What allergy or cold medicine can you take while pregnant

What allergy or cold medicine can you take while pregnant

According to the Food and Drug istration (FDA), no drugs are considered completely safe in pregnancy. The organization advises that women carefully consider the use of any medications, especially pain medications. This is because no pregnant lady would desire to sign up for a medication safety study while she is pregnant. Therefore, the FDA has assigned risk categories to medications based on use in pregnancy:

  1. Category “B” medications show excellent safety studies in pregnant animals but there are no human studies available.
  2. Category “A” medications are medications in which there are excellent studies in pregnant women showing the safety of the medication to the baby in the first trimester.

    What allergy or freezing medicine can you take while pregnant

    There are extremely few medications in this category and no asthma medications.

  3. Category “C” medications may result in adverse effects on the fetus when studied in pregnant animals, but the benefits of these drugs may out weight the potential risks in humans.
  4. Category “D” medications show clear risk to the fetus, but there may be instances in which the benefits outweigh the risks in humans.
  5. Category “X” medications show clear evidence of birth defects in animals and/or human studies and should not be used in pregnancy.


Credits

Adaptation Date: 11/5/

Adapted By: HealthLink BC

Adaptation Reviewed By: HealthLink BC

If youve lived with seasonal allergies, you know what generally eases your symptoms.

But if your allergies flare up while youre pregnant, your choices narrow. Its more work to understand what wont pose a risk to your baby.

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As with most aspects of pregnancy, it’s hard to tell ahead of time how allergies might affect you. The excellent news is that whether your seasonal allergy symptoms are mild or severe, the symptoms themselves likely wont affect your baby, says OB/Gyn Salena Zanotti, MD.

But will you notice a change in your allergy symptoms while you’re pregnant?

It could go either way, she says.

  1. One-third of fortunate women discover that their allergy symptoms clear up.
  2. Another one-third of women discover that their allergy symptoms worsen.
  3. The remaining one-third discover that their allergy symptoms are about the same as before pregnancy.

“It’s amusing, with pregnancy we see allergies go every three ways,” says Dr. Zanotti. “And we see that with asthma as well.”

So however it goes for you, Dr.

Zanotti suggests five tips that will assist you safely manage your symptoms while youre expecting.

Treat mild symptoms with home remedies

Nasal congestion is common during pregnancy, Dr. Zanotti says.

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Using a humidifier in your home can sometimes assist solve that problem. It won’t remove allergens from the environment, but it will moisten the air. And that can assist soothe irritated nasal passages.

You can also attempt a saline or salt water nasal spray to assist ease congestion, she says.

Avoid allergy triggers as much as possible

Environmental allergens such as mold, pollen and animal dander are most often to blame for allergy symptoms.

And they are also the most hard allergens to avoid.

Dr. Zanotti’s advice? When pollen or pollution levels are high, limit your time exterior. Hold your windows closed and turn on your air conditioning or a fan to assist limit your exposure.

Be picky about over-the-counter allergy medications

Many allergy medications aren’t safe to take during pregnancy. But loratadine (found in Claratin®) and cetirizine (found in Zyrtec® and Alleroff®) are two over-the-counter antihistamine medications that doctors consider safe to use during pregnancy and when breastfeeding, Dr.

Zanotti says.

Antihistamine medications work by blocking the effects of histamine, which is a trigger for allergy symptoms.

“These medications are really the first-line medications for treating allergies in pregnant women,” she says.

Take care with allergy shots, pseudoephedrine and herbal remedies

“If you own received allergy shots before pregnancy and thought they helped your symptoms, it’s safe to continue them,” says Dr.

Zanotti. “But we don’t recommend initiating allergy shots during pregnancy, because you don’t know what reaction you will have.”

She says numerous expectant mothers enquire about taking pseudoephedrine (a decongestant in such products as Sudafed®).

She recommends that you avoid it in your first trimester. But you may take it in the second and third trimesters, as endless as you don’t own high blood pressure, she says.

As for herbal remedies and aromatherapy, Dr.

Zanotti says their effects on pregnant women haven’t been studied sufficiently. So it’s best to steer clear of them.

Attempt an intra-nasal steroid spray

If your allergies are severe and you aren’t getting relief from OTC allergy drugs, attempt an intra-nasal steroid spray, such as Nasonex® or Flonase®.

These sprays are safe to use throughout pregnancy and regular dosing is appropriate, Dr. Zanotti says.

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Hang in there

If you own tried Dr.

Zanotti’s treatment options but aren’t getting much relief, remind yourself that the problem is only temporary.

“It’s significant to hold in mind that neither pregnancy nor seasonal allergy symptoms final forever,” she says. “There is light at the finish of the tunnel.”

Rhinitis during pregnancy can be due to allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, or non-allergic rhinitis. If the lady has had allergic rhinitis prior to pregnancy, this could worsen, stay the same, or even improve.

This change in symptoms may be dependent upon numerous factors, including the presence of seasonal allergens and increase in pregnancy hormones.

Non-allergic rhinitis in pregnancy may also be due to an increase in pregnancy hormones, leading to nasal congestion, runny nose, and postnasal drip. This is called “rhinitis of pregnancy”. The symptoms may mimic allergies, but since they are non-allergic in nature, do not reply to anti-histamines.

The pregnant lady with rhinitis may be concerned about the safety of medications during pregnancy, and therefore avoid taking medications.

If avoidance of allergic triggers is not possible or successful, medications may be needed to control symptoms.


References

Citations

  • Wilson RD, et al. (). Pre-conception folic acid and multivitamin supplementation for the primary and secondary prevention of neural tube defects and other folic acid-sensitive congenital anomalies. SOGC Clinical Practice Guideline No. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada 37(6): – Accessed July 20,



Overview

Doctors generally tell women to avoid medicines during pregnancy, if possible, especially during the first 3 months.

That is when a baby’s organs form. But sometimes you own to take medicine to treat a health problem, such as high blood pressure or asthma.

Before prescribing any medicine, your doctor or midwife will glance at whether the risk of taking medicine is higher than the risk of not treating your illness. If you or your baby would face worse problems without treatment, then your doctor or midwife will prescribe medicine or recommend an over-the-counter one. He or she will also glance at which medicine to give you.

For example, some antibiotics are safe for pregnant women, and some are not.

What medicines can you take during pregnancy?

It can be hard to know if a medicine is safe for your baby. Most medicines are not studied in pregnant women, because researchers worry about how the medicines might affect the baby. But some medicines own been taken for so endless by so numerous women that doctors own a excellent thought of how safe they are. Talk to your doctor or midwife before you take any medicines.

In general, doctors tell it is generally safe to take:

    1. HIV medicines.
    2. Penicillin and some other antibiotics.
    3. Some allergy medicines.
    4. Some medicines for depression.
    5. Acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) for fever and pain.
    6. Most asthma medicines.
    7. Some medicines for high blood pressure.
    8. Some over-the-counter freezing medicines.
    9. Some medicines for heart burn.

If you are planning a pregnancy, talk to your doctor or midwife about any medicines you are taking, including over-the-counter ones.

Some of them may be safe during pregnancy. But others may not be safe. Your doctor or midwife may own you stop taking a medicine or may switch you to another one. Some medicines that aren’t safe in the first trimester may be safe to use later in the pregnancy.

What medicines should you avoid during pregnancy?

Some medicines are known to increase the chance of birth defects or other problems. But sometimes, stopping a medicine (such as one that controls seizures) has greater risk to the mom and the baby than continuing to take the medicine. Talk to your doctor about any medicines you take if you are thinking about having a baby or if you are pregnant.

Some of the over-the-counter medicines that increase the chances of birth defects are:

  1. Phenylephrine or pseudoephedrine, which are decongestants.

    Avoid medicines with these ingredients during the first trimester.

  2. Bismuth subsalicylate (such as Pepto-Bismol).
  3. Cough and freezing medicines that contain guaifenesin. Avoid medicines with this ingredient during the first trimester.
  4. Pain medicines love aspirin and ibuprofen (such as Advil and Motrin) and naproxen (such as Aleve). The risk of birth defects with these medicines is low.

Some of the prescription medicines that increase the chances of birth defects are:

  1. Some medicines to control seizures, such as valproic acid.
  2. ACE inhibitors, such as benazepril and lisinopril, which lower blood pressure.
  3. Some antibiotics, such as doxycycline and tetracycline.
  4. Alprazolam (such as Xanax), diazepam (such as Valium), and some other medicines used to treat anxiety.
  5. The acne medicine isotretinoin (such as Accutane).

    This medicine is extremely likely to cause birth defects. It should not be taken by women who are pregnant or who may become pregnant.

  6. Lithium, which is used to treat bipolar depression.
  7. Warfarin (such as Coumadin), which helps prevent blood clots.
  8. Methotrexate, which is sometimes used to treat arthritis.
  9. Paroxetine (such as Paxil), which is used to treat depression and other conditions.

Is it okay to take natural health products?

Talk to your doctor or midwife about any natural health products that you own been taking.

Don’t take any natural health products unless you talk with your doctor or midwife first.

Folic acid is especially significant before and in the first few weeks of pregnancy, because it prevents some birth defects. Take mcg of folic acid every day for at least 2 to 3 months before trying to get pregnant and while you are pregnant.footnote 1 Some women need higher doses. Talk with your health professional about how much folic acid you need.

You can get folic acid in an over-the-counter multivitamin or in a multivitamin that your doctor or midwife prescribes. Follow your doctor’s advice about how to get higher amounts of folic acid. Don’t just take more multivitamins. You could get too much of the other substances that are in the multivitamin.

In some cases doctors and midwives prescribe additional iron.


Treatment of Rhinitis During Pregnancy

  1. Medicated Nasal Sprays: Cromolyn nasal spray (NasalCrom®, generics) is helpful in treating allergic rhinitis if it is used before exposure to an allergen and prior to the onset of symptoms.

    This medication is pregnancy category B and is available over the counter. If this medication is not helpful, one nasal steroid, budesonide (Rhinocort Aqua®), received a pregnancy category B rating (all others are category C), and therefore would be the nasal steroid of choice during pregnancy. Rhinocort became available over-the-counter without a prescription in early

  2. Antihistamines: Older antihistamines, such as chlorpheniramine and tripelennamine, are the preferred agents to treat allergic rhinitis during pregnancy, and are both category B medications. Newer antihistamines such as over-the-counter loratadine (Claritin®/Alavert® and generic forms) and cetirizine (Zyrtec® and generic forms) are also pregnancy category B medications.
  3. Decongestants: Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed and numerous generic forms) is the preferred oral decongestant to treat allergic and non-allergic rhinitis during pregnancy, although should be avoided during the entire first trimester, as it has been associated with baby gastroschisis. This medication is pregnancy category C.
  4. FDA Pregnancy Categories.

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Updated: Wed Jun 26

  5. Nasal Saline: Rhinitis of pregnancy tends not to reply to antihistamines or nasal sprays. This condition seems to reply temporarily to nasal saline (saltwater), which is safe to use during pregnancy (it is not actually a drug). Nasal saline is available over the counter, is inexpensive, and can be used as often as needed. Generally, 3 to 6 sprays are placed in each nostril, leaving the saline in the nose for up to 30 seconds, and then blowing the nose.
  6. FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA has reviewed possible risks of pain medicine use during pregnancy.

    U.S. Food and Drug istration. 01/19/

  7. Pali-Schöll I, Namazy J, Jensen-Jarolim E. Allergic diseases and asthma in pregnancy, a secondary publication. World Allergy Organ J. ;10(1) Published Mar 2. doi/s

  8. Dzieciolowska-baran E, Teul-swiniarska I, Gawlikowska-sroka A, Poziomkowska-gesicka I, Zietek Z. Rhinitis as a cause of respiratory disorders during pregnancy. Adv Exp Med Biol. ; doi: /_27

  9. Immunotherapy:Allergy shots can be continued during pregnancy, but it is not recommended to start this treatment while pregnant.

    Typically the dose of the allergy shots is not increased, and numerous allergists will cut the dose of the allergy shot by 50 percent during pregnancy. Some allergists feel that allergy shots should be stopped during pregnancy, given the risk of anaphylaxis and possible harm to the fetus as a result. Other than anaphylaxis, there is no data showing that the allergy shots themselves are actually harmful to the fetus.

  10. National Middle for Complimentary and Integrative Health. Is Rinsing Your Sinuses With Neti Pots Safe? September 24,

Allergy skin testing is generally deferred during pregnancy, although a RAST would be a safe alternative if the results are needed during pregnancy.

Before any medication is taken during pregnancy, the doctor and patient must own a risk/benefit discussion.

This means that the benefits of the medication should be weighed against the risks—and the medication should only be taken if the benefits outweigh the risks.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial policy to study more about how we fact-check and hold our content precise, dependable, and trustworthy.

  • Allergic rhinitis is caused by allergies to substances called allergens.
  • FDA Pregnancy Categories.

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Updated: Wed Jun 26

  • National Middle for Complimentary and Integrative Health. Is Rinsing Your Sinuses With Neti Pots Safe? September 24,

  • Itching in the nose and eyes
  • Dzieciolowska-baran E, Teul-swiniarska I, Gawlikowska-sroka A, Poziomkowska-gesicka I, Zietek Z. Rhinitis as a cause of respiratory disorders during pregnancy. Adv Exp Med Biol. ; doi: /_27

  • Sneezing
  • Leukotriene receptor antagonists block the action of significant chemical messengers other than histamine that are involved in allergic reactions.
  • Runny nose
  • Perennial allergic rhinitis is caused by allergens that are present every year endless.

    The primary causes of this type of rhinitis are allergies to dust mites, mold, animal dander and cockroach debris.

  • Antihistamines are taken by mouth or as a nasal spray. They can relieve sneezing and itching in the nose and eyes. They also reduce a runny nose and, to a lesser extent, nasal stuffiness.
  • Seasonal allergic rhinitis is sometimes called “hay fever.” But, people with seasonal allergic rhinitis do not own to own a fever and do not own to be exposed to hay to develop this condition. It is an allergic reaction to pollen from trees, grasses and weeds.

    This type of rhinitis occurs mainly in the spring and drop, when pollen from trees, grasses and weeds are in the air.

  • Nasal corticosteroids are used in nasal spray form. They reduce inflammation in the nose and block allergic reactions. They are the most effective medicine type for allergic rhinitis because they can reduce every symptoms, including nasal congestion. Nasal corticosteroids own few side effects.
  • Pali-Schöll I, Namazy J, Jensen-Jarolim E. Allergic diseases and asthma in pregnancy, a secondary publication.

    World Allergy Organ J. ;10(1) Published Mar 2. doi/s

  • Non-allergic rhinitis is not caused by allergens. Smoke, chemicals or other irritating environmental conditions may provoke non-allergic rhinitis. Hormonal changes, physical defects of the nose (like a deviated septum) and the overuse of nose sprays may also cause it. Sometimes medications cause it. Often, the cause of this type of rhinitis is not well understood. But it is common in patients with non-allergic asthma. The symptoms are similar to allergy symptoms.
  • Stuffy nose (congestion)
  • Cromolyn sodium is a nasal spray that blocks the release of chemicals that cause allergy symptoms, including histamine and leukotrienes.

    This medicine has few side effects, but you must take it four times a day.

  • FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA has reviewed possible risks of pain medicine use during pregnancy. U.S. Food and Drug istration. 01/19/

  • Infectious rhinitis is possibly the most common type of rhinitis. It is also known as the common freezing or upper respiratory infection (URI). Colds happen when a freezing virus settles into the mucous membranes of the nose and sinus cavities and causes an infection.
  • Decongestants are taken by mouth or as a nasal spray or drops.

    What allergy or freezing medicine can you take while pregnant

    They assist shrink the lining of the nasal passages which relieves nasal stuffiness. These nose drops and sprays shouldbetaken short-term.

  • Mucus (phlegm) in the throat (postnasal drip)

Rhinitis (Nasal Allergies)

What Are the Types of Rhinitis?

There are several types of rhinitis:

  1. Seasonal allergic rhinitis is sometimes called “hay fever.” But, people with seasonal allergic rhinitis do not own to own a fever and do not own to be exposed to hay to develop this condition. It is an allergic reaction to pollen from trees, grasses and weeds.

    This type of rhinitis occurs mainly in the spring and drop, when pollen from trees, grasses and weeds are in the air.

  2. Allergic rhinitis is caused by allergies to substances called allergens.
  3. Perennial allergic rhinitis is caused by allergens that are present every year endless. The primary causes of this type of rhinitis are allergies to dust mites, mold, animal dander and cockroach debris.
  4. Non-allergic rhinitis is not caused by allergens.

    Smoke, chemicals or other irritating environmental conditions may provoke non-allergic rhinitis. Hormonal changes, physical defects of the nose (like a deviated septum) and the overuse of nose sprays may also cause it. Sometimes medications cause it. Often, the cause of this type of rhinitis is not well understood. But it is common in patients with non-allergic asthma. The symptoms are similar to allergy symptoms.

  5. Infectious rhinitis is possibly the most common type of rhinitis. It is also known as the common freezing or upper respiratory infection (URI).

    Colds happen when a freezing virus settles into the mucous membranes of the nose and sinus cavities and causes an infection.

What Causes Rhinitis?

Irritants or allergens (substances that provoke an allergic response) may cause rhinitis. The cells of your body react to these irritants or allergens by releasinghistamineand other chemicals. Rhinitis is often a temporary condition. It clears up on its own after a few days for numerous people. In others, especially those with allergies, rhinitis can be a chronic problem. Chronic means it is almost always present or recurs often. Rhinitis can final for weeks to months with allergen exposure.

What Is Rhinitis?

The wordrhinitismeans “inflammation of the nose.” The nose produces fluid called mucus.

This fluid is normally thin and clear. It helps to hold dust, debris and allergens out of the lungs. Mucus traps particles love dust and pollen, as well as bacteria and viruses.

Mucus generally drains below the back of your throat. You’re not aware of this most of the time because it is a little quantity and is thin. When the nose becomes irritated, it may produce more mucus, which becomes thick and pale yellow. The mucus may start to flow from the front of the nose as well as the back. Substances in the mucus may irritate the back of the throat and cause coughing. Postnasal drip occurs when more mucus drains below the back of the throat.

What Are the Treatments for Allergic Rhinitis?

The first and best option is to avoid contact with substances that trigger your nasal allergies (allergens).

When prevention is not enough, consider using over-the-counter or prescription medicines:

  1. Decongestants are taken by mouth or as a nasal spray or drops. They assist shrink the lining of the nasal passages which relieves nasal stuffiness. These nose drops and sprays shouldbetaken short-term.
  2. Antihistamines are taken by mouth or as a nasal spray. They can relieve sneezing and itching in the nose and eyes.

    They also reduce a runny nose and, to a lesser extent, nasal stuffiness.

  3. Nasal corticosteroids are used in nasal spray form. They reduce inflammation in the nose and block allergic reactions. They are the most effective medicine type for allergic rhinitis because they can reduce every symptoms, including nasal congestion. Nasal corticosteroids own few side effects.
  4. Leukotriene receptor antagonists block the action of significant chemical messengers other than histamine that are involved in allergic reactions.
  5. Cromolyn sodium is a nasal spray that blocks the release of chemicals that cause allergy symptoms, including histamine and leukotrienes.

    This medicine has few side effects, but you must take it four times a day.

Nasal allergy symptoms may vanish completely when the allergen is removed or after the allergy is treated. Talk to your pharmacist and health care provider about what is best for you.

Many people with allergies do not get finish relief from medications. They may be candidates for immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is a long-term treatment that can assist prevent or reduce the severity of allergic reactions and change the course of allergic disease by modifying the body’s immune response to allergens.

What Are the Symptoms of Rhinitis?

Rhinitis symptoms include:

  1. Sneezing
  2. Itching in the nose and eyes
  3. Stuffy nose (congestion)
  4. Runny nose
  5. Mucus (phlegm) in the throat (postnasal drip)

Is It Allergies or a Cold?

Sometimes it can be hard to tell the difference between allergies and the common freezing.

There are more than a hundred strains of freezing viruses. Each tends to become widespread at certain times of the year, which is why you may error a freezing for a seasonal allergy. Allergies happen at the same time every year and final as endless as the allergen is in the air (usually weeks per allergen). Allergies cause itching of the nose and eyes along with other nasal symptoms. Colds final about one week and own less itching of the nose and eyes.

How Can I Prevent Allergic Rhinitis?

The first and best option is to avoid contact with allergens.

Other prevention tips are:

Medical Review October


US Pharm
. ;38(9)

ABSTRACT: More than 80% of pregnant women take OTC or prescription drugs during pregnancy, with only 60% of these patients consulting a health care professional when selecting a product. Common pregnancy-associated conditions include cough, freezing, allergies, gastrointestinal disorders, and pain. The cough, freezing, and allergy products most widely used during pregnancy are antihistamines, decongestants, antitussives, and expectorants. Current updates to the immunization schedule include istering tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine with each pregnancy.

Influenza vaccination should also be recommended for every pregnant women and can be given in any trimester. The decision to treat pregnancy-associated conditions should be based on a number of factors, including safety, symptom severity, and potential for quality-of-life improvement.

The prevalence of medication use during pregnancy is widespread and on the rise. More than 80% of pregnant women take OTC or prescription drugs during pregnancy, with only 60% of these patients consulting a health care professional when selecting a product.1 There is a delicate risk-benefit estimation concerning the health of both the mom and the fetus that must be considered in the use of drugs during pregnancy.

A study investigating the use of prescription, OTC, and herbal medicines in a rural obstetric population of participants found that over 90% of the patients took either prescription and/or OTC medication.2 A larger cohort study (multicenter, urban) found that 64% of expectant mothers had been prescribed a drug other than a vitamin or mineral supplement at some point during their pregnancy.3

Medication use during pregnancy can generally be attributed to preexisting conditions such as hypertension or cardiac problems, pregnancy-associated conditions such as nausea and vomiting, or acute conditions such as seasonal allergies or bacterial infections.

Among the most frequently used medications in pregnancy are antiemetics, antacids, antihistamines, analgesics, antimicrobials, diuretics, hypnotics, and tranquilizers.4

Rhinitis (Nasal Allergies)

What Are the Types of Rhinitis?

There are several types of rhinitis:

  1. Seasonal allergic rhinitis is sometimes called “hay fever.” But, people with seasonal allergic rhinitis do not own to own a fever and do not own to be exposed to hay to develop this condition. It is an allergic reaction to pollen from trees, grasses and weeds. This type of rhinitis occurs mainly in the spring and drop, when pollen from trees, grasses and weeds are in the air.
  2. Allergic rhinitis is caused by allergies to substances called allergens.

  3. Perennial allergic rhinitis is caused by allergens that are present every year endless. The primary causes of this type of rhinitis are allergies to dust mites, mold, animal dander and cockroach debris.
  4. Non-allergic rhinitis is not caused by allergens. Smoke, chemicals or other irritating environmental conditions may provoke non-allergic rhinitis. Hormonal changes, physical defects of the nose (like a deviated septum) and the overuse of nose sprays may also cause it. Sometimes medications cause it. Often, the cause of this type of rhinitis is not well understood.

    But it is common in patients with non-allergic asthma. The symptoms are similar to allergy symptoms.

  5. Infectious rhinitis is possibly the most common type of rhinitis. It is also known as the common freezing or upper respiratory infection (URI). Colds happen when a freezing virus settles into the mucous membranes of the nose and sinus cavities and causes an infection.

What Causes Rhinitis?

Irritants or allergens (substances that provoke an allergic response) may cause rhinitis.

The cells of your body react to these irritants or allergens by releasinghistamineand other chemicals. Rhinitis is often a temporary condition. It clears up on its own after a few days for numerous people. In others, especially those with allergies, rhinitis can be a chronic problem. Chronic means it is almost always present or recurs often. Rhinitis can final for weeks to months with allergen exposure.

What Is Rhinitis?

The wordrhinitismeans “inflammation of the nose.” The nose produces fluid called mucus. This fluid is normally thin and clear. It helps to hold dust, debris and allergens out of the lungs. Mucus traps particles love dust and pollen, as well as bacteria and viruses.

Mucus generally drains below the back of your throat.

What allergy or freezing medicine can you take while pregnant

You’re not aware of this most of the time because it is a little quantity and is thin. When the nose becomes irritated, it may produce more mucus, which becomes thick and pale yellow. The mucus may start to flow from the front of the nose as well as the back. Substances in the mucus may irritate the back of the throat and cause coughing. Postnasal drip occurs when more mucus drains below the back of the throat.

What Are the Treatments for Allergic Rhinitis?

The first and best option is to avoid contact with substances that trigger your nasal allergies (allergens).

When prevention is not enough, consider using over-the-counter or prescription medicines:

  1. Decongestants are taken by mouth or as a nasal spray or drops. They assist shrink the lining of the nasal passages which relieves nasal stuffiness. These nose drops and sprays shouldbetaken short-term.
  2. Antihistamines are taken by mouth or as a nasal spray. They can relieve sneezing and itching in the nose and eyes. They also reduce a runny nose and, to a lesser extent, nasal stuffiness.
  3. Nasal corticosteroids are used in nasal spray form. They reduce inflammation in the nose and block allergic reactions. They are the most effective medicine type for allergic rhinitis because they can reduce every symptoms, including nasal congestion.

    Nasal corticosteroids own few side effects.

  4. Leukotriene receptor antagonists block the action of significant chemical messengers other than histamine that are involved in allergic reactions.
  5. Cromolyn sodium is a nasal spray that blocks the release of chemicals that cause allergy symptoms, including histamine and leukotrienes.

    What allergy or freezing medicine can you take while pregnant

    This medicine has few side effects, but you must take it four times a day.

Nasal allergy symptoms may vanish completely when the allergen is removed or after the allergy is treated. Talk to your pharmacist and health care provider about what is best for you.

Many people with allergies do not get finish relief from medications. They may be candidates for immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is a long-term treatment that can assist prevent or reduce the severity of allergic reactions and change the course of allergic disease by modifying the body’s immune response to allergens.

What Are the Symptoms of Rhinitis?

Rhinitis symptoms include:

  1. Sneezing
  2. Itching in the nose and eyes
  3. Stuffy nose (congestion)
  4. Runny nose
  5. Mucus (phlegm) in the throat (postnasal drip)

Is It Allergies or a Cold?

Sometimes it can be hard to tell the difference between allergies and the common freezing.

There are more than a hundred strains of freezing viruses. Each tends to become widespread at certain times of the year, which is why you may error a freezing for a seasonal allergy. Allergies happen at the same time every year and final as endless as the allergen is in the air (usually weeks per allergen). Allergies cause itching of the nose and eyes along with other nasal symptoms. Colds final about one week and own less itching of the nose and eyes.

How Can I Prevent Allergic Rhinitis?

The first and best option is to avoid contact with allergens.

Other prevention tips are:

Medical Review October


US Pharm
. ;38(9)

ABSTRACT: More than 80% of pregnant women take OTC or prescription drugs during pregnancy, with only 60% of these patients consulting a health care professional when selecting a product. Common pregnancy-associated conditions include cough, freezing, allergies, gastrointestinal disorders, and pain. The cough, freezing, and allergy products most widely used during pregnancy are antihistamines, decongestants, antitussives, and expectorants.

Current updates to the immunization schedule include istering tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine with each pregnancy. Influenza vaccination should also be recommended for every pregnant women and can be given in any trimester. The decision to treat pregnancy-associated conditions should be based on a number of factors, including safety, symptom severity, and potential for quality-of-life improvement.

The prevalence of medication use during pregnancy is widespread and on the rise. More than 80% of pregnant women take OTC or prescription drugs during pregnancy, with only 60% of these patients consulting a health care professional when selecting a product.1 There is a delicate risk-benefit estimation concerning the health of both the mom and the fetus that must be considered in the use of drugs during pregnancy.

A study investigating the use of prescription, OTC, and herbal medicines in a rural obstetric population of participants found that over 90% of the patients took either prescription and/or OTC medication.2 A larger cohort study (multicenter, urban) found that 64% of expectant mothers had been prescribed a drug other than a vitamin or mineral supplement at some point during their pregnancy.3

Medication use during pregnancy can generally be attributed to preexisting conditions such as hypertension or cardiac problems, pregnancy-associated conditions such as nausea and vomiting, or acute conditions such as seasonal allergies or bacterial infections.

Among the most frequently used medications in pregnancy are antiemetics, antacids, antihistamines, analgesics, antimicrobials, diuretics, hypnotics, and tranquilizers.4


Diagnosis of Allergic Rhinitis During Pregnancy

Allergy testing includes skin testing or blood tests, called a RAST. In general, allergy skin testing is not done during pregnancy, given the little chance of anaphylaxis which may occur. Anaphylaxis during pregnancy, if severe, could result in a decrease in blood and oxygen to the uterus, possibly harming the fetus.


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