assess them under 8.08.

G. How do we determine if your skin disorder(s) will continue at a disabling level of severity in order to meet the duration requirement?

For every of these skin disorder listings except 8.07 and 8.08, we will discover that your impairment meets the duration requirement if your skin disorder results in extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed. By persist, we mean that the longitudinal clinical record shows that, with few exceptions, your lesions own been at the level of severity specified in the listing.

For 8.07A, we will presume that you meet the duration requirement. For 8.07B and 8.08, we will consider every of the relevant medical and other information in your case record to determine whether your skin disorder meets the duration requirement.

H. How do we assess your skin disorder(s) if your impairment does not meet the requirements of one of these listings?

1. These listings are only examples of common skin disorders that we consider severe enough to prevent you from engaging in any gainful activity. For most of these listings, if you do not own continuing treatment as prescribed, if your treatment has not lasted for at least 3 months, or if you do not own extensive skin lesions that own persisted for at least 3 months, your impairment cannot meet the requirements of these skin disorder listings.

(This provision does not apply to 8.07 and 8.08.) However, we may still discover that you are disabled because your impairment(s) meets the requirements of a listing in another body system or medically equals the severity of a listing. (See §§ 404.1526 and 416.926 of this chapter.) We may also discover you disabled at the final step of the sequential evaluation process.

2. If you own not received ongoing treatment or do not own an ongoing relationship with the medical community despite the existence of a severe impairment(s), or if your skin lesions own not persisted for at least 3 months but you are undergoing continuing treatment as prescribed, you may still own an impairment(s) that meets a listing in another body system or that medically equals a listing.

If you do not own an impairment(s) that meets or medically equals a listing, we will assess your residual functional capacity and proceed to the fourth and, if necessary, the fifth step of the sequential evaluation process in §§ 404.1520 and 416.920 of this chapter. When we decide whether you continue to be disabled, we use the rules in §§ 404.1594 and 416.994 of this chapter.

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8.01 Category of Impairments, Skin Disorders

8.02 Ichthyosis, with extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

8.03 Bullous disease (for example, pemphigus, erythema multiforme bullosum, epidermolysis bullosa, bullous pemphigoid, dermatitis herpetiformis), with extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed. .

8.04 Chronic infections of the skin or mucous membranes, with extensive fungating or extensive ulcerating skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

8.05 Dermatitis (for example, psoriasis, dyshidrosis, atopic dermatitis, exfoliative dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis), with extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

8.06 Hidradenitis suppurativa, with extensive skin lesions involving both axillae, both inguinal areas or the perineum that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

8.07 Genetic photosensitivity disorders, established as described in 8.00E.

A. Xeroderma pigmentosum. Consider the individual disabled from birth.

B.

What is a skin test for allergy

Other genetic photosensitivity disorders, with:

1. Extensive skin lesions that own lasted or can be expected to final for a continuous period of at least 12 months,

OR

2. Inability to function exterior of a highly protective environment for a continuous period of at least 12 months (see 8.00E2).

8.08Burns, with extensive skin lesions that own lasted or can be expected to final for a continuous period of at least 12 months (see 8.00F).

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What are the symptoms of an allergic reaction?

The symptoms of an allergic reaction can vary from mild to severe.

If you become exposed to an allergen for the first time, your symptoms may be mild. These symptoms may get worse if you repeatedly come into contact with the allergen.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  1. hives (itchy red spots on the skin)
  2. rash
  3. itching
  4. nasal congestion (known as rhinitis)
  5. scratchy throat
  6. watery or itchy eyes

Severe allergic reactions can cause the following symptoms:

  1. diarrhea
  2. swelling of the face, eyes, or tongue
  3. pain or tightness in the chest
  4. flushing of the face
  5. fear or anxiety
  6. weakness
  7. abdominal cramping or pain
  8. wheezing
  9. difficulty breathing
  10. heart palpitations
  11. nausea or vomiting
  12. dizziness (vertigo)
  13. difficulty swallowing
  14. unconsciousness

A severe and sudden allergic reaction can develop within seconds after exposure to an allergen.

This type of reaction is known as anaphylaxis and results in life-threatening symptoms, including swelling of the airway, inability to breathe, and a sudden and severe drop in blood pressure.

If you experience this type of allergic reaction, seek immediate emergency assist. Without treatment, this condition can result in death within 15 minutes.


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