What can you take for allergies while breastfeeding

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this sheet applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

If you own been told that your breastfed baby has food allergies, you may be wondering what to do next. Will you be capable to continue to breastfeed? You may be surprised to study that in most cases, the answer is yes.

Even a baby who has never been formula fed, and has never had any food besides breast milk may show signs of food allergy including: diarrhea, bloody stools, vomiting, colic, eczema, constipation and poor growth. Babies can develop allergies to foods that you are eating while you are breastfeeding.

Proteins from the foods that you eat can appear in your milk within 3-6 hours after eating them.

If you eliminate these foods from your diet, the proteins will vanish from your breast milk in 1-2 weeks and the baby’s symptoms should slowly improve. There are no recommendations to avoid any food while you are breastfeeding to prevent allergies. These restrictions are only recommended for breastfed babies who own developed symptoms.


Common foods that cause allergies

Any food could potentially cause an allergy. The following foods, though, are those that most commonly cause allergies.

  1. Nuts
  2. Eggs
  3. Peanuts
  4. Soy
  5. Dairy (all forms of cow’s milk, including milk, cheese, yogurt and ice cream)
  6. Wheat

The challenge is discovering which foods your baby is allergic to.

Allergy testing in young infants is often not dependable. One way to determine which foods are a problem for your baby is to hold a food diary of the foods you eat along with a record of your baby’s symptoms. You may see a pattern develop of worsening symptoms whenever you eat certain foods.


Loratadine Levels and Effects while Breastfeeding

Effects in Breastfed Infants

A survey of 51 mothers who took loratadine during breastfeeding between 1999 and 2001 was conducted by a teratogen information service.

Most of the infants were over 2 months ancient and loratadine was generally taken for one week or less. Two mothers reported minor sedation in their infants, one at 3 days of age and one at 3 months of age. Both mothers were taking a dose of 10 mg daily. Weight acquire and psychomotor development were similar to infants in a control group of breastfed infants unexposed to medications.[3] An extension of the study that compared the results of this study (plus one additional patient) to that of a control group of 88 mothers who took a drug known to be safe while breastfeeding.

What can you take for allergies while breastfeeding

No differences in sedation or any other side effects (p=0.606) in the baby were found between mothers who took loratadine during breastfeeding and those of the control group.[4]

Drug Levels

After a single oral dose of 40 mg of loratadine in 6 women, average peak milk levels of 29.2 (range 20.4 to 39) mcg/L occurred at two hours after the dose. In addition, average desloratadine peak milk levels of 16 (range 9 to 29.6) mcg/L occurred at 5.3 hours after the dose. The entire quantity excreted in milk over 48 hours was 11.7 mcg of loratadine and its metabolite. However, the dose istered was four times greater than the usual dose of the drug, so a entire dose of about 3 mcg would be expected with a 10 mg dose.

The calculated average and maximum expected doses of loratadine plus desloratadine in milk were 0.46 and 1.1% and of the maternal weight-adjusted dose, respectively, after the 40 mg dose.[2]

Effects on Lactation and Breastmilk

Antihistamines in relatively high doses given by injection can decrease basal serum prolactin in nonlactating women and in early postpartum women.[5][6] However, suckling-induced prolactin secretion is not affected by antihistamine pretreatment of postpartum mothers.[5] Whether lower oral doses of antihistamines own the same effect on serum prolactin or whether the effects on prolactin own any consequences on breastfeeding success own not been studied.

The prolactin level in a mom with established lactation may not affect her ability to breastfeed.

One mom out of 51 mothers who took loratadine while nursing reported that she had decreased milk production after taking loratadine 10 mg daily for less than one week at 4 months postpartum.[3]

Alternate Drugs to Consider

Desloratadine, Fexofenadine

Summary of Use during Lactation

Because of its lack of sedation and low milk levels, maternal use of loratadine would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants. Loratadine might own a negative effect on lactation, especially in combination with a sympathomimetic agent such as pseudoephedrine.

The British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology recommends loratadine at its lowest dose as a preferred choice if an antihistamine is required during breastfeeding.[1]

References

1. Powell RJ, Du Toit GL, Siddique N et al. BSACI guidelines for the management of chronic urticaria and angio-oedema. Clin Exp Allergy. 2007;37:631-50. PMID: 17456211

2.

What can you take for allergies while breastfeeding

Hilbert J, Radwanski E, Affine MB et al. Excretion of loratadine in human breast milk. J Clin Pharmacol. 1988;28:234-9. PMID: 2966185

3.

What can you take for allergies while breastfeeding

Messinis IE, Souvatzoglou A, Fais N et al. Histamine H1 receptor participation in the control of prolactin secretion in postpartum. J Endocrinol Invest. 1985;8:143-6.

What can you take for allergies while breastfeeding

PMID: 3928731

4. Merlob P, Stahl B. Prospective follow-up of adverse reactions in breast-fed infants exposed to loratadine treatment (1999-2001). BELTIS Newsl.

What can you take for allergies while breastfeeding

2002;Number 10:43-51.

5. Merlob P. Prospective follow-up of adverse reactions in breast-fed infants exposed to maternal loratadine treatment (1999-2002). Unpublished manuscript.

6. Pontiroli AE, De Castro e Silva E, Mazzoleni F et al. The effect of histamine and H1 and H2 receptors on prolactin and luteinizing hormone release in humans: sex differences and the role of stress. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1981;52:924-8. PMID: 7228996


Loratadine Identification

CAS Registry Number

79794-75-5

Substance Name

Loratadine

Drug Class

Breast Feeding

Lactation

Antihistamines

Nonsedating Antihistamines


Hay fever remedies

When you seek advice from your pharmacist, GP or health visitor they will take into account factors such as:

  1. how effective the medicine is 
  2. how mild or severe your symptoms are – if your symptoms are mild, you may be capable to manage without treatment
  3. how much of the medicine passes to your baby through your breast milk

If you take hay fever medicine while you’re breastfeeding, you should take the lowest possible dose for the shortest possible time, unless your healthcare professional gives you other advice.

Try topical treatments first.

These are medicines that you don’t need to swallow such as nasal sprays and eyedrops.

What can you take for allergies while breastfeeding

Corticosteroid nasal sprays assist to unblock your nose and sinuses. They’re unlikely to pass into your breast milk and only in low amounts.

Sodium cromoglicate eyedrops relieve the redness, itchiness and watering of your eyes. It’s unlikely that sodium cromoglicate passes into your breast milk.

What can you take for allergies while breastfeeding

Loratadine or cetirizine are the antihistamine tablets recommended if you’re breastfeeding. They can own diverse brand names, so speak to your pharmacist for advice. These are non-drowsy antihistamines – you should avoid using antihistamines that make you drowsy (sedating) as they can affect your baby if used for more than a short time.

Loratadine use while Breastfeeding

Drugs containing Loratadine: Claritin, Claritin-D, Alavert, Claritin-D 24 Hour, Allergy Relief Tablets, Loratadine-D 24 Hour, Wal-itin, Claritin 24 Hour Allergy, Claritin-D 12 Hour, Alavert D-12 Hour Allergy and Sinus, Show every 31 »Claritin Reditabs, Tavist ND, AllerClear D-24 Hour, Allergy Relief D12, Allergy & Congestion Relief, Leader Allergy Relief D-24, Loratadine-D 12 Hour, Clear-Atadine-D, Loratadine Reditab, Children's Claritin Allergy, Bactimicina Allergy, Clear-Atadine Children's, Dimetapp Children's ND Non-Drowsy Allergy, Claritin Hives Relief, Clear-Atadine, ohm Allergy Relief, Assist I Own Allergies, Vicks QlearQuil Every Day & Every Night 24 Hour Allergy Relief, Children's Allergy Relief 24 Hour, Allergy Relief 24 Hour, Allergy Relief D 24 Hour

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com.

Final updated on Jul 13, 2019.


istrative Information

LactMed Record Number

163

Disclaimer

Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your specific situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.


Foods to avoid

Often it's enough to just remove every dairy from your diet. You'll need to carefully read every food labels to eliminate foods that might contain dairy.

Milk is considered a major food allergen under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2006. That means every food products containing milk as an ingredient must list the expression “Milk” on the product label.

If you are unsure about any product, confirm its ingredients with the manufacturer.

What can you take for allergies while breastfeeding

You can also study more about food labeling laws from Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE).

Look for the following words on food labels and avoid any of these foods:

  1. Lactoglobulin
  2. Cottage cheese
  3. Ghee
  4. Pudding
  5. Butter, butterfat, butter oil
  6. Cheese
  7. Rennet casein
  8. Sour cream
  9. Custard
  10. Buttermilk
  11. Half & half
  12. Cream
  13. Lactoferrin
  14. Dry milk solids
  15. Lactalbumin
  16. Recaldenet
  17. Milk
  18. Nougat
  19. Sour milk solids
  20. Whey
  21. Artificial butter flavor
  22. Casein
  23. Caseinates
  24. Lactulose
  25. Curds
  26. Yogurt

Other ingredients that may be clues to the presence of milk protein include:

  1. Lactic acid starter
  2. Flavorings
  3. High protein flour
  4. Lunch meat, boiling dogs, sausages
  5. Caramel candies
  6. Chocolate
  7. Margarine
  8. Lactose
  9. Non-dairy products


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