What causes allergy on the face

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What Is a Fish Allergy?

A fish allergy is not exactly the same as a seafood allergy. Seafood includes fish (like tuna or cod) and shellfish (like lobster or clams). Even though they both drop into the category of "seafood," fish and shellfish are biologically diverse. So shellfish will only cause an allergic reaction in someone with a fish allergy if that person also has a shellfish allergy.

People with a fish allergy might be allergic to some types of fish but not others. Although most allergic reactions to fish happen when someone eats fish, sometimes people can react to touching fish or breathing in vapors from cooking fish.

Fish allergy can develop at any age.

Even people who own eaten fish in the past can develop an allergy. Some people outgrow certain food allergies over time. But those with fish allergies generally own that allergy for the relax of their lives.

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Fish Allergy?

When someone is allergic to fish, the body’s immune system, which normally fights infections, overreacts to proteins in the fish. Every time the person eats (or, in some cases, handles or breathes in) fish, the body thinks these proteins are harmful invaders and releases chemicals love .

This can cause symptoms such as:

  1. wheezing
  2. coughing
  3. throat tightness
  4. belly pain
  5. diarrhea
  6. vomiting
  7. hives
  8. swelling
  9. trouble breathing
  10. itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  11. red spots
  12. hoarseness
  13. a drop in blood pressure, causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness (passing out)

Allergic reactions to fish can differ. Sometimes the same person can react differently at diverse times. Fish allergy can cause a severe reaction called anaphylaxis, even if a previous reaction was mild.

Anaphylaxis might start with some of the same symptoms as a less severe reaction, but can quickly get worse. The person may own trouble breathing or pass out. More than one part of the body might be involved. If it isn’t treated, anaphylaxis can be life-threatening.

A kid who has a fish allergy must completely avoid eating fish. Sometimes an allergist can test for allergies to specific types of fish.

Otherwise, it’s best for someone with a fish allergy to avoid every fish.

How Is an Allergic Reaction to Fish Treated?

If your kid has a fish allergy (or any helpful of serious food allergy), the doctor will desire him or her to carry an epinephrine auto-injector in case of an emergency.

An epinephrine auto-injector is a prescription medicine that comes in a little, easy-to-carry container.

It’s simple to use.

What causes allergy on the face

Your doctor will show you how. Kids who are ancient enough can be taught how to give themselves the injection. If they carry the epinephrine, it should be nearby, not left in a locker or in the nurse’s office.

Wherever your kid is, caregivers should always know where the epinephrine is, own simple access to it, and know how to give the shot. Staff at your child’s school should know about the allergy and own an action plan in put. Your child’s medicines should be accessible at every times. Also consider having your kid wear a medical alert bracelet.

Every second counts in an allergic reaction. If your kid starts having serious allergic symptoms, love swelling of the mouth or throat or difficulty breathing, give the epinephrine auto-injector correct away.

Also give it correct away if the symptoms involve two diverse parts of the body, love hives with vomiting. Then call and take your kid to the emergency room. Your kid needs to be under medical supervision because even if the worst seems to own passed, a second wave of serious symptoms can happen.

It’s also a excellent thought to carry an over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamine for your kid, as this can assist treat mild allergy symptoms. Use after — not as a replacement for — the epinephrine shot during life-threatening reactions.

What Else Should I Know?

If allergy testing shows that your kid has a fish allergy, the doctor will give you guidelines on keeping your kid safe.

To prevent allergic reactions, your kid must not eat fish. Your kid also must not eat any foods that might contain fish as ingredients. Anyone who is sensitive to the smell of cooking fish should avoid restaurants and other areas where fish is being cooked.

For information on foods to avoid, check sites such as the Food Allergy Research and Education network (FARE).

Always read food labels to see if a food contains fish. Manufacturers of foods sold in the United States must state whether foods contain any of the top eight most common allergens, including fish.

The label should list "fish" in the ingredient list or tell "Contains fish" after the list.

Some foods glance OK from the ingredient list, but while being made they can come in contact with fish.

What causes allergy on the face

This is called cross-contamination. Glance for advisory statements such as "May contain fish," "Processed in a facility that also processes fish," or "Manufactured on equipment also used for fish." Not every companies label for cross-contamination, so if in doubt, call or email the company to be sure.

Cross-contamination often happens in restaurants. In kitchens, fish can get into a food product because the staff use the same surfaces, utensils (like knives, cutting boards, or pans), or oil to prepare both fish and other foods.

This is particularly common in seafood restaurants, so some people discover it safer to avoid these restaurants.

Fish is also used in a lot of Asian cooking, so there’s a risk of cross-contamination in Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, or Japanese restaurants. When eating at restaurants, it may be best to avoid fried foods because numerous places cook chicken, French fries, and fish in the same oil.

When eating away from home, make certain you own an epinephrine auto-injector with you and that it hasn’t expired. Also, tell the people preparing or serving your child’s food about the fish allergy. Sometimes, you may desire to bring food with you that you know is safe. Don’t eat at the restaurant if the chef, manager, or owner seems uncomfortable with your request for a safe meal.

Also talk to the staff at school about cross-contamination risks for foods in the cafeteria.

It may be best to pack lunches at home so you can control what’s in them.

Other things to hold in mind:

  1. Make certain the epinephrine auto-injector is always on hand and that it is not expired.
  2. Don’t feed your kid cooked foods you didn’t make yourself or anything with unknown ingredients.
  3. Carry a personalized "chef card" for your kid, which can be given to the kitchen staff.

    What causes allergy on the face

    The card details your child’s allergies for food preparers. Food allergy websites provide printable chef card forms in numerous diverse languages.

  4. Tell everyone who handles the food — from relatives to restaurant staff — that your kid has a fish allergy.

How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically. Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone.

Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


The Best Research Resources

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

This academy’s website provides valuable information to assist readers determine the difference between colds, allergies, and sinusitis.

A primer guide on sinusitis also provides more specific information about the chronic version of the illness. Additional resources include a «virtual allergist» that helps you to review your symptoms, as well as a database on pollen counts.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)

In addition to providing a comprehensive guide on sinus infections, the ACAAI website also contains a wealth of information on allergies, asthma, and immunology. The site’s useful tools include a symptom checker, a way to search for an allergist in your area, and a function that allows you to ask an allergist questions about your symptoms.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

For allergy sufferers, the AAFA website contains an easy-to-understand primer on sinusitis.

It also provides comprehensive information on various types of allergies, including those with risk factors for sinusitis.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC website provides basic information on sinus infections and other respiratory illnesses, such as common colds, bronchitis, ear infections, flu, and sore throat. It offers guidance on how to get symptom relief for those illnesses, as well as preventative tips on practicing good hand hygiene, and a recommended immunization schedule.

U.S.

National Library of Medicine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library.

What causes allergy on the face

As part of the National Institutes of Health, their website provides the basics on sinus infection. It also contains a number of links to join you with more information on treatments, diagnostic procedures, and related issues.


Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders.

Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

Have you noticed that your skin is itchy or dry since starting dialysis? If so, you are not alone. Numerous dialysis patients own these issues. It is called uremic pruritis. Itchy skin is diverse for everyone, and it can happen at any time of day, on any part of the body, and be a annoy for some more than others. Some dialysis patients tell they feel itchy in one area, and others feel itchy every over.

What’s significant is trying to understand what may be causing it and finding the best way to manage it.

What causes dry, itchy skin?

A combination of things can cause your skin to be itchy and dry. Some issues are:

  1. Limited fluid intake: Your dialysis treatment removes additional water from your body, and your limited fluid intake between treatments can cause dry skin and trigger itchiness.
  2. Unmanaged phosphorous: Often, itching is caused by high blood levels of phosphorus.

    In your body, additional phosphorus can bind with calcium and lead to feeling itchy. If your healthcare provider has given you phosphate binders, taking them as instructed, and at the same time every day, will help.

  3. Not enough dialysis: Talk to your healthcare team about your symptoms and discover out if you are getting the correct quantity of dialysis. Sometimes too much or too little dialysis can lead to symptoms love dry, itchy skin.
  4. Allergies and other causes: Be certain you are not sensitive to the soaps, laundry detergents, lotions, or perfumes you may be using.

    Sometimes the dyes and fragrances in these products can cause allergic reactions that make skin itchy. Also, taking baths with water that is too boiling can leave your skin too dry and lead to itchy skin.

Useful Tips:

  1. Try to figure out what is causing the itching. Is it better at some times than others? What helps or makes it worse? Tell your healthcare team what changes you feel and see with your skin.
  2. Find a excellent skincare routine, with daily cleansing and moisturizing. Enquire your healthcare team which moisturizers work best for your symptoms.
  3. Don’t scratch your skin! Scratching tends to make the itching worse, and may even damage the skin and lead to infection.
  4. Stick to the diet given to you by your healthcare team along with your phosphate binders.

Pet Allergy: Are You Allergic to Dogs or Cats?

Allergies to pets with fur are common, especially among people who own other allergies or asthma.

In the United States, as numerous as three in 10 people with allergies own allergic reactions to cats and dogs. Cat allergies are about twice as common as dog allergies.

Is There Such a Thing as a Hypoallergenic Pet?

People with dog allergies may be more sensitive to some breeds of dogs than others. Some people may be allergic to every dogs. People may ponder certain breeds of dogs are “hypoallergenic,” but a truly non-allergic dog or cat does not exist.

What Causes a Pet Allergy?

The occupation of the immune system is to discover foreign substances, such as viruses and bacteria, and get rid of them.

Normally, this response protects us from dangerous diseases. People with pet allergies own over-sensitive immune systems. They can react to harmless proteins in the pet's urine, saliva or dander (dead skin cells). The symptoms that result are an allergic reaction. The substances that cause allergic reactions are allergens.

Pet allergens can collect on furniture and other surfaces. The allergens will not lose their strength for a endless time. Sometimes the allergens may remain at high levels for several months and cling to walls, furniture, clothing and other surfaces.

Pet hair is not an allergen.

It can collect dander, urine and saliva. It also can carry other allergens love dust and pollen.

Cat and dog allergens are everywhere. Pet allergens are even in homes and other places that own never housed pets. This is because people can carry pet allergens on their clothing. Also, allergens can get into the air when an animal is petted or groomed. Pet allergens can also be stirred into the air where the allergens own settled. This can happen during dusting, vacuuming or other household activities.

Once airborne, the particles can stay suspended in the air for endless periods.

What Are the Symptoms of a Pet Allergy?

Cat and dog allergens can land on the membranes that line the eyes and nose. Reactions include swelling and itching of the membranes, stuffy nose and inflamed eyes. A pet scratch or lick can cause the skin area to become red. It is common to get itchy eyes after petting an animal then touching your eyes.

If allergen levels are low or sensitivity is minor, symptoms may not appear until after several days of contact with the pet.

Many airborne particles are little enough to get into the lungs.

For some, this exposure can cause severe breathing problems. Highly sensitive people can start coughing, wheezing and own shortness of breath within 15 to 30 minutes of inhaling allergens. Sometimes highly sensitive people also get an intense rash on the face, neck and upper chest.

Contact with a cat can trigger a severe asthma episode (asthma attack) in up to three in ten people with asthma. Cat allergies also can lead to chronic asthma.

How Does a Doctor Diagnose a Pet Allergy?

Your doctor will diagnose a pet allergy based on your symptoms, physical examination, medical history and test results.

Your doctor can use either a blood test or skin test to aid in the diagnosis. Allergy testing will show if there is allergic sensitization to the animal.

Some people discover it hard to believe that they could be allergic to their pets. The doctor may tell you to stay out of the home where the pet lives to see if your symptoms go away.

What causes allergy on the face

It does not assist to remove the dog or cat, because the allergen will remain. Pet allergens still in the home can cause symptoms months after the animal is gone.

What Is the Best Treatment for Pet Allergy?

The best treatment is to avoid contact with cats or dogs or the areas where they live. Hold pets out of your home. If possible, attempt to avoid visiting homes with pets that you are allergic to. Avoiding cats and dogs may give you enough relief that you will not need medicine.

Keeping the pet outdoors will assist, but will not rid the home of pet allergens.

What causes allergy on the face

Another option is to select pets that do not own fur or feathers. Fish, snakes or turtles are some choices.

Pet allergy can be a social problem making it hard to visit friends and relatives who own cats and dogs (and sometimes horses and other animals). This may be especially troublesome for children who cannot participate in activities at the home of friends. Talk to your doctor about possible use of medication before these social exposures and specific measures to take after the exposure.

What If I Desire to Hold My Pet?

Removing the pet from the home is often the best treatment. However, if you still desire to hold your pet, there may be some strategies to reduce exposure.

  1. Remove your pet from the bedroom.

    You spend from one-third to one-half of your time there. Hold the bedroom door closed and clean the bedroom aggressively. You might consider using a HEPA air cleaner in your bedroom.

  2. If you must own carpet, select one with a low pile and steam clean it frequently. Better yet, use throw rugs and wash them in boiling water.
  3. Wear a dust mask to vacuum. Vacuum cleaners stir up allergens that own settled on carpet and make allergies worse. Use a vacuum with a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter if possible.
  4. Change your clothes after prolonged exposure with an animal.
  5. Adding an air cleaner combined with a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly®filter to central heating and air conditioning can assist remove pet allergens from the air.

    Use an air cleaner at least four hours per day. Another type of air cleaner that has an electrostatic filter will remove particles the size of animal allergens from the air. No air cleaner or filter will remove allergens stuck to surfaces, though.

  6. Forced-air heating and air-conditioning can spread allergens through the home. Cover bedroom vents with thick filtering material love cheesecloth.
  7. Washing the pet every week may reduce airborne allergens, but is of questionable worth in reducing a person's symptoms.
  8. Have someone without a pet allergy brush the pet exterior to remove dander as well as clean the litter box or cage.
  9. Animal allergens are sticky.

    So you must remove the animal's favorite furniture, remove wall-to-wall carpet and scrub the walls and woodwork. Hold surfaces throughout the home clean and uncluttered. Bare floors and walls are best.

  10. Talk to your allergist about options for medicine or immunotherapy.


Glance for this mark to discover products proven more suitable for people with asthma and allergies.
Discover CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® products on ourCertification program websiteor download our app on theApp Storeor Play.

Medical ReviewOctober

Conditions


Itchy Eyes: Causes And Cures

By Amy Hellem; reviewed by Gary Heiting, OD

Almost everyone experiences itchy eyes from time to time.

There are numerous causes of itchy eyes, and the problem often is accompanied by itchy eyelids — especially at the base of the eyelashes — and red eyes or swollen eyelids.

The medical term for itchy eyes is ocular pruritus ("proo-RIE-tus").

This article will assist you study more about itchy eyes and how you can get relief. (Spoiler alert: rubbing your eyes won't help.)


Treatments For Itchy Eyes

Symptoms of itchy eyes sometimes can be alleviated with over-the-counter artificial tears or allergy eye drops.

What causes allergy on the face

But in numerous cases, prescription eye drops or oral medications may be needed to provide relief. Some medications also may assist you become less prone to attacks of itchy eyes in the future, especially if symptoms are due to seasonal allergies.

Applying a clean, freezing, damp washcloth over your closed eyes also may assist alleviate the severity of itchy eyes.


Causes Of Itchy Eyes

Most of the time, itchy eyes are caused by some type of allergy. An irritating substance (called an allergen) — such as pollen, dust and animal dander — causes the release of compounds called histamines in the tissues around the eyes, which results in itching, redness and swelling.

Rubbing won't assist your itchy eyes.

In fact, it can make things worse.

Eye allergies come in lots of shapes and sizes and can be seasonal or perennial.

Seasonal allergies cause what's known as allergic conjunctivitis. It's most common in the spring and drop and is caused by high pollen counts and exposure to outdoor allergens love grass and weeds.

Perennial allergies, on the other hand, are present every year endless and are caused by things love mold and dust.

In some cases, a product you're using can cause allergy-related itchy eyes.

For example, some people develop allergies to their contact lens solutions. Other products with ingredients that may cause your eyes to itch include: artificial tears used to treat dry eyes; makeup; and lotions, creams and soaps.

But allergies aren't the only cause of itchy eyes. If (in addition to itching) your eyes are burning, the cause may be dry eye syndrome or meibomian gland dysfunction, not allergies.

Similarly, if your eyelids are red and inflamed, you may own a condition called blepharitis, which is caused by bacteria and in some cases by microscopic mites that live on the eyelids.

If you wear contact lenses, itchy eyes can make lens wear extremely uncomfortable.

Sometimes, if you are wearing your contacts too endless or don't replace them frequently enough, this too can cause itchy eyes.

Because the causes for itchy eyes are so varied, if your symptoms are lasting, getting worse, or don't subside when allergy season winds below, make an appointment with your eye doctor.

NEED AN EYE EXAM? Discover an eye doctor near you and make an appointment.


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What causes allergy on the face