What helps swollen eyes due to allergies

Allergic

Viral

Bacterial

Primary Complaints   

Itching, often severe    

Burning, irritation, discomfort

Irritation

Tearing

Moderate

Profuse

Moderate

Discharge

Minimal, pinkish or milky

Minimal

Profuse, whitish purulent

Redness

Generalized

Generalized

Generalized

Other Findings

Nasal and/or chest symptoms  

Occasional sore throat and fever  

Occasional lid swelling


Causes of swollen eyes

There are numerous causes of swollen eyelids — ranging from mild to potentially sight-threatening conditions.

Allergies: Eye allergies happen when your immune system overreacts to a foreign substance, called an allergen.

Pollen, dust, pet dander, certain eye drops and contact lens solutions are some of the most common eye allergens. An allergic reaction to makeup also is a known culprit of swollen eyes.

Eye allergies develop when your eyes release chemical "mediators" to protect your eyes from allergens to which you are sensitive.

The most common is histamine, which causes blood vessels in your eyes to dilate and swell, mucous membranes to itch and your eye to become red and watery.

Conjunctivitis: Also called "pink eye

Do your eyes glance puffy or swollen?

What helps swollen eyes due to allergies

When fluid builds up in the thin layers of tissue surrounding your eyes, your eyes and eyelids can swell. But when is it cause for concern?

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Typically, eye swelling in your upper or lower eyelid is just an uncomfortable annoyance that will go away on its own within a day.

But if the swelling lasts longer, it’s significant to treat it because some problems can quickly damage your eyes.

“Any swelling that lasts longer than 24 to 48 hours should send you to an eye care professional because there are times it can be something severe that can blind you,” says ophthalmologist Annapurna Singh, MD.

There are several reasons why you might see swelling in your eyes or eyelids. They include:

Allergies – This is a common problem that is also the simplest to treat.

These can be due to hay fever or a reaction to foods, chemicals or other irritants.

Conjunctivitis – Also known as pink eye, this infection is common during freezing and flu season. It’s often caused by a virus, bacteria, allergens or other irritants.

Stye – An infection in an eyelash follicle or tear gland, styes appears as tender, red bumps at the edge of your eyelids.

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Chalazion – Similar to a stye, a chalazion is a harmless, little bump that appears on your eyelid.

Blocked oil glands cause chalazia.

Orbital cellulitis – This inflammation, which spreads from your sinuses, occurs more often in children than in adults. It causes redness and painful swelling of your eyelid and the skin surrounding your eyes.

Trauma-related injuries – When blunt force strikes, your eye compresses and retracts, causing blood to collect underneath the damaged area.

What helps swollen eyes due to allergies

This often causes swelling and discoloration.

Graves disease – Also known as thyroid eye disease, Graves disease is an autoimmune condition that causes inflammation of your eye. It relates to a thyroid problem.

Eye cancer – This is rarely the reason for swelling in or around your eyes. However, it is a symptom.

What helps swollen eyes due to allergies

Eye cancer, or an eye lymphoma, is also accompanied by blurred vision or loss of vision. You may also see floaters — spots or squiggles — slowly moving in your field of vision.

Most swelling around the eyes goes away within a few days. Here are a few tips to assist reduce swelling in the meantime:

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  • Itchy watery eyes
  • Carotid artery disease.
  • Try a cool compress. Lie below and put a water-soaked washcloth across your eyes.
  • Diabetes.
  • Remove contacts.

    If you wear contact lenses, remove them immediately if your eyes or eyelids are swollen.

  • Eyelid problems
  • Wash or rinse. Attempt rinsing your eyes with water if swelling is associated with a discharge. Cool water is more soothing for allergies.
  • Antihistamine eye drops for allergies. Use antihistamine eye drops — but only if you own allergies. When it comes to steroid drops, Dr. Singh warns not to use them inadvertently and only as prescribed. “Steroid eye drops can work extremely well when you own allergies; however, if it’s used for another condition, it could actually harm and blind you,” she says.

    “Always, check with your physician first.”

  • Dark circles around eyes
  • Dry eyes
  • Lymphoma.
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS).
  • High blood pressure.
  • Reactions to Contacts

Signs of a more serious problem

Call your eye doctor correct away if swelling lasts longer than 24 to 48 hours and you notice any of the following:

Long-term eye care

To ensure that your eyes remain healthy, regular eye exams are a excellent thought — whether or not you’ve experienced swelling in your eyes, Dr.

Singh says.

“One of the reasons to own regular eye exams is to check for glaucoma, which can slowly damage the optic nerve – and for an early cataract, which clouds the lens in the eye and also affects your vision,” she says.

An eye exam can also reveal signs of systemic diseases, including:

  1. Carotid artery disease.
  2. High blood pressure.
  3. Diabetes.
  4. Multiple sclerosis (MS).
  5. Lymphoma.

If you are under the age of 40, Dr.

Singh recommends seeing an eye doctor every four or five years. After age 40, see your eye doctor every two or three years. Anyone who is age 50 or older should visit their eye doctor once a year, she says

“If you follow these guidelines, your eye doctor can assist to discover conditions that you might otherwise miss,” she says.

Eye Allergies

People with eye allergies typically own symptoms that include:

  1. Dry eyes
  2. Eyelid problems
  3. Itchy watery eyes
  4. Dark circles around eyes
  5. Reactions to Contacts

Let us assist permit you to see and glance better!

Signs of a more serious problem

Call your eye doctor correct away if swelling lasts longer than 24 to 48 hours and you notice any of the following:

Long-term eye care

To ensure that your eyes remain healthy, regular eye exams are a excellent thought — whether or not you’ve experienced swelling in your eyes, Dr.

Singh says.

“One of the reasons to own regular eye exams is to check for glaucoma, which can slowly damage the optic nerve – and for an early cataract, which clouds the lens in the eye and also affects your vision,” she says.

An eye exam can also reveal signs of systemic diseases, including:

  1. Carotid artery disease.
  2. High blood pressure.
  3. Diabetes.
  4. Multiple sclerosis (MS).
  5. Lymphoma.

If you are under the age of 40, Dr.

What helps swollen eyes due to allergies

Singh recommends seeing an eye doctor every four or five years. After age 40, see your eye doctor every two or three years. Anyone who is age 50 or older should visit their eye doctor once a year, she says

“If you follow these guidelines, your eye doctor can assist to discover conditions that you might otherwise miss,” she says.

Eye Allergies

People with eye allergies typically own symptoms that include:

  1. Dry eyes
  2. Eyelid problems
  3. Itchy watery eyes
  4. Dark circles around eyes
  5. Reactions to Contacts

Let us assist permit you to see and glance better!


Allergic Conjunctivitis: Eye Allergies

Allergic conjunctivitis is a common allergic problem involving the conjunctiva of the eyes.

It is most frequently associated with symptoms of itchy watery eyes often occurring during the allergy seasons. Repeatedly rubbing the eyes perpetuates the itchy feeling and creates a repetitive cycle of infection.

Allergic conjunctivitis may be seasonal, affecting you based upon changing concentrations of seasonal pollen. Symptoms may also be perennial when exposure to allergens such as dust mites, indoor molds or pet dander is year circular. Symptoms may also be episodic, for example after occasional exposure to a pet.

Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is the most common allergic disease involving the eye.

Eye allergies can be severe and fairly intolerable but not dangerous since they do not cause any permanent damage to the eye.

What helps swollen eyes due to allergies

The disease generally is self limiting with avoidance of the allergen. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis occurs more frequently than perennial allergic conjunctivitis.

What helps swollen eyes due to allergies

Symptoms typically happen in spring and drop depending on your specific sensitivities and the time and extent of pollen exposure.

Perennial allergic conjunctivitis typically results from exposure to dust mites, animal dander, and/or mold or other allergens that are present year circular in home or work environments. Because of constant exposure to these allergens, symptoms are year circular and similar to the symptoms of the seasonal condition. However, they may wax and wane depending on indoor allergen concentrations.

If you suffer from eye allergies, you may develop dark discoloration or circles under your eyes often called “allergic shiners.”  You may complain of fullness in your eyes or perhaps a burning sensation.

The eyes often tear and may become swollen or even swell shut in severe cases. Your eyes may be red or not even glance that bad even though the itching is fairly severe. You may complain of intolerance to bright lights (photophobia) or occasionally own blurred vision.

What helps swollen eyes due to allergies

When symptoms are severe, the need to rub your eyes may become overwhelming because of the intense itching.


Symptoms of swollen eyes

Swelling of the eyelids is a symptom of an underlying cause, such as allergy or infection. Swollen eyes generally are accompanied by one or more of the following:

A swollen eyelid may be a symptom of allergies or a sign of a serious eye infection.

  1. Eyelid dryness or flaking
  2. Excess tear production, resulting in watering eyes
  3. Eye irritation, such as an itchy or scratchy sensation
  4. Redness of the eyelid
  5. Obstructed vision (depending on the extent of the swelling)
  6. Eye discharge
  7. Sensitivity to light (photophobia)
  8. Red eyes and inflammation of the conjunctiva
  9. Pain, particularly when swollen eyelids are caused by infection

Puffy vs.

swollen eyes. The term "puffy eyes" often is interchangeable with "swollen eyes." Swollen eyes is generally used to describe an immune response to allergy, infection or injury, whereas "puffy eyes" is more likely used to refer to the external physical characteristic of swollen eyes from water retention, lack of sleep, or genetic traits love dark circles under the eyes.


Eye Anatomy: What Do Eye Allergies Actually Effect?

The eye is commonly involved in allergic reactions.

The conjunctiva is the part of the eye that is most frequently affected during common allergic reactions involving airborne allergens.

What helps swollen eyes due to allergies

The conjunctiva consists of a clear membrane covering the white of the eye and the inside of the eyelid. It begins at the eyelid edge and covers the inside of the eyelid, including most of the white of the eye (sclera) up to the limbus. The limbus is the point where the conjunctiva ends and the cornea begins. The cornea is the  most outer portion of the eye, and it is made out of a tough transparent tissue that is needed for vision. For a finish view of the eye anatomy, see Figure above.

The conjunctiva is loose tissue, wealthy in fluids, blood vessels and cells. Some of the cells love mast cells are wealthy in chemical mediators (histamines) involved in allergic reactions. Bound to the mast cell surface are hundreds of thousands of IgE  antibodies which can attach to allergens such as pollen, dust mite and animal dander. When airborne allergens contact the conjunctiva, they can attach to IgE antibodies on the mast cell surface, triggering an allergic reaction in the eye. Once mediators are released from mast cells, the conjunctiva blood vessels reply by opening and leaking fluids.

The eye becomes red, inflamed, swollen and extremely itchy.

Allergic conditions of the eyes or tissue around the eyes include the following:

  1. Giant papillary conjunctivitis
  2. Atopic keratoconjunctivitis
  3. Allergic conjunctivitis (seasonal or perennial)
  4. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis
  5. Allergic conditions involving the eyelid include contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis


Non-Allergic Eye Conditions

Non-Allergic conditions need to be considered and ruled out before final diagnosis of allergic conjunctivitis is made.

Among these considerations are:

  1. Atopic dermatitis
  2. Overuse of eye medications (topical decongestants used to “get the red out”) can cause red, irritated eyes even after every allergic or other symptoms own resolved; in this case, the treatment actually causes the disease
  3. Dry eyes which can cause red itch or burning sensation in the eye as if there is a foreign particle present (and watery eyes as overcompensation for dryness)
  4. Contact lens related problems
  5. Cosmetic or other contact allergy of the eyelids
  6. Work environment and hobbies-nonspecific air pollution from work or hobbies can cause irritated, red, watery, burning or stinging eyes
  7. Presence of a foreign body/particle
  8. Medication induced conjunctivitis
  9. Eye or Eyelid Infections: Eye infections may be hard to exclude early in the development of eye symptoms since they may be similar to that of allergy.

    Eye infections generally start in one eye at a time, while allergy generally affects both eyes at the same time. The discharge from an infected eye may start as clear but often becomes cloudy or discolored with time. In contrast allergic conjunctivitis is always associated with a clear discharge. Eye infections may be associated with swelling or tenderness of the little lymph nodes in front of the ear while this is not observed in allergic conjunctivitis.


How to avoid swollen eyelids

By Aimee Rodrigues; reviewed by Gary Heiting, OD

A swollen eyelid occurs when there is inflammation or excess fluid (edema) in the connective tissues surrounding the eye.

Swollen eyes may or may not be painful, and the condition can affect both the upper and lower eyelids.

There are numerous causes of a swollen eye, including eye infections, eye injuries or trauma, and (most commonly)

allergies

.

Swelling of the eyelids can be a sign of a more serious, potentially sight-threatening health problem, such as

orbital cellulitis

,

Graves' disease

and

ocular herpes

.

It's significant that you visit your eye doctor for a thorough eye exam if your symptoms persist, worsen or change.

FIND A DOCTOR: If you own just moved or it's been a while since your final exam, find an eye doctor near you.


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