What foods should be avoided with a latex allergy

Natural rubber latex is known to cause allergic reactions of Type I (e.g. anaphylaxis) and Type IV (e.g. allergic contact dermatitis) as well as non-allergic irritant contact dermatitis.

Type I

The most serious and rare form of latex allergy, Type I hypersensitivity can cause an immediate and potentially life-threatening reaction, not unlike the severe reaction some people own to bee stings. Such reactions account for a significant proportion of perioperativeanaphylactic reaction, especially in children with myelomeningocele.[4][5] Type I natural rubber latex allergy is an IgE (immune) mediated reaction to proteins found in the Hevea brasiliensis tree, a type of rubber tree.

Testing for type I natural rubber latex allergy is through blood testing to determine if the patient is producing IgE antibodies to latex proteins.

Anaphylactic shock can be provoked in allergic persons by the previous use of latex in an area: latex is typically powdered to prevent sticking, latex proteins become attached to the particles of powder, and the powder becomes airborne when the latex item is used, triggering potentially life-threatening Type I reactions when the latex-contaminated powder is inhaled by susceptible persons.[6] In radiological units latex allergy may mimic contrast medium allergy[7]

Irritant contact dermatitis

Natural rubber latex can also cause irritant contact dermatitis,[10] a less severe form of reaction that does not involve the immune system.

Contact dermatitis causes dry, itchy, irritated areas on the skin, most often on the hands.[11] Latex-glove induced dermatitis increases the chance of hospital-acquired infections, including blood-borne infections, being transmitted.[12]

Type IV (allergic contact dermatitis)

Type IV allergy, also known as allergic contact dermatitis, involves a delayed skin rash that is similar to poison ivy with blistering and oozing of the skin (see urushiol-induced contact dermatitis). It can be diagnosed through a positive skin patch test, although a negative test does not law out a latex allergy.[8] Severe irritation takes put if a latex catheter is inserted in the urinary tract of a person allergic to latex.

That is especially severe in case of a radical prostatectomy due to the open wound there and the exposure lasting e.g. two weeks. Intense pain may indicate such situation.[9]

Latex-fruit syndrome

People who own latex allergy also may own or develop an allergic response to some plants and/or products of these plants such as fruits. This is known as the latex-fruit syndrome.[13] Fruits (and seeds) involved in this syndrome include banana, pineapple, avocado, chestnut, kiwi fruit, mango, passionfruit, fig, strawberry, papaya, apple, melon, celery, potato, tomato, carrot, and soy.

Some, but not every of these fruits contain a form of latex. Hevein-like protein domains [14] are a possible cause for allergen cross-reactivity between latex and banana[15] or fruits in general.[16]

Natural rubber latex contains several conformational epitopes located on several enzymes such as Hev b 1,[17]Hev b 2,[18]Hev b 4,[19]Hev b 5[20] and Hev b .[21][22]

FITkit is a latex allergen testing method for quantification of the major natural rubber latex (NRL) specific allergens: Hev b 1, Hev b 3, Hev b 5, and Hev b [23]


External links

  • ^ abLatex Allergy at eMedicine
  • Carrot
  • Cell-mediated contact dermatitis (Type IV)
  • tourniquets
  • Come in contact with a mucous membrane such as the mouth
  • Melons
  • ^Banta, JV; Bonanni, C; Prebluda, J ().

    «Latex anaphylaxis during spinal surgery in children with myelomeningocele». Developmental Medicine and Kid Neurology. 35 (6): –8. doi/jtbx. PMID

  • dishwashing gloves
  • Bandages
  • ^Rendeli, C.; Nucera, E.; Ausili, E.; Tabacco, F.; Roncallo, C.; Pollastrini, E.; Scorzoni, M.; Schiavino, D.; Caldarelli, M.; Pietrini, D.; Patriarca, G. (). «Latex sensitisation and allergy in children with myelomeningocele».

    Child’s Nervous System. 22 (1): 28– doi/s PMID

  • Anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis)
  • ^Barre, Annick; Culerrier, Raphaël; Granier, Claude; Selman, Laetitia; Peumans, Willy J.; Van Damme, Els J.M.; Bienvenu, Françoise; Bienvenu, Jacques; Rougé, Pierre (). «Mapping of IgE-binding epitopes on the major latex allergen Hev b 2 and the cross-reacting 1,3β-glucanase fruit allergens as a molecular basis for the latex-fruit syndrome». Molecular Immunology.

    46 (8–9): – doi/ PMID

  • adhesive tape and bandages
  • gloves
  • ^«Archived copy». Archived from the original on Retrieved CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  • Kiwi
  • ^ ab«Don’t be Misled by ‘Latex Free’ Claims». FDA. March 30,
  • ^Wagner, S.; Breiteneder, H. (). «The latex‒fruit syndrome». Biochemical Society Transactions. 30 (6): – doi/BST PMID
  • Banana
  • dental dams and material used to fill root canals
  • pacifiers and baby-bottle nipples
  • Avocado
  • Itchy, red or swollen skin after using a bandage
  • ^Tarlo, Susan M.; Sussman, Gordon; Contala, Anne; Swanson, Mark C.

    (). «Control of airborne latex by use of powder-free latex gloves». Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 93 (6): –9. doi/S(94) PMID

  • Come in contact with the skin
  • ^«Preventing Allergic Reactions to Natural Rubber Latex in the Workplace». The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. June Retrieved June 12,
  • ^Wheatley, Chris (September ). «Latex allergy may be seen as the latest ‘issue’; but it isn’t going to just go away».[unreliable medical source?][self-published source?]
  • Rubber balls
  • Teach people who spend time with you how to use the auto-injector device.
  • Have a written anaphylaxis action plan.

    Your doctor will give you this step-by-step plan on what to do in an emergency.

  • Inflammation of the eyes
  • Rubber household gloves
  • Get into the lungs by breathing them in
  • Breathing problems including asthma symptoms
  • Balloons
  • And more
  • ^Taylor, J.S. & Erkek, E. (). «Latex allergy: diagnosis and management». Dermatologic Therapy. 17 (4): – doi/jx. PMID
  • ^Brehler, R.; Theissen, U.; Mohr, C.; Luger, T. (). «‘Latex-fruit syndrome’: frequency of cross-reacting IgE antibodies». Allergy. 52 (4): – doi/jtbx.

    PMID

  • Potatoes
  • ^Böhm, Ingrid (). «Latex allergy in patients suspected for contrast medium hypersensitivity: A neglected differential diagnosis». Acta Radiologica. 51 (6): – doi/ PMID
  • ^Koh, D.; Ng, V.; Leow, Y-H.; Goh, C.L. (). «A study of natural rubber latex allergens in gloves used by healthcare workers in Singapore». British Journal of Dermatology. (5): –9. doi/jx. PMID
  • ^Latex Allergy~workup at eMedicine
  • Chestnut
  • diapers and sanitary pads
  • ^ abReddy, Sumana (January 1, ).

    «Latex Allergy». American Family Physician. 57 (1): 93– PMID

  • Celery
  • ^ ab«Protect Yourself from Latex Allergies». Ivanhoe Broadcast News. December Archived from the original on July 9, Retrieved June 12,
  • balloons
  • Ask co-workers to wear only non-latex gloves.
  • Papaya
  • Avoid latex. The only treatment for latex allergy is to prevent any contact with latex products.
  • waistbands on clothing
  • Get a letter about your latex allergy from your doctor.
  • Frequent hand washing and incomplete drying
  • ^,p/
  • ^Lynn, Kellye (January 15, ).

    «Hopkins ceases use of latex gloves during surgery». Baltimore: WJZ 13 (CBS). Archived from the original on October 11,

  • ^Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Becerril-Luján, Baltazar; Agundis, Concepción; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Pereyra, Ali; Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela (). «Analysis of B-cell epitopes from the allergen Hev b revealed by using blocking antibodies». Molecular Immunology. 46 (4): – doi/ PMID
  • Wear medical alert identification or jewelry to tell others of latex allergy in an emergency.
  • Irritant dermatitis
  • ^Kolarich, Daniel; Altmann, Friedrich; Sunderasan, Elumalai ().

    «Structural analysis of the glycoprotein allergen Hev b 4 from natural rubber latex by mass spectrometry». Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) — General Subjects.

    What foods should be avoided with a latex allergy

    (4): – doi/ PMID

  • Itching or swelling after using a condom or diaphragm
  • Check labels to make certain products do not contain latex. Do not assume “hypoallergenic” products are latex-free.
  • IgE-mediated allergic reactions (Type I). These are true allergic reactions involving the immune system and they can be life threatening.
  • ^Reyes-López, César A; Hernández-Santoyo, Alejandra; Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Mendoza, Guillermo; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; Rodrı́guez-Romero, Adela ().

    «Insights into a conformational epitope of Hev b (hevein)». Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. (1): – doi/ PMID

  • Itchy or swollen lips after blowing up a balloon
  • condoms.
  • Rubber bands
  • ^Beezhold, Donald H.; Hickey, Vicky L.; Slater, Jay E.; Sussman, Gordon L. (). «Human IgE-binding epitopes of the latex allergen Hev b 5».

    Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

    What foods should be avoided with a latex allergy

    (6): – doi/S(99) PMID

  • ^«Why do polyisoprene condoms work as latex allergy condom choices?». Retrieved
  • Condoms and diaphragms
  • Apple
  • ^Mikkola, Jari H.; Alenius, Harri; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Turjanmaa, Kristiina; Palosuo, Timo; Reunala, Timo (). «Hevein-like protein domains as a possible cause for allergen cross-reactivity between latex and banana». Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. (6): – doi/S(98) PMID
  • Always own two epinephrine auto-injectors near you at every times.
  • Friction irritation from glove powder
  • Use of hand sanitizers
  • urinary catheters
  • ^«Safety and Health Topics Latex Allergy».

    Retrieved

  • Swelling
  • blood pressure cuffs
  • Swelling or itching of the mouth or tongue after a dentist uses latex gloves
  • ^«Allergy to Latex Rubber». American Dental Association.
  • Ask doctors, dentists and others health care workers to use latex-free gloves.
  • ^Grzybowski, M; Ownby, D; Rivers, E; Ander, D; Nowak, R (). «The prevalence of latex-specific IgE in patients presenting to an urban emergency department». Annals of Emergency Medicine. 40 (4): –9. doi/S(02)X. PMID
  • Hives
  • ^«Latex Allergy: Latex Allergy Infographic». Retrieved [unreliable medical source?]
  • Tomatoes
  • Learn how to self-inject epinephrine (ep-uh-NEF-rin).

    It is the medicine of choice to treat an allergic reaction or anaphylaxis. Epinephrine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. It injects a single dose of medicine when you press it against your outer thigh. Your doctor will show you how to use it. Epinephrine can save your life if you own a severe reaction. After using an epinephrine auto-injector, you must immediately call and seek medical care.

  • rubber toys
  • Itching or swelling after vaginal or rectal exams
  • ^Chen, Zhiping; Cremer, Reinhold; Posch, Anton; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Baur, Xaver ().

    «On the allergenicity of Hev b 1 among health care workers and patients with spina bifida allergic to natural rubber latex». Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. (5): – doi/S(97)X. PMID

  • Runny nose or sneezing
  • rubber bands
  • ^Diaz-Perales, A.; Sanchez-Monge, R.; Blanco, C.; Lombardero, M.; Carillo, T.; Salcedo, G. (). «What is the role of the hevein-like domain of fruit class I chitinases in their allergenic capacity?».

    Clinical & Experimental Allergy. 32 (3): – doi/jx. PMID

  • equipment for resuscitation.

Latex Allergy

What Causes an Allergy to Latex?

People may use the term “latex allergy,” but not every reactions to latex are due to having a true allergy to latex.

An allergic reaction is an abnormal response of the immune system to a harmless substance. People with latex allergies own over-sensitive immune systems. Their immune system reacts to latex as if it were a harmful substance.

What Should I Do If I Own Latex Allergy?

If you own an IgE-mediated (Type I) latex allergy, work with your doctor to study how to recognize anaphylaxis and how to treat it.

Prevent Allergic Reactions to Latex:

  1. Avoid latex.

    The only treatment for latex allergy is to prevent any contact with latex products.

  2. Ask doctors, dentists and others health care workers to use latex-free gloves.
  3. Get a letter about your latex allergy from your doctor.
  4. Ask co-workers to wear only non-latex gloves.
  5. Check labels to make certain products do not contain latex. Do not assume “hypoallergenic” products are latex-free.

Prepare for Anaphylaxis Due to Latex:

  1. Have a written anaphylaxis action plan. Your doctor will give you this step-by-step plan on what to do in an emergency.
  2. Teach people who spend time with you how to use the auto-injector device.
  3. Learn how to self-inject epinephrine (ep-uh-NEF-rin).

    It is the medicine of choice to treat an allergic reaction or anaphylaxis. Epinephrine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. It injects a single dose of medicine when you press it against your outer thigh. Your doctor will show you how to use it. Epinephrine can save your life if you own a severe reaction. After using an epinephrine auto-injector, you must immediately call and seek medical care.

  4. Always own two epinephrine auto-injectors near you at every times.
  5. Wear medical alert identification or jewelry to tell others of latex allergy in an emergency.

IgE-Mediated Latex Allergy (Type I)

An IgE-mediated latex allergy is an allergy to natural rubber latex proteins.

The body’s immune system makes antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. These IgE antibodies react with latex proteins and cause allergy symptoms.

An allergic reaction can happen when latex proteins:

  1. Come in contact with the skin
  2. Come in contact with a mucous membrane such as the mouth
  3. Get into the lungs by breathing them in

Allergic reactions to latex can be severe and life threatening. People with this type of latex allergy should avoid latex.

Who Is Likely to Own a Latex Allergy?

Less than 1% of people in the US own a latex allergy.

Although latex allergy is rare, the condition is more common in certain high-risk groups.

The highest risk is in children with spina bifida. Spina bifida is a condition in which the spine fails to form completely before birth. More than three out of every five children with spina bifida are allergic to latex.

Children who own frequent medical treatments or lengthy surgeries are also at high risk. Numerous medical supplies use latex – from gloves to tubing to enema tips.

Between 8 to 17% of health care workers and others who regularly use latex gloves are allergic to latex. Health care workers and children who own other allergies and get contact dermatitis when they use latex gloves are more likely to develop a latex allergy.

New cases of latex allergy are no longer common.

However, in the s and s they were much more frequent. Now, numerous health care facilities use non-latex gloves and products.

What Are the Types of Latex Reactions?

There are three types of reactions to natural rubber latex:

  1. IgE-mediated allergic reactions (Type I). These are true allergic reactions involving the immune system and they can be life threatening.
  2. Cell-mediated contact dermatitis (Type IV)
  3. Irritant dermatitis

What Are the Symptoms of Allergic Reactions to Latex?

Common early symptoms include swelling, redness and itching after contact with latex items:

  1. Itchy or swollen lips after blowing up a balloon
  2. Itching or swelling after vaginal or rectal exams
  3. Itchy, red or swollen skin after using a bandage
  4. Swelling or itching of the mouth or tongue after a dentist uses latex gloves
  5. Itching or swelling after using a condom or diaphragm

People highly allergic to latex may own severe reactions from contact with latex.

They may even react to a little quantity of latex in the air, such as being in a room near latex balloons or gloves. These more severe reactions can include:

  1. Hives
  2. Breathing problems including asthma symptoms
  3. Runny nose or sneezing
  4. Inflammation of the eyes
  5. Swelling
  6. Anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis)

Anaphylaxis can be severe and life threatening. In rare cases, anaphylaxis to latex can cause death.

Do not ignore symptoms that propose you may be allergic to latex. Continued contact with latex products can lead to more severe reactions.

Prolonged exposure to latex can cause people to develop chronic conditions love occupational asthma.

What Is Latex?

The term “latex”refers to the protein in the sap of the Brazilian rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). It also refers to “natural rubber products” made from that sap.

Latex is in numerous everyday products:

  1. Balloons
  2. Bandages
  3. Condoms and diaphragms
  4. Rubber balls
  5. Rubber bands
  6. Rubber household gloves
  7. And more

Contact with these products can cause an allergic reaction. Some people own allergic reactions by breathing in latex fibers in the air.

Some people own allergic reactions from skin contact with latex.

Synthetic latex, such as that in latex paint, does not come from the sap of a Brazilian rubber tree. Exposure to synthetic latex does not cause the symptoms of latex allergy.

Irritant Contact Dermatitis

Irritant contact dermatitis is a common reaction to natural rubber latex, but it is not an allergy. Irritant contact dermatitis is a red, itchy rash that breaks out where latex has touched your skin. It appears 12 to 24 hours after contact.

Irritant contact dermatitis can be the result of:

  1. Frequent hand washing and incomplete drying
  2. Use of hand sanitizers
  3. Friction irritation from glove powder

Anyone who wears powdered latex gloves can develop this condition.

In people with allergies, contact dermatitis can be a warning sign that latex allergy may develop.

Cell-Mediated Contact Dermatitis (Type IV)

Dermatitis means skin inflammation. Cell-mediated contact dermatitis (Type IV) is a type of allergy to latex. It is not a life-threatening allergy. This type of reaction is generally due to sensitivity to chemicals used to make latex products, rather than to rubber proteins. There are numerous chemicals used in the manufacturing process. Any of these chemicals can cause contact dermatitis 24 to 48 hours after exposure. This type of dermatitis can spread to other areas, including the face, if touched. Symptoms generally resolve spontaneously.

Four out of fivepeople who develop an IgE-mediated latex allergy will own contact dermatitis first.

How Do Doctors Diagnose Latex Allergy?

If you ponder you may be allergic to latex, see a doctor familiar with the condition.

To diagnose latex allergy, the doctor will enquire you about your medical history and do a physical exam. If they suspect latex allergy, they may order a blood test. The blood test involves looking for latex antibodies in a blood sample. Your doctor compares your test results with your history and physical exam to make a diagnosis of latex allergy.

What Are Latex Cross-Reactive Foods?

Some foods own proteins that are love those in the rubber tree sap. Sometimes people with latex allergies experience a reaction to “latex reactive foods.” You may hear this called Latex-Food Syndrome or Latex-Fruit Allergy. Latex reactive foods include nuts and fruit, particularly:

  1. Banana
  2. Potatoes
  3. Apple
  4. Tomatoes
  5. Kiwi
  6. Papaya
  7. Avocado
  8. Celery
  9. Carrot
  10. Chestnut
  11. Melons

Ask your doctor for guidance on eating these foods if you own a latex allergy.

Medical ReviewOctober

Natural rubber latex comes from a liquid in tropical rubber trees.

This liquid is processed to make numerous of the following rubber products used at home and at work:

  1. dishwashing gloves
  2. adhesive tape and bandages
  3. rubber toys
  4. diapers and sanitary pads
  5. waistbands on clothing
  6. rubber bands
  7. balloons
  8. pacifiers and baby-bottle nipples
  9. condoms.

In addition, numerous medical and dental supplies contain latex, including:

  1. gloves
  2. tourniquets
  3. urinary catheters
  4. dental dams and material used to fill root canals
  5. blood pressure cuffs
  6. equipment for resuscitation.

You can discover non-latex substitutes for every of these latex-containing items.

The protein in rubber can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

This reaction can range from sneezing to anaphylactic shock. This type of shock is a serious condition that requires immediate medical attention.

The thin, stretchy latex rubber in gloves, condoms, and balloons is high in this protein. It causes more allergic reactions than products made of hard latex rubber (such as tires). Some latex gloves are coated with cornstarch powder. Latex protein particles can stick to the cornstarch and fly into the air when the gloves are taken off. In places where gloves are being put on and removed frequently, the air may contain numerous latex particles.

1.

Nutter AF. Contact urticaria to rubber. Br J Dermatol. ;(5)&#x;

2. Wakelin SH, White IR. Natural rubber latex allergy. Clin Exp Dermatol. ;24(4)&#x;

3. Taylor JS, Erkek E. Latex allergy: diagnosis and management. Dermatol Ther. ;17(4)&#x;

4. American Latex Allergy Association. Accessed August 20,

5. Reddy S. Latex allergy. Am Fam Physician. ;57(1)&#x;

6. Shaffrali FC, Gawkrodger DJ. Allergic contact dermatitis from natural rubber latex without immediate hypersensitivity. Contact Dermatitis.

;40(6)&#x;

7. Bernardini R, Novembre E, Lombardi E, et al. Prevalence of and risk factors for latex sensitization in patients with spina bifida. J Urol. ;(5)&#x;

8.

What foods should be avoided with a latex allergy

Niggemann B, Buck D, Michael T, Wahn U. Latex provocation tests in patients with spina bifida: who is at risk of becoming symptomatic? J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(4 pt 1)&#x;

9. Larese Filon F, Bosco A, Fiorito A, Negro C, Barbina P. Latex symptoms and sensitisation in health care workers. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. ;74(3)&#x;

Bousquet J, Flahault A, Vandenplas O, et al. Natural rubber latex allergy among health care workers: a systematic review of the evidence.

J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(2)&#x;

Schmid K, Christoph Broding H, Niklas D, Drexler H. Latex sensitization in dental students using powder-free gloves low in latex protein: a cross-sectional study. Contact Dermatitis. ;47(2)&#x;

Woods JA, Lambert S, Platts-Mills TA, Drake DB, Edlich RF. Natural rubber latex allergy: spectrum, diagnostic approach, and therapy. J Emerg Med. ;15(1)&#x;

Allmers H, Schmengler J, Skudlik C. Primary prevention of natural rubber latex allergy in the German health care system through education and intervention.

J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(2)&#x;

Allmers H, Schmengler J, John SM. Decreasing incidence of occupational contact urticaria caused by natural rubber latex allergy in German health care workers. J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(2)&#x;

Reunala T, Turjanmaa K, Alenius H, Reinikka-Railo H, Palosuo T. A significant decrease in the incidence of latex-allergic health care workers parallels with a decreasing percentage of highly allergenic latex gloves in the market in Finland.

J Allergy and Clin Immunol. ;(2 suppl 1):S

Nettis E, Assennato G, Ferrannini A, Tursi A. Type I allergy to natural rubber latex and type IV allergy to rubber chemicals in health care workers with glove-related skin symptoms. Clin Exp Allergy. ;32(3)&#x;

Sapan N, Nacarkucuk E, Canitez Y, Saglam H. Evaluation of the need for routine preoperative latex allergy tests in children. Pediatr Int. ;44(2)&#x;

Porri F, Lemiere C, Birnbaum J, et al. Prevalence of latex sensitization in subjects attending health screening: implications for a perioperative screening. Clin Exp Allergy. ;27(4)&#x;

Degenhardt P, Golla S, Wahn F, Niggemann B.

Latex allergy in pediatric surgery is dependent on repeated operations in the first year of life. J Pediatr Surg. ;36(10)&#x;

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Preventing allergic reactions to natural rubber latex in the workplace. Cincinnati, Ohio: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; NIOSH publication no. 97&#x; Accessed October 5,

Buss ZS, Kupek E, Fröde TS. Screening for latex sensitization by questionnaire: diagnostic performance in health care workers.

J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol. ;18(1)&#x;

Hamilton RG, Adkinson NF Jr. Diagnosis of natural rubber latex allergy: multicenter latex skin testing efficacy study. Multicenter Latex Skin Testing Study Task Force. J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(3)&#x;

Suli C, Lorini M, Mistrello G, Tedeschi A. Diagnosis of latex hypersensitivity: comparison of diverse methods. Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. ;38(1)&#x;

Palczynski C, Walusiak J, Ruta U, Gorski P. Nasal provocation test in the diagnosis of natural rubber latex allergy.

Allergy. ;55(1)&#x;

Smith AM, Amin HS, Biagini RE, et al. Percutaneous reactivity to natural rubber latex proteins persists in health-care workers following avoidance of natural rubber latex. Clin Exp Allergy. ;37(9)&#x;

Buck D, Michael T, Wahn U, Niggemann B. Ventricular shunts and the prevalence of sensitization and clinically relevant allergy to latex in patients with spina bifida. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. ;11(2)&#x;

Ausili E, Tabacco F, Focarelli B, Nucera E, Patriarca G, Rendeli C. Prevalence of latex allergy in spina bifida: genetic and environmental risk factors. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. ;11(3)&#x;

LaMontagne AD, Radi S, Elder DS, Abramson MJ, Sim M.

Primary prevention of latex related sensitisation and occupational asthma: a systematic review. Occup Environ Med. ;63(5)&#x;

Tarlo SM, Easty A, Eubanks K, et al. Outcomes of a natural rubber latex control program in an Ontario teaching hospital. J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(4)&#x;

Nettis E, Colanardi MC, Soccio AL, et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of sublingual immunotherapy in patients with latex-induced urticaria: a month study. Br J Dermatol. ;(4)&#x;

Nucera E, Schiavino D, Sabato V, et al. Sublingual immunotherapy for latex allergy: tolerability and safety profile of rush build-up phase.

Curr Med Res Opin. ;24(4)&#x;

Bernardini R, Pecora S, Milani M, Burastero SE. Natural rubber latex allergy in children: clinical and immunological effects of 3-years sublingual immunotherapy. Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. ;40(4)&#x;

What is a Food Allergy? There Are Diverse Types of Allergic Reactions to Foods

Latex Allergy

What Causes an Allergy to Latex?

People may use the term “latex allergy,” but not every reactions to latex are due to having a true allergy to latex.

An allergic reaction is an abnormal response of the immune system to a harmless substance.

People with latex allergies own over-sensitive immune systems. Their immune system reacts to latex as if it were a harmful substance.

What Should I Do If I Own Latex Allergy?

If you own an IgE-mediated (Type I) latex allergy, work with your doctor to study how to recognize anaphylaxis and how to treat it.

Prevent Allergic Reactions to Latex:

  1. Avoid latex. The only treatment for latex allergy is to prevent any contact with latex products.
  2. Ask doctors, dentists and others health care workers to use latex-free gloves.
  3. Get a letter about your latex allergy from your doctor.
  4. Ask co-workers to wear only non-latex gloves.
  5. Check labels to make certain products do not contain latex.

    Do not assume “hypoallergenic” products are latex-free.

Prepare for Anaphylaxis Due to Latex:

  1. Have a written anaphylaxis action plan. Your doctor will give you this step-by-step plan on what to do in an emergency.
  2. Teach people who spend time with you how to use the auto-injector device.
  3. Learn how to self-inject epinephrine (ep-uh-NEF-rin). It is the medicine of choice to treat an allergic reaction or anaphylaxis. Epinephrine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector.

    It injects a single dose of medicine when you press it against your outer thigh. Your doctor will show you how to use it. Epinephrine can save your life if you own a severe reaction. After using an epinephrine auto-injector, you must immediately call and seek medical care.

  4. Always own two epinephrine auto-injectors near you at every times.
  5. Wear medical alert identification or jewelry to tell others of latex allergy in an emergency.

IgE-Mediated Latex Allergy (Type I)

An IgE-mediated latex allergy is an allergy to natural rubber latex proteins. The body’s immune system makes antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies.

These IgE antibodies react with latex proteins and cause allergy symptoms.

An allergic reaction can happen when latex proteins:

  1. Come in contact with the skin
  2. Come in contact with a mucous membrane such as the mouth
  3. Get into the lungs by breathing them in

Allergic reactions to latex can be severe and life threatening. People with this type of latex allergy should avoid latex.

Who Is Likely to Own a Latex Allergy?

Less than 1% of people in the US own a latex allergy. Although latex allergy is rare, the condition is more common in certain high-risk groups.

The highest risk is in children with spina bifida.

Spina bifida is a condition in which the spine fails to form completely before birth. More than three out of every five children with spina bifida are allergic to latex.

Children who own frequent medical treatments or lengthy surgeries are also at high risk. Numerous medical supplies use latex – from gloves to tubing to enema tips.

Between 8 to 17% of health care workers and others who regularly use latex gloves are allergic to latex. Health care workers and children who own other allergies and get contact dermatitis when they use latex gloves are more likely to develop a latex allergy.

New cases of latex allergy are no longer common.

However, in the s and s they were much more frequent. Now, numerous health care facilities use non-latex gloves and products.

What Are the Types of Latex Reactions?

There are three types of reactions to natural rubber latex:

  1. IgE-mediated allergic reactions (Type I). These are true allergic reactions involving the immune system and they can be life threatening.
  2. Cell-mediated contact dermatitis (Type IV)
  3. Irritant dermatitis

What Are the Symptoms of Allergic Reactions to Latex?

Common early symptoms include swelling, redness and itching after contact with latex items:

  1. Itchy or swollen lips after blowing up a balloon
  2. Itching or swelling after vaginal or rectal exams
  3. Itchy, red or swollen skin after using a bandage
  4. Swelling or itching of the mouth or tongue after a dentist uses latex gloves
  5. Itching or swelling after using a condom or diaphragm

People highly allergic to latex may own severe reactions from contact with latex.

They may even react to a little quantity of latex in the air, such as being in a room near latex balloons or gloves. These more severe reactions can include:

  1. Hives
  2. Breathing problems including asthma symptoms
  3. Runny nose or sneezing
  4. Inflammation of the eyes
  5. Swelling
  6. Anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis)

Anaphylaxis can be severe and life threatening. In rare cases, anaphylaxis to latex can cause death.

Do not ignore symptoms that propose you may be allergic to latex. Continued contact with latex products can lead to more severe reactions. Prolonged exposure to latex can cause people to develop chronic conditions love occupational asthma.

What Is Latex?

The term “latex”refers to the protein in the sap of the Brazilian rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis).

It also refers to “natural rubber products” made from that sap.

Latex is in numerous everyday products:

  1. Balloons
  2. Bandages
  3. Condoms and diaphragms
  4. Rubber balls
  5. Rubber bands
  6. Rubber household gloves
  7. And more

Contact with these products can cause an allergic reaction. Some people own allergic reactions by breathing in latex fibers in the air. Some people own allergic reactions from skin contact with latex.

Synthetic latex, such as that in latex paint, does not come from the sap of a Brazilian rubber tree. Exposure to synthetic latex does not cause the symptoms of latex allergy.

Irritant Contact Dermatitis

Irritant contact dermatitis is a common reaction to natural rubber latex, but it is not an allergy.

Irritant contact dermatitis is a red, itchy rash that breaks out where latex has touched your skin. It appears 12 to 24 hours after contact.

Irritant contact dermatitis can be the result of:

  1. Frequent hand washing and incomplete drying
  2. Use of hand sanitizers
  3. Friction irritation from glove powder

Anyone who wears powdered latex gloves can develop this condition. In people with allergies, contact dermatitis can be a warning sign that latex allergy may develop.

Cell-Mediated Contact Dermatitis (Type IV)

Dermatitis means skin inflammation.

Cell-mediated contact dermatitis (Type IV) is a type of allergy to latex. It is not a life-threatening allergy. This type of reaction is generally due to sensitivity to chemicals used to make latex products, rather than to rubber proteins. There are numerous chemicals used in the manufacturing process. Any of these chemicals can cause contact dermatitis 24 to 48 hours after exposure. This type of dermatitis can spread to other areas, including the face, if touched. Symptoms generally resolve spontaneously.

Four out of fivepeople who develop an IgE-mediated latex allergy will own contact dermatitis first.

How Do Doctors Diagnose Latex Allergy?

If you ponder you may be allergic to latex, see a doctor familiar with the condition.

To diagnose latex allergy, the doctor will enquire you about your medical history and do a physical exam. If they suspect latex allergy, they may order a blood test. The blood test involves looking for latex antibodies in a blood sample. Your doctor compares your test results with your history and physical exam to make a diagnosis of latex allergy.

What Are Latex Cross-Reactive Foods?

Some foods own proteins that are love those in the rubber tree sap. Sometimes people with latex allergies experience a reaction to “latex reactive foods.” You may hear this called Latex-Food Syndrome or Latex-Fruit Allergy.

Latex reactive foods include nuts and fruit, particularly:

  1. Banana
  2. Potatoes
  3. Apple
  4. Tomatoes
  5. Kiwi
  6. Papaya
  7. Avocado
  8. Celery
  9. Carrot
  10. Chestnut
  11. Melons

Ask your doctor for guidance on eating these foods if you own a latex allergy.

Medical ReviewOctober

Natural rubber latex comes from a liquid in tropical rubber trees. This liquid is processed to make numerous of the following rubber products used at home and at work:

  1. dishwashing gloves
  2. adhesive tape and bandages
  3. rubber toys
  4. diapers and sanitary pads
  5. waistbands on clothing
  6. rubber bands
  7. balloons
  8. pacifiers and baby-bottle nipples
  9. condoms.

In addition, numerous medical and dental supplies contain latex, including:

  1. gloves
  2. tourniquets
  3. urinary catheters
  4. dental dams and material used to fill root canals
  5. blood pressure cuffs
  6. equipment for resuscitation.

You can discover non-latex substitutes for every of these latex-containing items.

The protein in rubber can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

This reaction can range from sneezing to anaphylactic shock. This type of shock is a serious condition that requires immediate medical attention.

The thin, stretchy latex rubber in gloves, condoms, and balloons is high in this protein. It causes more allergic reactions than products made of hard latex rubber (such as tires). Some latex gloves are coated with cornstarch powder. Latex protein particles can stick to the cornstarch and fly into the air when the gloves are taken off. In places where gloves are being put on and removed frequently, the air may contain numerous latex particles.

1.

Nutter AF. Contact urticaria to rubber. Br J Dermatol. ;(5)&#x;

2. Wakelin SH, White IR. Natural rubber latex allergy. Clin Exp Dermatol. ;24(4)&#x;

3. Taylor JS, Erkek E. Latex allergy: diagnosis and management. Dermatol Ther. ;17(4)&#x;

4. American Latex Allergy Association. Accessed August 20,

5. Reddy S. Latex allergy. Am Fam Physician. ;57(1)&#x;

6. Shaffrali FC, Gawkrodger DJ. Allergic contact dermatitis from natural rubber latex without immediate hypersensitivity. Contact Dermatitis. ;40(6)&#x;

7. Bernardini R, Novembre E, Lombardi E, et al.

Prevalence of and risk factors for latex sensitization in patients with spina bifida. J Urol. ;(5)&#x;

8. Niggemann B, Buck D, Michael T, Wahn U. Latex provocation tests in patients with spina bifida: who is at risk of becoming symptomatic? J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(4 pt 1)&#x;

9. Larese Filon F, Bosco A, Fiorito A, Negro C, Barbina P. Latex symptoms and sensitisation in health care workers. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. ;74(3)&#x;

Bousquet J, Flahault A, Vandenplas O, et al. Natural rubber latex allergy among health care workers: a systematic review of the evidence.

J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(2)&#x;

Schmid K, Christoph Broding H, Niklas D, Drexler H. Latex sensitization in dental students using powder-free gloves low in latex protein: a cross-sectional study. Contact Dermatitis. ;47(2)&#x;

Woods JA, Lambert S, Platts-Mills TA, Drake DB, Edlich RF. Natural rubber latex allergy: spectrum, diagnostic approach, and therapy. J Emerg Med. ;15(1)&#x;

Allmers H, Schmengler J, Skudlik C. Primary prevention of natural rubber latex allergy in the German health care system through education and intervention. J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(2)&#x;

Allmers H, Schmengler J, John SM.

Decreasing incidence of occupational contact urticaria caused by natural rubber latex allergy in German health care workers. J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(2)&#x;

Reunala T, Turjanmaa K, Alenius H, Reinikka-Railo H, Palosuo T. A significant decrease in the incidence of latex-allergic health care workers parallels with a decreasing percentage of highly allergenic latex gloves in the market in Finland. J Allergy and Clin Immunol. ;(2 suppl 1):S

Nettis E, Assennato G, Ferrannini A, Tursi A. Type I allergy to natural rubber latex and type IV allergy to rubber chemicals in health care workers with glove-related skin symptoms.

Clin Exp Allergy. ;32(3)&#x;

Sapan N, Nacarkucuk E, Canitez Y, Saglam H. Evaluation of the need for routine preoperative latex allergy tests in children. Pediatr Int. ;44(2)&#x;

Porri F, Lemiere C, Birnbaum J, et al. Prevalence of latex sensitization in subjects attending health screening: implications for a perioperative screening. Clin Exp Allergy. ;27(4)&#x;

Degenhardt P, Golla S, Wahn F, Niggemann B. Latex allergy in pediatric surgery is dependent on repeated operations in the first year of life. J Pediatr Surg. ;36(10)&#x;

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Preventing allergic reactions to natural rubber latex in the workplace.

Cincinnati, Ohio: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; NIOSH publication no. 97&#x; Accessed October 5,

Buss ZS, Kupek E, Fröde TS. Screening for latex sensitization by questionnaire: diagnostic performance in health care workers. J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol. ;18(1)&#x;

Hamilton RG, Adkinson NF Jr. Diagnosis of natural rubber latex allergy: multicenter latex skin testing efficacy study. Multicenter Latex Skin Testing Study Task Force.

What foods should be avoided with a latex allergy

J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(3)&#x;

Suli C, Lorini M, Mistrello G, Tedeschi A. Diagnosis of latex hypersensitivity: comparison of diverse methods. Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. ;38(1)&#x;

Palczynski C, Walusiak J, Ruta U, Gorski P. Nasal provocation test in the diagnosis of natural rubber latex allergy. Allergy. ;55(1)&#x;

Smith AM, Amin HS, Biagini RE, et al. Percutaneous reactivity to natural rubber latex proteins persists in health-care workers following avoidance of natural rubber latex. Clin Exp Allergy. ;37(9)&#x;

Buck D, Michael T, Wahn U, Niggemann B. Ventricular shunts and the prevalence of sensitization and clinically relevant allergy to latex in patients with spina bifida.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol. ;11(2)&#x;

Ausili E, Tabacco F, Focarelli B, Nucera E, Patriarca G, Rendeli C. Prevalence of latex allergy in spina bifida: genetic and environmental risk factors. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. ;11(3)&#x;

LaMontagne AD, Radi S, Elder DS, Abramson MJ, Sim M. Primary prevention of latex related sensitisation and occupational asthma: a systematic review. Occup Environ Med. ;63(5)&#x;

Tarlo SM, Easty A, Eubanks K, et al. Outcomes of a natural rubber latex control program in an Ontario teaching hospital.

J Allergy Clin Immunol. ;(4)&#x;

Nettis E, Colanardi MC, Soccio AL, et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of sublingual immunotherapy in patients with latex-induced urticaria: a month study. Br J Dermatol. ;(4)&#x;

Nucera E, Schiavino D, Sabato V, et al. Sublingual immunotherapy for latex allergy: tolerability and safety profile of rush build-up phase. Curr Med Res Opin. ;24(4)&#x;

Bernardini R, Pecora S, Milani M, Burastero SE.

Natural rubber latex allergy in children: clinical and immunological effects of 3-years sublingual immunotherapy. Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. ;40(4)&#x;

What is a Food Allergy? There Are Diverse Types of Allergic Reactions to Foods


Epidemiology

Estimates of latex sensitivity in the general population range from % to %.[28]


Risk factors

  1. Industrial rubber workers, exposed for endless periods to high amounts of latex.

    About 10% develop an allergic reaction.[12]

  2. Children with spina bifida. Up to 68% will own a reaction.[24]
  3. Health care providers. Given the ubiquitous use of latex products in health care settings, management of latex allergy presents significant health organizational problems. Those healthcare workers—such as physicians, nurses, aides, dentists, dental hygienists, operating room employees, occupational therapists, laboratory technicians, and hospital housekeeping personnel—who frequently use latex gloves and other latex-containing medical supplies are at risk for developing latex allergy.[25] Between about 4% to 17% of healthcare workers own a reaction, which generally presents as Irritant Contact Dermatitis.

    This contact dermatitis can develop further through allergic sensitivity to a status of full anaphylactic shock. Apart from the uncomfortable and in some cases life-threatening health implications, this will effectively hinder the person from working with any quantity of latex and could impede their chance of maintaining their vocation.[26] In the surgical setting, the risk of a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction by a patient has been deemed by Johns Hopkins Hospital to be sufficiently high to replace every latex surgical gloves with synthetic alternatives.[27]


If your kid has symptoms after eating certain foods, he or she may own a food allergy.

A food allergy occurs when the body’s immune system sees a certain food as harmful and reacts by causing symptoms.

This is an allergic reaction. Foods that cause allergic reactions are allergens.

Two Categories of Food Allergies

  • Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  • Non-IgE mediated. Other parts of the body’s immune system react to a certain food. This reaction causes symptoms, but does not involve an IgE antibody. Someone can own both IgE mediated and non-IgE mediated food allergies.
  • Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  • Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated. Symptoms result from the body’s immune system making antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. These IgE antibodies react with a certain food.
  • Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Skin rash, itching, hives
  • Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain. Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  2. Skin rash, itching, hives
  3. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  4. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  5. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild. Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously. Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis). This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick.

Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine. This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis. The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods.

For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish. Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk. The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods.

For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods. Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables. So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas. That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue. Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting.

Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food. In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract. Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea. The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed. In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction.

Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist.

Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy. Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus. The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire.

Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat. The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy. It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours.

Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height. Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk.

This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools. Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December

IgE Mediated Food Allergies

The IgE mediated food allergies most common in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

The allergic reaction can involve the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut and brain. Some of the symptoms can include:

  1. Stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea
  2. Skin rash, itching, hives
  3. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing
  4. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  5. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Sometimes allergy symptoms are mild. Other times they can be severe. Take every allergic symptoms seriously. Mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis).

This reaction generally involves more than one part of the body and can get worse quick. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Treat anaphylaxis with epinephrine. This medicine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. You can’t rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis. The symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction happen shortly after contact with an allergen. In some individuals, there may be a delay of two to three hours before symptoms first appear.

Cross-Reactivity and Oral Allergy Syndrome

Having an IgE mediated allergy to one food can mean your kid is allergic to similar foods.

For example, if your kid is allergic to shrimp, he or she may be allergic to other types of shellfish, such as crab or crayfish. Or if your kid is allergic to cow’s milk, he or she may also be allergic to goat’s and sheep’s milk. The reaction between diverse foods is called cross-reactivity. This happens when proteins in one food are similar to the proteins in another food.

Cross-reactivity also can happen between latex and certain foods. For example, a kid who has an allergy to latex may also own an allergy to bananas, avocados, kiwis or chestnuts.

Some people who own allergies to pollens, such as ragweed and grasses, may also be allergic to some foods. Proteins in the pollens are love the proteins in some fruits and vegetables.

So, if your kid is allergic to ragweed, he or she may own an allergic reaction to melons and bananas. That’s because the protein in ragweed looks love the proteins in melons and bananas. This condition is oral allergy syndrome.

Symptoms of an oral allergy syndrome include an itchy mouth, throat or tongue. Symptoms can be more severe and may include hives, shortness of breath and vomiting. Reactions generally happen only when someone eats raw food. In rare cases, reactions can be life-threatening and need epinephrine.

Non-IgE Mediated Food Allergies

Most symptoms of non-IgE mediated food allergies involve the digestive tract.

Symptoms may be vomiting and diarrhea.

What foods should be avoided with a latex allergy

The symptoms can take longer to develop and may final longer than IgE mediated allergy symptoms. Sometimes, a reaction to a food allergen occurs up 3 days after eating the food allergen.

When an allergic reaction occurs with this type of allergy, epinephrine is generally not needed. In general, the best way to treat these allergies is to stay away from the food that causes the reaction.

What foods should be avoided with a latex allergy

Under are examples of conditions related to non-IgE mediated food allergies.

Not every children who react to a certain food own an allergy. They may own food intolerance. Examples are lactose intolerance, gluten intolerance, sulfite sensitivity or dye sensitivity. Staying away from these foods is the best way to avoid a reaction. Your child’s doctor may propose other steps to prevent a reaction. If your kid has any food allergy symptoms, see your child’s doctor or allergist. Only a doctor can properly diagnose whether your kid has an IgE- or non-IgE food allergy. Both can be present in some children.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

Eosinophilic (ee-uh-sin-uh-fil-ik) esophagitis is an inflamed esophagus.

The esophagus is a tube from the throat to the stomach. An allergy to a food can cause this condition.

With EoE, swallowing food can be hard and painful. Symptoms in infants and toddlers are irritability, problems with eating and poor weight acquire. Older children may own reflux, vomiting, stomach pain, chest pain and a feeling love food is “stuck” in their throat. The symptoms can happen days or even weeks after eating a food allergen.

EoE is treated by special diets that remove the foods that are causing the condition. Medication may also be used to reduce inflammation.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

FPIES is another type of food allergy.

It most often affects young infants. Symptoms generally don’t appear for two or more hours. Symptoms include vomiting, which starts about 2 hours or later after eating the food causing the condition. This condition can also cause diarrhea and failure to acquire weight or height. Once the baby stops eating the food causing the allergy, the symptoms go away. Rarely, severe vomiting and diarrhea can happen which can lead to dehydration and even shock. Shock occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow. Emergency treatment for severe symptoms must happen correct away at a hospital. The foods most likely to cause a reaction are dairy, soy, rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash and poultry.

Allergic Proctocolitis

Allergic proctocolitis is an allergy to formula or breast milk.

This condition inflames the lower part of the intestine. It affects infants in their first year of life and generally ends by age 1 year.

The symptoms include blood-streaked, watery and mucus-filled stools. Infants may also develop green stools, diarrhea, vomiting, anemia (low blood count) and fussiness. When properly diagnosed, symptoms resolve once the offending food(s) are removed from the diet.

Medical review December


Alternatives

  1. Chemical treatment to reduce the quantity of antigenic proteins in Hevea latex has yielded alternative materials, such as Vytex, which reduce exposure to latex allergens while otherwise retaining the properties of natural rubber.
  2. Synthetic rubbers such as elastane, neoprene, nitrile and artificially synthesized polyisoprene latex do not contain the proteins from the Hevea brasiliensis tree.[29]
  3. Products made from guayule natural rubber emulsions also do not contain the proteins from the Hevea rubber tree, and do not cause allergy in persons sensitized to Hevea proteins.[24][30][31]
  4. In , the first polyurethane condoms were produced, designed for people with latex allergies.

For some people, the sensitivity is so extreme that replacement of latex products with products made from alternative materials may still result in a reaction if the products are manufactured in the same facility as the latex-containing products, due to trace quantities of natural rubber latex on the non-latex products.[31]


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