What allergies are out now in nj

If you’re already taking OTC allergy meds (and, you know, keeping your windows closed and washing your face and hair after coming inside), allergy shots, a.k.a. allergen immunotherapy, make your immune system less reactive to allergens (read: pollen), and for some people, they can even induce a cure, says Dr. Parikh.

“By giving little increasing doses of what you are allergic to, you train the immune system to slowly stop being as allergic,” she says. “This is the best way to address allergies, as it targets the underlying problem and builds your immunity to a specific allergen.”

The downside? Allergy shots are a bit of a time commitment.

You’ll need to get them once a week for six to eight months, then once a month for a minimum of two years, says Dr. Parikh. You need to be a little bit patient, too, because it can take about six months to start feeling better (so if you desire protection by March, you’ll probably own to start in September the year before). But a life without allergies?

What allergies are out now in nj

Sounds worth it to me.

Cassie ShortsleeveFreelance WriterCassie Shortsleeve is a skilled freelance author and editor with almost a decade of experience reporting on every things health, fitness, and travel.

Kristin CanningKristin Canning is the health editor at Women’s Health, where she assigns, edits and reports stories on emerging health research and technology, women’s health conditions, psychology, mental health, wellness entrepreneurs, and the intersection of health and culture for both print and digital.

It’s a excellent thought to hold an eye on the predicted pollen counts, particularly if you plan to be outdoors for a endless period of time.

(If you are planning to be exterior working around plants or cutting grass, a dust mask can help.)

But even if you see a high pollen count predicted in the newspaper, on a smartphone app or on TV, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you will be affected. There are numerous types of pollen — from diverse kinds of trees, from grass and from a variety of weeds. As a result, a high overall pollen count doesn’t always indicate a strong concentration of the specific pollen to which you’re allergic.

The opposite can be true, too: The pollen count might be low, but you might discover yourself around one of the pollens that triggers your allergies.

Through testing, an allergist can pinpoint which pollens bring on your symptoms.

What allergies are out now in nj

An allergist can also assist you discover relief by determining which medications will work best for your set of triggers.

This sheet was reviewed for accuracy 4/23/

Ragweed Pollen Allergy

In the tardy summer, about 23 million Americans own symptoms from an allergy to ragweed pollen.1 The symptoms can make life miserable for those with allergies. This allergy can also cause asthma symptoms for people with allergic asthma.

You may feel uncomfortable when ragweed plants release pollen into the air.

Your symptoms may continue until the first frost kills the plant. Depending on your location, ragweed season may final six to 10 weeks. In most areas in the U.S., it peaks in mid-September.

What Is a Ragweed Pollen Allergy?

The occupation of your immune system is to discover foreign substances, love viruses and bacteria, and get rid of them.

What allergies are out now in nj

This response normally protects us from harmful diseases. People with allergies own immune systems that react when they come in contact with allergens. When you are allergic to ragweed pollen and inhale it from the air, rhinitis (hay fever) symptoms show up.

Seventeen types of ragweed grow in North America. Ragweed also belongs to a larger family of plants that can spread pollen by wind. These plants can also cause symptoms.

Members of this plant family include:

  1. Burweed marsh elder
  2. Rabbit brush
  3. Sage
  4. Groundsel bush
  5. Mugwort
  6. Eupatorium

Some family members spread their pollen by insects instead of by wind.

What allergies are out now in nj

They cause fewer allergic reactions. But sniffing these plants can cause symptoms.

Who Gets a Ragweed Allergy?

Seventy-five percent of people who are allergic to pollen are also allergic to ragweed. If you own allergies to one type of pollen, you tend to develop allergies to other types of pollen as well.

If you own a ragweed allergy, you may also get symptoms when you eat these foods:

  1. Cucumber
  2. Honeydew
  3. Banana
  4. White potato
  5. Watermelon
  6. Cantaloupe
  7. Zucchini
  8. Sunflower seeds

This is called oral allergy syndrome (OAS).

OAS occurs because your immune system confuses ragweed pollen with certain foods. Common OAS symptoms include itchy mouth, throat, tongue or face.

What Are the Symptoms?

Rhinitis symptoms often include:

  1. Stuffy or runny nose
  2. Itchy eyes, nose and throat
  3. Sneezing
  4. Itchy or puffy eyes
  5. Mucus in the throat (postnasal drip)

If you own severe allergies, ragweed might trigger asthma symptoms, chronic sinusitis, headaches and congestion that can interfere with sleep.

What Is Ragweed?

Ragweed is a weed that grows throughout the United States, especially in the Eastern and Midwestern states.

Each plant lives only one season. But that one plant can produce up to 1 billion pollen grains.

When mid-August nights grow longer, ragweed flowers mature and release pollen. Warm weather, humidity and breezes after sunrise assist release the pollen. The pollen then travels through the air to another plant to fertilize the seed so a new plant can grow next year.

Ragweed generally grows in rural areas. Near the plants, the pollen counts are highest correct after dawn. The quantity of pollen peaks in numerous urban areas between 10 a.m.

and 3 p.m., depending on the weather. Rain and morning temperatures under 50 degrees Fahrenheit slow below the release of pollen.

Ragweed pollen can travel far. It has been found in the air miles out to sea and two miles up in the atmosphere. But most falls shut to its source.

Turf grasses and other perennial plants easily overgrow ragweed. But where streams of water, farming or chemicals upset the soil – love salting roads in the winter – ragweed will grow. It is often found along roadsides, riverbanks, in vacant lots and fields.

Dormant seeds that live in the soil for decades may grow when the conditions are right.

How Is It Diagnosed?

If you ponder you are allergic to ragweed pollen, see a board-certified allergist. They will enquire you about your medical history, do a physical exam and allergy testing. They may do a skin prick test to confirm your allergy.

For prick/scratch testing, the doctor or nurse places a little drop containing ragweed pollen on your skin. They will then lightly prick or scratch your skin with a needle through the drop. If you are sensitive to ragweed, you will develop redness, swelling and itching at the test site within 15 minutes.

Sometimes your doctor may take a blood test to see if you own the antibody to ragweed.

What Can I Do About It?

There is no cure for a ragweed pollen allergy. But there are ways to treat and manage it.

Track the pollen count for your area. The news media often reports the count for your area, especially when pollen is high. You also can get your area’s pollen counts from the National Allergy Bureau.

Stay indoors in central air conditioning when the pollen count is high.

Get a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® air filter for your air conditioner. If you do spend time exterior, attempt to go out before 10 a.m. and after 3 p.m. Ragweed pollen peaks in the middle of the day.

Prevent pollen from being tracked into your home. If you spend a lot of time exterior during peak pollen time:

  1. Take your shoes off outside
  2. Don’t wear your “outside” clothes to bed
  3. Take a shower and shampoo your hair at night

You might even consider moving to get away from ragweed.

This will often assist you feel better for a short time. But you can develop allergies to plants in your new location in a few years.

What allergies are out now in nj

And ragweed is found in every state except Alaska. A well-thought out treatment plan is a better way to live with your allergies.

Take anti-inflammatory or antihistamine medicines, and start treatment in the summer. Numerous over-the-counter medicines work well to control pollen allergy symptoms.

What allergies are out now in nj

They can also assist eye, nose and asthma symptoms. Numerous newer antihistamines don’t cause as much drowsiness as older ones.

Anti-inflammatory and antihistamine nose sprays also assist and own few side effects. You can also discover eye drops for eye symptoms. Leukotriene inhibitors can assist by blocking chemicals your body releases when you own an allergic reaction.

For long-term relief, see an allergist about immunotherapy. This type of treatment can reduce the allergic response to specific allergens. There are two types: allergy shots and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT).

Allergy shots involve giving injections of allergens in an increasing dose over time.

They relieve symptoms for most people and can final for years to decades.

With SLIT, you take a little dose of an allergen under your tongue. You also gradually become more sensitive.

If you own allergic asthma, your Asthma Action Plan may include some of these allergy treatments to assist you hold your asthma under control.

With the correct treatment plan, you should see major improvements in your symptoms.

References
1. Ragweed Allergy.

(, November 14). Retrieved from

Medical Review August

For the vast majority of people, ragweed is little more than a green and yellow shrub. But for about 10% of the US population, the plant is a one-way ticket to weeks of misery: a runny nose, streaming eyes, and even hives. The more plants there are, the worse the reaction.

Here’s the bad news: The ragweed season is underway, and it’s already being described as brutal.

Here’s some worse news: It’s not going to get better anytime soon.

Ragweed thrives in boiling, wet weather—precisely the helpful of summer we now know to be typical of the climate crisis.

This year, the US has experienced above-average rainfall, coupled with warm temperatures. Such perfect conditions (for ragweed) beget more plants, producing a longer ragweed season and postponing relief for allergy sufferers.

“The final few years, the trend has been for higher ragweed counts, and part of that is the longer season and general climate warming,” allergist Stanley Fineman told Web MD. “We anticipate the pollen will be significant this year.”

Expect conditions around the US to worsen as the weeds’ 1 billion pollen grains per plant (!) percolate around the country.

Wind makes the reaction worse while helping the plants to propagate their seeds more widely.

Pollen levels generally peak in mid-September, and peel off with the first hard frost of the year. In the tristate area of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, that’s likely to come in tardy October; in midwestern states, it’s generally a little earlier. In southern states such as Texas, it could be as tardy as November.

And if you’re among the fortunate ones who don’t spend autumn with tissues on standby, don’t get too smug. Climate change also is a friend to tick-borne illnesses such as Lyme disease. Warmer temperatures increase populations of mice and deer—both tasty tick fodder.

The tick population rises in turn, increasing the spread of diseases such as Lyme or ehrlichiosis.

Those endless, boiling summers come at a extremely nasty cost.

Your Seasonal Allergies Symptoms May Include Itchy Skin This Spring

Spring is here, and you may be ready for the warmer weather, time exterior, and chance to let the unused air back into your homes. But, every year 67 million individuals suffer from seasonal allergies, so for some, the spring season is dreaded thanks to the increase of pollen, dust, and mold that cause these allergies. Even if you expect or plan for seasonal allergies, they can often leave you feeling miserable with their adverse impact on your sinuses and skin.

Seasonal Allergy Symptoms

Seasonal allergies impact individuals differently depending on climate, location, and their individual reactions.

For some, the symptoms are severe enough to require medication, and for others, they are more manageable. Common seasonal allergy symptoms include:

  1. Watery eyes
  2. Itchy eyes
  3. Runny noses
  4. Itchy throat
  5. Itchy sinuses
  6. Sneezing
  7. Postnasal drip
  8. Itchy Skin

Unknown Signs of Allergies

Just love symptoms can vary among individuals, there are numerous signs of allergies that you may not be aware of, including:

  1. Dark circles under your eyes
  2. Asthma
  3. Being overly tired
  4. Lack of sleep
  5. Lack of endurance
  6. Respiratory infections
  7. Headaches

Since these signs are lesser known than the symptoms listed above, numerous individuals go without a diagnosis of their seasonal allergies for years.

Spring Allergies and Your Skin

To properly manage spring allergies, you should see an allergist that can assist you identify what types of allergies you suffer from and create a plan of action moving forward.

What allergies are out now in nj

While most individuals experience sneezing, watery or itchy eyes, and red noses, a common symptom of allergies is itchy skin. If you suffer from itchy skin or dry red patches, you may need more than lotion to cure it.

Causes of Itchy Skin

Starting in tardy winter/early spring, trees and plants start to bud creating invisible airborne allergens love mold and pollen. For some individuals, these allergens create an increased quantity of histamine in their blood flow which causes inflammation, making the skin sensitive.

If the skin is highly reactive, it can trigger allergy-related itchiness and even eczema.

How to Prevent Itchy Skin

While you can’t eliminate pollen, ragweed, or other causes of allergies, there are some steps you can take to assist manage your itchy skin. Minimize stress when possible, studies show high amounts of stress can increase histamine and create more adverse allergy reactions. A change in your skin care routine may be necessary to calm the inflammation and reduce itchiness.

It is also significant to eat correct and drink plenty of water, so your body has the necessary nutrients it needs to effectively manage allergies.

Plus, some foods own high amounts of histamine in them that can trigger or increase the severity of the seasonal allergies. If you spend time outdoors, consider changing your clothes once you return inside. Wash your hair every night to remove the pollen and allergens before going to sleep to prevent them from transitioning to your bed linens and pillow.

Sometimes spring allergies can be managed on your own and other times contacting an expert is necessary.

If you are suffering from itchy skin that may be eczema, contact Windsor Dermatology today at


What does that mean for my allergy meds? When should I start taking them?

There’s no point in waiting until you’re miserable to take allergy meds, especially if you desire to hold up your outdoor workouts.

In fact, allergists recommend you start taking meds a couple weeks before allergy season arrives, or, at the latest, take them the moment you start having symptoms, says Dr. Parikh. Taking them early can stop an immune system freak-out before it happens, lessening the severity of symptoms, he adds.

Check out the National Allergy Map to figure out when to start taking meds depending on where you live.

As for which allergy meds to take, if you’re seriously stuffed, start with steroid nasal sprays such as Flonase or Rhinocort, which reduce inflammation-induced stuffiness, says Dr. Keet. And if you’ve got itching, sneezing, and a runny nose, too, glance for non-sedating antihistamines such as Zyrtec, Xyzal, or Allegra, she adds. Just remember: While OTC allergy meds suppress symptoms, they don’t cure the problem, so they may be less effective if your allergies are worsening, notes Dr.

Parikh.


Okay, so when does allergy season start?

Well, it’s technically *always* allergy season due to year-round offenders such as dust mites, mold, and pet dander, says Purvi Parikh, MD, an allergist and immunologist with Allergy & Asthma Network. But some allergens–pollens, specifically—are seasonal.

Jewelyn Butron

Tree pollen, for example, pops up in the spring (generally in tardy March to April), grass pollen arrives in the tardy spring (around May), weed pollen is most prevalent in the summer (July to August), and ragweed pollen takes over from summer to drop (late August to the first frost), says Dr.

Parikh.

And even worse news: Climate change means allergy season begins earlier and lasts longer, adds Corinne Keet, MD, PhD, a professor and allergist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

To get super-specific, has a National Allergy Map that provides an up-to-date allergy forecast in diverse areas around the country and an Allergy Alert app that gives five-day forecasts with in-depth info on specific allergens, helping you decide if you should stay indoors that day.

Certain areas own also seen a particularly large increase in pollen during allergy season.

In , the New York Times reported on the extreme blankets of pollen that hit North Carolina; Georgia and Chicago also faced especially aggressive allergy seasons too. In Alaska, temperatures are rising so quickly (as in numerous other far northern countries), that the pollen count and season duration are seeing unprecedented growth.


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