What allergy medicine can i take with warfarin

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Drug Interaction Classification

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Generally avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.


Most frequently checked interactions

View interaction reports for warfarin and the medicines listed below.

Warfarin alcohol/food interactions

There are 5 alcohol/food interactions with warfarin

Warfarin disease interactions

There are 8 disease interactions with warfarin which include:


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Further information

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Medical Disclaimer

COLLAPSE


Patients own poor knowledge of warfarin which may increase their risk of serious side effects, according to research presented today at EuroHeartCare by Dr Kjersti Oterhals, a nurse researcher at Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, Norway.

«The stroke and bleeding complications from warfarin can be fatal,» said Dr Oterhals.

«Worldwide warfarin causes the most deaths from drug-related side effects. Patients need to know what foods and drugs own an impact on how warfarin works, and what to do if they own symptoms of an overdose or underdose.»

Warfarin is given to patients at increased risk of blood clots from conditions such as atrial fibrillation or a mechanical heart valve. Blood clots can travel through the blood to the brain and cause a stroke. Warfarin ‘thins the blood’ by slowing below the anticoagulation effect of vitamin K, thereby increasing the time it takes blood to clot and reducing the risk of stroke.

Taking too much warfain raises the risk of bleeding.

Patients on warfarin take an individually tailored dose that depends on their genes, usual diet, drugs and physical activity. Initially patients own a daily blood test to check their international normalised ratio (INR) which indicates how endless it takes the blood to clot. People not taking warfarin own an INR of around 1 but patients with a mechanical heart valve should own an INR in the range of to to prevent their body creating a blood clot which could travel to the brain and cause a stroke.

«The goal is to thin the blood enough to prevent a stroke but not too much and cause bleeding,» said Dr Oterhals.

«An INR of 3 means it takes 3 times longer to stop a bleeding than it would take someone not on warfarin. If a patient’s INR is under the target range they are at increased risk of thrombosis and above it they are at risk of bleeding complications. Lack of knowledge on what food and drugs interact with warfarin can lead to INR levels exterior the therapeutic range which can be dangerous.»

The study included patients with aortic stenosis who were taking warfarin. Almost two-thirds (63%) took warfarin because they had a mechanical heart valve to treat aortic stenosis and 24% took the drug because they had atrial fibrillation.

Patients were 68 years ancient on average and 70% were men.

Patients received a postal questionnaire with 28 multiple choice questions about warfarin. They answered 18 questions correctly on average but 22% gave correct answers on less than half of the questions. Questions with the least correct answers concerned food and drug interactions and when to call a doctor.

When asked which of the following foods would interfere with warfarin: celery, carrot, coleslaw or green beans, just 25% correctly said coleslaw and most patients answered green beans.

«Patients often ponder green vegetables own the most vitamin K but that’s not true,» said Dr Oterhals.

«Brassica vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower are wealthy sources. Patients do not own to avoid these foods but they should eat an equal quantity every week because the vitamin K will decrease their INR and put them at increased risk of thrombosis or embolism. Patients who love to eat a lot of vitamin K containing foods can take a higher warfarin dosage but they need to be consistent.»

While 80% knew they should go directly to the emergency room if they had nose bleeding that would not stop, only 45% correctly said diarrhoea for more than one day should trigger a visit to the doctor.

Some 86% knew that the INR test tells the pharmacist how thick or thin the blood is while taking warfarin.

The study found that increased age was associated with decreasing correct answers. Dr Oterhals said: «We can only speculate why. Younger people tend to seek out information about how to manage their disease while the older generation wants the doctor to tell them what to do.»

She continued: «Motivated patients should be offered an INR testing kit so that they can monitor their levels and adjust the warfarin dose themselves, just as patients with diabetes who use insulin do. It enables patients to travel and attempt new foods without having to discover a clinic to get tested.

Patients tell me that boiling weather increases their INR while another found out while in Asia that nori decreased his INR.»

Warfarin checklist

  1. Call the doctor: nosebleeds indicate blood is too thin; diarrhoea causes vitamin K loss
  2. Diet: hold vitamin K intake consistent and check content of new foods; even little levels eaten in large amounts affect the INR
  3. Drugs: antibiotics increase INR; avoid herbal medicines; enquire about over the counter drugs
  4. Exercise: patients who exercise regularly need a higher warfarin dose
  5. Be consistent: check how anything out of the ordinary will affect your warfarin.
  6. K.

    Oterhals, C. Deaton, S. De Geest, T. Jaarsma, M. Lenzen, P. Moons, J. Martensson, K. Smith, S. Stewart, A. Stromberg, D. R. Thompson, T. M. Norekval. European cardiac nurses’ current practice and knowledge on anticoagulation therapy. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ; 13 (3): DOI: /

Dr Oterhals concluded: «Warfarin is a life saving drug but can be deadly if not used carefully.

What allergy medicine can i take with warfarin

Health professionals own a responsibility to educate patients but unfortunately even cardiac nurses do not know enough.2 There is an urgent need to improve health professionals’ warfarin knowledge so they can educate patients.»


Story Source:

Materials provided by European Society of Cardiology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  • moderate drug interactions
  • K.

    Oterhals, C. Deaton, S. De Geest, T. Jaarsma, M. Lenzen, P. Moons, J. Martensson, K. Smith, S. Stewart, A. Stromberg, D. R. Thompson, T. M. Norekval. European cardiac nurses’ current practice and knowledge on anticoagulation therapy. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ; 13 (3): DOI: /

  • major drug interactions
  • 74 minor drug interactions

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Cite This Page:

European Society of Cardiology. «Poor patient warfarin knowledge may increase risk of deadly side effects: Awareness was lowest on diet and drug interactions and when to call a doctor.» ScienceDaily.

What allergy medicine can i take with warfarin

ScienceDaily, 15 April <>.

European Society of Cardiology. (, April 15). Poor patient warfarin knowledge may increase risk of deadly side effects: Awareness was lowest on diet and drug interactions and when to call a doctor. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, from

European Society of Cardiology. «Poor patient warfarin knowledge may increase risk of deadly side effects: Awareness was lowest on diet and drug interactions and when to call a doctor.» ScienceDaily. (accessed January 29, ).

Nutrition and diet can affect your treatment with warfarin.

What allergy medicine can i take with warfarin

Therefore, it is significant to hold your vitamin supplement and food intake steady throughout treatment. For example, increasing vitamin K levels in the body can promote clotting and reduce the effectiveness of warfarin. While there is no need to avoid products that contain vitamin K, you should maintain a consistent level of consumption of these products. Foods wealthy in vitamin K include beef liver, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens, endive, kale, lettuce, mustard greens, parsley, soy beans, spinach, Swiss chard, turnip greens, watercress, and other green leafy vegetables. Moderate to high levels of vitamin K are also found in other foods such as asparagus, avocados, dill pickles, green peas, green tea, canola oil, margarine, mayonnaise, olive oil, and soybean oil.

However, even foods that do not contain much vitamin K may occasionally affect the action of warfarin. There own been reports of patients who experienced bleeding complications and increased INR or bleeding times after consuming large quantities of cranberry juice, mangos, grapefruit, grapefruit juice, grapefruit seed extract, or pomegranate juice. Again, you do not need to avoid these foods completely, but it may be preferable to limit their consumption, or at least maintain the same level of use while you are receiving warfarin.

Talk to a healthcare provider if you are uncertain about what foods or medications you take that may interact with warfarin. It is significant to tell your doctor about every medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

When warfarin is given with enteral (tube) feedings, you may interrupt the feeding for one hour before and one hour after the warfarin dose to minimize potential for interaction.

Feeding formulas containing soy protein should be avoided.

Switch to professional interaction data

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of chlorpheniramine such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with chlorpheniramine. Do not use more than the recommended dose of chlorpheniramine, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you.

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you own any questions or concerns.

Switch to professional interaction data

Warfarin Drug Interactions

A entire of drugs are known to interact with warfarin.

  1. moderate drug interactions
  2. major drug interactions
  3. 74 minor drug interactions

Show every medications in the database that may interact with warfarin.


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Cite This Page:

European Society of Cardiology.

«Poor patient warfarin knowledge may increase risk of deadly side effects: Awareness was lowest on diet and drug interactions and when to call a doctor.» ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 April <>.

European Society of Cardiology. (, April 15). Poor patient warfarin knowledge may increase risk of deadly side effects: Awareness was lowest on diet and drug interactions and when to call a doctor. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, from

European Society of Cardiology.

«Poor patient warfarin knowledge may increase risk of deadly side effects: Awareness was lowest on diet and drug interactions and when to call a doctor.» ScienceDaily. (accessed January 29, ).

Nutrition and diet can affect your treatment with warfarin. Therefore, it is significant to hold your vitamin supplement and food intake steady throughout treatment. For example, increasing vitamin K levels in the body can promote clotting and reduce the effectiveness of warfarin. While there is no need to avoid products that contain vitamin K, you should maintain a consistent level of consumption of these products.

Foods wealthy in vitamin K include beef liver, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens, endive, kale, lettuce, mustard greens, parsley, soy beans, spinach, Swiss chard, turnip greens, watercress, and other green leafy vegetables. Moderate to high levels of vitamin K are also found in other foods such as asparagus, avocados, dill pickles, green peas, green tea, canola oil, margarine, mayonnaise, olive oil, and soybean oil. However, even foods that do not contain much vitamin K may occasionally affect the action of warfarin. There own been reports of patients who experienced bleeding complications and increased INR or bleeding times after consuming large quantities of cranberry juice, mangos, grapefruit, grapefruit juice, grapefruit seed extract, or pomegranate juice.

Again, you do not need to avoid these foods completely, but it may be preferable to limit their consumption, or at least maintain the same level of use while you are receiving warfarin. Talk to a healthcare provider if you are uncertain about what foods or medications you take that may interact with warfarin. It is significant to tell your doctor about every medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

When warfarin is given with enteral (tube) feedings, you may interrupt the feeding for one hour before and one hour after the warfarin dose to minimize potential for interaction.

Feeding formulas containing soy protein should be avoided.

Switch to professional interaction data

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of chlorpheniramine such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment.

What allergy medicine can i take with warfarin

You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with chlorpheniramine. Do not use more than the recommended dose of chlorpheniramine, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you own any questions or concerns.

Switch to professional interaction data

Warfarin Drug Interactions

A entire of drugs are known to interact with warfarin.

  1. moderate drug interactions
  2. major drug interactions
  3. 74 minor drug interactions

Show every medications in the database that may interact with warfarin.


IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

What is the most significant information I should know about COUMADIN® (warfarin sodium)?

COUMADIN can cause bleeding which can be serious and sometimes lead to death.

This is because COUMADIN is a blood thinner medicine that lowers the chance of blood clots forming in your body.

  • You may own a higher risk of bleeding if you take COUMADIN and:
  • are 65 years of age or older
  • have a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding
  • have high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • have a history of stroke, or “mini-stroke” (transient ischemic attack or TIA)
  • have serious heart disease
  • have a low blood count or cancer
  • have had trauma, such as an accident or surgery
  • have kidney problems
  • take other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, including:
    1. other medicines to prevent or treat blood clots
    2. a medicine that contains heparin
    3. nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
    4. take warfarin sodium for a endless time.

      Warfarin sodium is the athletic ingredient in COUMADIN

    Tell your healthcare provider if you take any of these medicines. Enquire your healthcare provider if you are not certain if your medicine is one mentioned above. Numerous other medicines can interact with COUMADIN, and affect the dose you need or increase COUMADIN side effects. Do not change or stop any medicines, or start new ones, before talking to your healthcare provider.

    Do not take other medicines that contain warfarin sodium while taking COUMADIN.

  • Get your regular blood test (INR test) to check for your response to COUMADIN, to see how quick your blood clots. Your healthcare provider will decide what INR numbers are best for you and adjust your dose of COUMADIN to hold your INR in your target range.
  • Call your healthcare provider correct away if you get any of the following signs or symptoms of bleeding problems:
    1. bleeding from cuts that takes a endless time to stop
    2. pain, swelling, or discomfort
    3. headaches, dizziness, or weakness
    4. unusual bruising (bruises that develop without known cause or grow in size)
    5. bleeding gums
    6. coughing up blood
    7. pink or brown urine
    8. nosebleeds
    9. red or black stools
    10. menstrual bleeding or vaginal bleeding that is heavier than normal
    11. vomiting blood or material that looks love coffee grounds
  • Some foods and beverages can interact with COUMADIN and affect your treatment and dose.
    1. Eat a normal balanced diet and talk to your healthcare provider before making any diet changes.

      Do not eat large amounts of leafy green vegetables, which contain vitamin K. Certain vegetable oils also contain large amounts of vitamin K. Too much vitamin K can lower the effect of COUMADIN.

    Do not take COUMADIN if:

    1. you are pregnant unless you own a mechanical heart valve. COUMADIN may cause birth defects, miscarriage, or death of your unborn baby.
    2. your risk of having bleeding problems is higher than the possible benefit of treatment. Your healthcare provider will decide if COUMADIN is correct for you.
    3. you are allergic to warfarin or any of the other ingredients in COUMADIN.

    Before taking COUMADIN, tell your healthcare provider about every of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have bleeding problems, drop often, own liver or kidney problems or are undergoing dialysis, own high blood pressure, own a heart problem called congestive heart failure, own diabetes.
  • are planning to own any surgery or dental procedure; your COUMADIN may need to be stopped for a short time, or your dose adjusted.
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant or are considering breastfeeding while taking COUMADIN.

    1. Females who can become pregnant should use effective birth control during treatment, and for ≥ 1 months after the final dose of COUMADIN

    Tell your healthcare providers that you take COUMADIN, and about every the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Some medicines may affect how COUMADIN works, or may increase your risk of bleeding.

    COUMADIN may cause serious side effects including:

    1. Kidney problems. Kidney injury may happen in people who take COUMADIN.

      Tell your healthcare provider correct away if there is blood in your urine. Your healthcare provider may do tests more often during treatment with COUMADIN to check for bleeding if you already own kidney problems.

    2. Death of skin tissue (skin necrosis or gangrene). This can happen soon after starting COUMADIN, and happens because blood clots form and block blood flow to an area of your body. Call your healthcare provider correct away if you own pain, color, or temperature changes to any area of your body. You may need medical care correct away to prevent death or loss (amputation) of your affected body part.
    3. “Purple toes syndrome.” Call your healthcare provider correct away if you own pain in your toes and they glance purple or dark in color.

    These are not every the side effects of COUMADIN.

    For more information, enquire your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

    What is COUMADIN? COUMADIN is a prescription medicine used to treat blood clots and to lower the chance of blood clots forming in your body. Blood clots can cause a stroke, heart attack, or other serious conditions if they form in the legs or lungs.

    Please see Full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNING regarding bleeding risk and Medication Guide.

    Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects.

    You may report side effects to FDA at FDA

    All individuals depicted are for illustrative purposes only.

    WATCHMAN is for people with atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem who need an alternative to warfarin. This website is intended to provide patients and caregivers with some information about the WATCHMAN Implant. It may assist prepare you for talking to your doctor about your options for reducing stroke risk.

    Important Safety Information

    The WATCHMAN Device is a permanent implant designed to shut the left atrial appendage in the heart in an effort to reduce the risk of stroke.

    With every medical procedures there are risks associated with the implant procedure and the use of the device.

    The risks include but are not limited to accidental heart puncture, air embolism, allergic reaction, anemia, anesthesia risks, arrhythmias, AV (Arteriovenous) fistula, bleeding or throat pain from the TEE (Trans Esophageal Echo) probe, blood clot or air bubbles in the lungs or other organs, bruising at the catheter insertion site, clot formation on the WATCHMAN™ Closure Device, cranial bleed, excessive bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, groin puncture bleed, hypotension, infection/pneumonia, pneumothorax, pulmonary edema, pulmonary vein obstruction, renal failure, stroke, thrombosis and transient ischemic attack.

    What allergy medicine can i take with warfarin

    In rare cases death can occur.

    Be certain to talk with your doctor so that you thoroughly understand every of the risks and benefits associated with the implantation of the WATCHMAN Device.


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