What causes allergies in home

Some children are allergic to certain foods, medicines, insects and latex. When they come into contact with these things they develop symptoms, such as hives and shortness of breath. This is known as an allergic reaction. Things that cause an allergic reaction are called allergens. Take every allergic symptoms seriously because both mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis).

Common Causes of Anaphylaxis

Foods.

The most common food allergies are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish and shellfish. The most common food allergies in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

Insect stings from bees, wasps, yellow jackets and fire ants.

Latex found in things such as balloons, rubber bands, hospital gloves.

Medicines, especially penicillin, sulfa drugs, insulin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen.

Be Aware of Symptoms of Anaphylaxis

The symptoms of anaphylaxis may happen shortly after having contact with an allergen and can get worse quickly.

What causes allergies in home

You can’t predict how your kid will react to a certain allergen from one time to the next. Both the types of symptoms and how serious they are can change. So, it’s significant for you to be prepared for every allergic reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Symptoms of anaphylaxis generally involve more than one part of the body such as the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut, and brain. Some symptoms include:

  1. Dizziness and/or fainting
  2. Skin rashes and itching and hives
  3. Stomach pain, vomiting or diarrhea
  4. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  5. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing (whistling sound during breathing)
  6. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Your child’s doctor will give you a finish list of symptoms.

After Anaphylaxis

  1. Follow the steps in your child’s emergency care plan to give your kid epinephrine correct away.

    This can save your child’s life.

  2. Sometimes, a reaction is followed by a second, more severe, reaction known as a biphasic reaction. This second reaction can happen within 4 to 8 hours of the first reaction or even later. That’s why people should be watched in the emergency room for several hours after anaphylaxis.
  3. After giving epinephrine, always call or a local ambulance service. Tell them that your kid is having a serious allergic reaction and may need more epinephrine.
  4. Make a follow up appointment or an appointment with an allergy specialist to further diagnose and treat the allergy.
  5. Your kid needs to be taken to a hospital by ambulance. Medical staff will watch your kid closely for further reactions and treat him or her if needed.

Be Prepared for Anaphylaxis

Keep an Emergency Plan with You

You, your kid, and others who supervise or care for your kid need to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis and how to treat it. Your child’s doctor will give you a written step-by-step plan on what to do in an emergency. The plan is called an allergy emergency care plan or anaphylaxis emergency action plan. To be prepared, you, your kid, and others who care for your kid need to own copies of this plan.

About Epinephrine

Epinephrine is the medicine used to treat anaphylaxis. The emergency action plan tells you when and how to give epinephrine.

You cannot rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis.

Know How to Use Epinephrine

Learn how to give your kid epinephrine. Epinephrine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. When you press it against your child’s outer thigh, it injects a single dose of medicine. Your child’s health care team will show you how to use it. You, in turn, can teach people who spend time with your kid how to use it.

Always own two epinephrine auto-injectors near your kid. Do not store epinephrine in your car or other places where it will get too boiling or too freezing.

Discard if the liquid is not clear, and replace it when it expires.

Take Steps to Avoid Anaphylaxis

The best way to avoid anaphylaxis is for your kid to stay away from allergens.

What causes allergies in home

Teach your kid about his or her allergy in an age-appropriate way. Teach your kid to tell an adult about a reaction, how to avoid allergens and how and when to use an epinephrine auto-injector. Here are some first steps you can take for each type of allergy:

Food. Learn how to read food labels and avoid cross-contact. Read the label every time you purchase a product, even if you’ve used it before. Ingredients in any given product may change.

Insect allergies.

Wear closed-toe shoes and insect repellent when outdoors. Avoid loose-fitting clothing that can trap an insect between the clothing and the skin.

Medicine allergies. Tell your doctor about medicines your kid is allergic to. Know both the generic and brand names of the medicines.

Latex allergies. Tell your doctors, dentists and other health care providers about your child’s latex allergy. Enquire them to put a note in your child’s medical chart about your child’s allergy. Also remind them of the allergy before any medical procedure or test.

For every allergies:  Educate family, friends, the school and others who will be with your kid about your child’s allergies.

They can assist your kid avoid allergens and help if anaphylaxis occurs.

Reviewed by medical advisors June

Know How to Treat Anaphylaxis

  • After giving epinephrine, always call or a local ambulance service. Tell them that your kid is having a serious allergic reaction and may need more epinephrine.
  • Follow the steps in your child’s emergency care plan to give your kid epinephrine correct away. This can save your child’s life.
  • Your kid needs to be taken to a hospital by ambulance. Medical staff will watch your kid closely for further reactions and treat him or her if needed.

How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically. Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone. Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.

How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically.

Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone. Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders.

Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction usually develop within a few minutes of being exposed to something you’re allergic to, although occasionally they can develop gradually over a few hours.

Although allergic reactions can be a nuisance and hamper your normal activities, most are mild.

Very occasionally, a severe reaction called anaphylaxis can occur.


Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November
Next review due: 22 November

Are You Allergic to Your Pet? Breathe Easy—You Can Still Hold Your Animal Companion!

Although numerous people own discovered the beneficial effects of caring for a furry friend, the fact remains that roughly 15 to 20% of the population is allergic to animals. The result? Countless pet parents in unhappy, unhealthy situations—and their beloved pets are the cause! Allergen is the medical term for the actual substance that causes an allergic reaction. Touching or inhaling allergens leads to reactions in allergic individuals.

Symptoms can include red, itchy, watery eyes and nose; sneezing; coughing; scratchy or sore throat; itchy skin, and most serious of every, difficulty breathing.

The most common pet allergens are proteins found in their dander (scales of ancient skin that are constantly shed by an animal), saliva, urine and sebaceous cells. Any animal can trigger an allergic response, but cats are the most common culprits. People can also become allergic to exotic pets such as ferrets, guinea pigs, birds, rabbits and rodents. There is no species or breed to which humans cannot develop allergies.

Fur length and type will not affect or prevent allergies. Certain pets can be less irritating than others to those who suffer from allergies, but that is strictly on an individual basis and cannot be predicted.

Once the diagnosis of a pet allergy is made, a physician will often recommend eliminating the companion animal from the surroundings. Heartbreaking? Yes. Absolutely necessary? Not always. Hold in mind that most people are allergic to several things besides pets, such as dust mites, molds and pollens, every of which can be found in the home.

Allergic symptoms result from the entire cumulative allergen load. That means that if you eliminate some of the other allergens, you may not own to get rid of your pet.

What causes allergies in home

(Conversely, should you decide to remove your pet from your home, this may not immediately solve your problems.) You must also be prepared to invest the time and effort needed to decontaminate your home environment, limit future exposure to allergens and discover a physician who will work with you. Read on for helpful tips:

Improving the Immediate Environment

  1. Use anti-allergen room sprays. These sprays deactivate allergens, rendering them harmless.

    Enquire your allergist for a product recommendation.

  2. Create an allergen-free room. A bedroom is often the best and most practical choice. By preventing your pet from entering this room, you can ensure at least eight hours of liberty from allergens every night. It’s a excellent thought to use hypoallergenic bedding and pillow materials.
  3. Clean the litter box frequently. Use low-dust, perfume-free filler. Clumping litter is a excellent choice.
  4. Vacuum frequently using a vacuum equipped with a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate arresting) filter or a disposable electrostatic bag.

    Other kinds of bags will permit allergens to blow back out of the vacuum.

  5. Dust regularly. Wiping below the walls will also cut below on allergens.
  6. Install an air purifier fitted with a HEPA filter. Our modern, energy-efficient homes lock in air that is loaded with allergens, so it’s brilliant to let in some unused air daily.
  7. Limit fabrics. Allergens collect in rugs, drapes and upholstery, so do your best to limit or eliminate them from your home.

    If you select to hold some fabrics, steam-clean them regularly.

    What causes allergies in home

    Cotton-covered furniture is the smartest choice, and washable blinds or shades make excellent window treatments. You can also cover your furniture with sheets or blankets which you can remove and wash regularly.

  8. Invest in washable pet bedding and cages that can be cleaned often and easily.


Decontaminating Your Pet

  1. Wipe your pet with a product formulated to prevent dander from building up and flaking off into the environment.

    Enquire your veterinarian to propose one that is safe to use on animals who groom themselves.

  2. Bathe your pet at least once a week. Your veterinarian can recommend a shampoo that won’t dry out his skin. Bathing works to wash off the allergens that accumulate in an animal’s fur.
  3. Note any symptoms of dermatitis exhibited by your companion animal. Dermatitis often leads to accelerated skin and fur shedding, which will up your allergen exposure.
  4. Brush or comb your pet frequently. It’s best to do this outdoors, if possible.

    (The ASPCA does not recommend keeping cats outdoors, so make certain your feline is leashed if you take him outside.)


Taking Care of Yourself

  1. Wash your hands after handling your companion animal and before touching your face. The areas around your nose and eyes are particularly sensitive to allergens.
  2. If possible, own someone other than yourself do the housecleaning, litter box work and pet washing, wiping and brushing. If you must clean the home or change the litter, be certain to wear a dust mask.
  3. Designate a “pet outfit” from among your most easily washed clothes.

    Wear it when playing or cuddling with your companion, and you’ll leave other clothing uncontaminated.

  4. Find a physician, preferably an allergy specialist, who will make certain that your pet is the cause of your allergies and will assist alleviate your symptoms. Medications and immunotherapy (desensitizing shots) can often permit you and your companion animal to remain together happily ever after.


Most Common Allergies

Drug Allergy

Prescription drugs own been through a rigorous process of testing to ensure safety, despite this, a minority of individuals will develop side-effects.

Side- effects are termed “adverse drug reactions” by doctors and although the majority of adverse drug reactions are relatively minor and may even permit continuation with the drug, in some cases more severe symptoms can more

Allergy in Children

The bulk of allergic disease occurs in childhood, with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema and food allergy comprising a significant percentage of the workload of doctors dealing with children in primary care and hospital paediatric departments.

In a recent large UK survey, 20% of children were reported to own had asthma in the previous year, 18% had allergic rhino conjunctivitis (hay fever) and 16% had eczema. This represents a massive increase in prevalence compared with similar studies in the s where prevalence rates were 3 fold lower. Of these children 47% had at least two co-existing conditions e.g. asthma and eczema. Read more

Rhinitis

Rhinitis means inflammation of the lining of the nose Rhinitis is defined clinically as symptoms of runny nose itching, sneezing and nasal blockage (congestion)..

Common causes of rhinitis are allergies which may be seasonal (‘hayfever’) or happen all-year-round (examples include allergy to home dust mite, cats, dogs and moulds).Infections which may be acute or chronic represent another common cause. Rhinitis (whether due to allergic or other causes) is a risk factor for the development of asthma. Rhinitis is also implicated in otitis media with effusion and in sinusitis which should rightly be termed rhinosinusitis since sinus inflammation almost always involves the nasal passages as well. Read more

Atopic Eczema (Dermatitis)

Eczema is a pattern of itchy skin rash consisting of tiny pink bumps that may join together producing ill-defined pink or red patches.

There are numerous types of eczema – some own known causes. Dermatitis is the term used for eczema reactions that are caused by external agents/factors.

What causes allergies in home

Atopic eczema is often referred to as “infantile” of childhood eczema because that is when it generally develops. Atopic eczema is generally associated with allergies (hayfever or asthma) in either the affected individuals or in their shut relatives. Read more

Food Allergy and Food Intolerance

If someone reacts to a food, they may own a Food Hypersensitivity (FHS). FHS reactions involving the immune system are known as food allergy (FA), every other reactions are classified as food intolerances (FI). Read more

Asthma

What is asthma?
Asthma is a condition that causes swelling and inflammation inside the airways of the lungs.

This inflammation and swelling is there to a greater or lesser degree every the time in people with more inflammation there is the harder it becomes to breathe. People with asthma also own over-sensitive airways, so their airways react to triggers that do not affect other people. When sufferers come into contact with something that irritates their airways (a trigger), it can cause their airways to narrow. Read more

Skin Allergy

The allergic process can affect the skin producing 2 main types of rashes namely urticaria (hives, nettlerash, welts) or eczema (see atopic dermatitis section).

Urticaria is a red itchy bumpy rash that is often short-lived and can appear in various shapes and sizes anywhere on the is extremely common affecting 1 in 5 of the population at sometime in their some people urticaria is accompanied by large dramatic swellings commonly affecting lips, eyelids, tongue and hand called angioedema.

Read more

Anaphylaxis: Severe Allergic Reactions


The Best Research Resources

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

This academy’s website provides valuable information to assist readers determine the difference between colds, allergies, and sinusitis. A primer guide on sinusitis also provides more specific information about the chronic version of the illness. Additional resources include a «virtual allergist» that helps you to review your symptoms, as well as a database on pollen counts.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)

In addition to providing a comprehensive guide on sinus infections, the ACAAI website also contains a wealth of information on allergies, asthma, and immunology.

The site’s useful tools include a symptom checker, a way to search for an allergist in your area, and a function that allows you to ask an allergist questions about your symptoms.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

For allergy sufferers, the AAFA website contains an easy-to-understand primer on sinusitis. It also provides comprehensive information on various types of allergies, including those with risk factors for sinusitis.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC website provides basic information on sinus infections and other respiratory illnesses, such as common colds, bronchitis, ear infections, flu, and sore throat.

It offers guidance on how to get symptom relief for those illnesses, as well as preventative tips on practicing good hand hygiene, and a recommended immunization schedule.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library. As part of the National Institutes of Health, their website provides the basics on sinus infection. It also contains a number of links to join you with more information on treatments, diagnostic procedures, and related issues.


Main allergy symptoms

Common symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  1. a raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  2. sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  3. tummy pain, feeling ill, vomiting or diarrhoea
  4. wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  5. swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  6. itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  7. dry, red and cracked skin

The symptoms vary depending on what you’re allergic to and how you come into contact with it.

For example, you may have a runny nose if exposed to pollen, develop a rash if you own a skin allergy, or feel sick if you eat something you’re allergic to.

See your GP if you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something. They can assist determine whether the symptoms are caused by an allergy or another condition.

Read more about diagnosing allergies.


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